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Re: [CDV700CLUB] StaticMaster Po210 source

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  • Chris Smolinski
    Doh! Make that 20 mm. It might be closer to 15 mm, with the grill it is difficult to get an accurate measurement. ... Chris Smolinski Black Cat Systems
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 1, 2003
      Doh!

      Make that 20 mm. It might be closer to 15 mm, with the grill it is
      difficult to get an accurate measurement.

      ---
      Chris Smolinski
      Black Cat Systems
      http://www.blackcatsystems.com/
      Macintosh Software
      GM-10 Radiation detection system

      On Tue, 30 Sep 2003, J. Marshall Reber wrote:

      >
      > Chris Smolinski wrote:
      >
      > > . . . 200 mm long
      >
      > Pretty good sized brush!
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • DH
      ... polonium ... if you ... beryllium ... putting a ... Smart man. The Po alphas would take *years* to kill you. The Be dust would make it irreversibly hard
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 1, 2003
        --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, Chris Smolinski <bcs@b...> wrote:
        > The best technique for this is to mix powdered beryllium and
        polonium
        > together. This is also a sure fire way to die an early death, since
        if you
        > don't die from radiation poisoning from inhaling polonium, the
        beryllium
        > (highly toxic) will certainly get you. So I'll settle for just
        putting a
        > piece of Be in front of the unit.

        Smart man. The Po alphas would take *years* to kill you.
        The Be dust would make it irreversibly hard to breathe
        much more quickly.

        As a n-detector, you might be able to use U-235
        and a scintillator. You split one of those and note
        2 huge hits, 10x larger than normal. Classic 1939?
        experiment IIRC. Only here you aren't discovering
        fission (conveniently just before WWII..)
        by seeing what happens when you hit stuff
        with neutrons, you're using fission to detect neutrons.

        Someone one this list has tried
        this, I'll let him or her contact you.

        The Fiestaware reactor.. producing femtowatts
        for the Future!
      • Chris Smolinski
        ... As I recall, LND sells a neutron detector using U235. I m not sure the local True Value hardware store still sells U235, so I may have to pass on this
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 1, 2003
          On Wed, 1 Oct 2003, DH wrote:

          > Smart man. The Po alphas would take *years* to kill you.
          > The Be dust would make it irreversibly hard to breathe
          > much more quickly.
          >
          > As a n-detector, you might be able to use U-235
          > and a scintillator. You split one of those and note
          > 2 huge hits, 10x larger than normal. Classic 1939?
          > experiment IIRC. Only here you aren't discovering
          > fission (conveniently just before WWII..)
          > by seeing what happens when you hit stuff
          > with neutrons, you're using fission to detect neutrons.

          As I recall, LND sells a neutron detector using U235. I'm not sure the
          local True Value hardware store still sells U235, so I may have to pass on
          this technique. I am keeping my eye out for a BF3 neutron detector though.
        • Dudley Emer
          Chris I have some Eberline PRN 4 handheld neutron instruments for sale if you are interested. Its surprising to see how many natural neutrons go winging by
          Message 4 of 13 , Oct 1, 2003
            Chris I have some Eberline PRN 4 handheld neutron instruments for sale if you are interested.  Its surprising to see how many natural neutrons go winging by out there.
             
            Dudley
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2003 10:29 AM
            Subject: Re: [CDV700CLUB] Re: StaticMaster Po210 source

            On Wed, 1 Oct 2003, DH wrote:

            > Smart man.  The Po alphas would take *years* to kill you.
            > The Be dust would make it irreversibly hard to breathe
            > much more quickly.
            >
            > As a n-detector, you might be able to use U-235
            > and a scintillator.  You split one of those and note
            > 2 huge hits, 10x larger than normal.  Classic 1939?
            > experiment IIRC.  Only here you aren't discovering
            > fission (conveniently just before WWII..)
            > by seeing what happens when you hit stuff
            > with neutrons, you're using fission to detect neutrons.

            As I recall, LND sells a neutron detector using U235. I'm not sure the
            local True Value hardware store still sells U235, so I may have to pass on
            this technique. I am keeping my eye out for a BF3 neutron detector though.




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          • DH
            ... sale if you are interested. Its surprising to see how many natural neutrons go winging by out there. Where are they coming from? Are they part of the
            Message 5 of 13 , Oct 2, 2003
              --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "Dudley Emer" <dfemer@c...> wrote:
              > Chris I have some Eberline PRN 4 handheld neutron instruments for
              sale if you are interested. Its surprising to see how many natural
              neutrons go winging by out there.

              Where are they coming from? Are they part of the
              cosmic ray secondary debris? Spontaneous fission
              in bedrock? They have a half life of 12 mins IIRC;
              I suppose some could make it from the sun (in 8 mins
              if you're going the speed limit)?
            • Chris Smolinski
              I think most are cosmic ray debris. There s some spontaneous fission, but I would not think that much. Getting a neutron counter would be one more step closer
              Message 6 of 13 , Oct 2, 2003
                I think most are cosmic ray debris. There's some spontaneous fission, but
                I would not think that much.

                Getting a neutron counter would be one more step closer to being able to
                build a run a fusor (I'll just need an extra 10 hours in each day to have
                the time to actually build one!)

                ---
                Chris Smolinski
                Black Cat Systems
                http://www.blackcatsystems.com/
                Macintosh Software
                GM-10 Radiation detection system

                On Thu, 2 Oct 2003, DH wrote:

                > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "Dudley Emer" <dfemer@c...> wrote:
                > > Chris I have some Eberline PRN 4 handheld neutron instruments for
                > sale if you are interested. Its surprising to see how many natural
                > neutrons go winging by out there.
                >
                > Where are they coming from? Are they part of the
                > cosmic ray secondary debris? Spontaneous fission
                > in bedrock? They have a half life of 12 mins IIRC;
                > I suppose some could make it from the sun (in 8 mins
                > if you're going the speed limit)?
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Community email addresses:
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              • John Boyle
                Chris, This isn t all that new, but it s the first reference to it that I ve found. It seems to be the latest effort in neutron counting. I found the physics
                Message 7 of 13 , Oct 3, 2003
                  Chris,

                  This isn't all that new, but it's the first reference to it that I've
                  found. It seems to be the latest effort in neutron counting.
                  I found the physics simple and interesting:

                  http://www.nsbri.org/Radiation/BonnerBallWorkings.html

                  John


                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Chris Smolinski" <bcs@...>

                  > Getting a neutron counter would be one more step closer to being able to
                  > build a run a fusor (I'll just need an extra 10 hours in each day to have
                  > the time to actually build one!)
                  >
                  > ---
                  > Chris Smolinski
                  > Black Cat Systems
                  > http://www.blackcatsystems.com/
                  > Macintosh Software
                  > GM-10 Radiation detection system
                • Chris Smolinski
                  Ah yes, He3 neutron detection. I ll have to check some of my older texts to see how this design compares to the usual He3 neutron detection tubes. ... Chris
                  Message 8 of 13 , Oct 3, 2003
                    Ah yes, He3 neutron detection. I'll have to check some of my older texts
                    to see how this design compares to the usual He3 neutron detection tubes.


                    ---
                    Chris Smolinski
                    Black Cat Systems
                    http://www.blackcatsystems.com/
                    Macintosh Software
                    GM-10 Radiation detection system

                    On Fri, 3 Oct 2003, John Boyle wrote:

                    > Chris,
                    >
                    > This isn't all that new, but it's the first reference to it that I've
                    > found. It seems to be the latest effort in neutron counting.
                    > I found the physics simple and interesting:
                    >
                    > http://www.nsbri.org/Radiation/BonnerBallWorkings.html
                    >
                    > John
                    >
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: "Chris Smolinski" <bcs@...>
                    >
                    > > Getting a neutron counter would be one more step closer to being able to
                    > > build a run a fusor (I'll just need an extra 10 hours in each day to have
                    > > the time to actually build one!)
                    > >
                    > > ---
                    > > Chris Smolinski
                    > > Black Cat Systems
                    > > http://www.blackcatsystems.com/
                    > > Macintosh Software
                    > > GM-10 Radiation detection system
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
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