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Re: the future

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  • Jon Iverson
    Hi David, I agree with Mike. If you have a burning desire to do something, a lot of times you have to go beyond what you already see/ have. Self study, other
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 1, 2010
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      Hi David,
       
      I agree with Mike.  If you have a burning desire to do something, a lot of times you have to go beyond what you already see/ have.  Self study, other teachers, maybe a course at your local community college might actually help your math skills.  Lots of teens are entering college these days with insufficient math skills and there are courses to help get them back on track.  Many times these courses can be taken while still in hs or even during the summer. 
       
      A little story.  Once upon a time I wanted to be a science teacher.  I thought I knew everything because I aced chemistry/ physics in high school.  Turns out I was very wrong.  The high school teacher I had never got up from behind his desk and basically let us kids do what ever we wanted for two years.  He didn't care if we ever opened our books and often wrote in test grades based on how we behaved.  Anyway, to make a long story short, I still managed to get a BS degree in the physical sciences four years later but still hadn't really learned it.  It was only when I decided to sit down for a year and teach myself physics and chemistry that I finally learned the basics.  This was years after I was already working in industry and the self teaching occurred at night after work.  I learned enough to pass the teaching tests to become a teacher, and then taught school for five years.  I did end up leaving teaching, but not because of not learning the material.  The point being, if you really want to learn something you can but sometimes you really have to take it on yourself.  
       
      Good luck!
       
      Jon Iverson        
    • Ray Ferriss
      David, Another way to improve your math skills (or any other skill poorly taught by the school system) is to look into the home schooling texts. My brother s
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 1, 2010
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        David,
         
        Another way to improve your math skills (or any other skill poorly taught by the school system) is to look into the home schooling texts.  My brother's family discovered my nieces were at least a year behind in all subjects when they left their school system, but quickly caught up once they had decent materials.
        Regards,
        Ray
        On Wed, Mar 31, 2010 at 2:12 PM, m1i8k3e6 <loughlin3@...> wrote:
         

        David,

        If you want to go into this field, I wouldn't let a perceived lack of "math skills" keep you out of it. Not at your age. A couple of facts, I learned along the way:

        Success in Math is not a matter of "talent". It is mostly a matter of practice and perspiration and persistence.

        Good math teachers are pretty rare, particularly now. Math scores in most public schools have been going down for years.

        You will need to develop self-teaching skills. Math works very well with this approach. Your current teacher and your current book do not own this subject. Go to a used bookstore and for a few dollars you can get a couple of different books on whatever math subject you are taking (or need to re-learn). Some of the older books are probably better than what you were given at school. Read them all. Do all the solved problems in all of your books. Know it backwards and forwards and from a couple of different viewpoints. Your next Math test will be a feast.

        This sounds like a lot of work, and it is. You will be amazed though at some of the doors it opens.

        That shortage of engineers you heard about? Well, that is just what opportunity sounds like.

        Good Luck,

        Mike Loughlin



        --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, David Cohen <joeshebotnik@...> wrote:
        >
        > As a high school student, I completely understand where you are
        > coming from but the problem lies in the fact that school's don't have
        > the resources or the time to get the resources to do anything. A
        > friend of my dad's works a nuclear power plant and he has said that
        > there is going to be a serious problem because people are retiring
        > (people who were at the plants from day one) and are not that many
        > young people going into the nuclear engineering field. That means
        > that we are at one point not going to have a lot of people who know
        > how the plants work and could cause major problems. I would love to
        > go into nuclear science but I don't have the math skills.


      • revtkatt
        David, I was interested in centrifuges a while ago and wanted to see what the secrets are all about. The following are very useful as they contain technical
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 4, 2010
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          David,
          I was interested in centrifuges a while ago and wanted to see
          what the secrets are all about. The following are very
          useful as they contain technical details (both theoretical
          and applied) often omitted in discussions. They also answer
          some questions about News items, like "why are there spirals
          going up those shiny columns Mr. Iran seems to like?" You can
          also find engineering drawings of components. Learn what
          maraging steel is or why bellows are interesting if you want
          to spin magnetically levitated long thin tubes.

          Of of the most amusing twists is that Urenco is selling their
          bearings & rotating-in-vacuum tech for energy-storage flywheels!


          http://www.fas.org/programs/ssp/nukes/fuelcycle/centrifuges/engineering.html

          http://www.fas.org/irp/cia/product/zippe.pdf


          --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, David Cohen <joeshebotnik@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks. That reminds me of this book I found in my school library.
          > Some of you guys may have read it once. It is from the International
          > Series of Monographs on Nuclear Energy and it is titled "Enriched
          > Uranium Processing" by Finis S. Patton, John M. Googin and William L.
          > Griffith from 1963. It has never been checked out so the librarian
          > let me keep it. It's really cool because it has a price chart for
          > uranium 235 "weight fraction" all the way up to May of 1962 along
          > with a chapter called "Plant Design" which includes diagrams and a
          > bunch of stuff like that. I think the book tells you how to build
          > your own uranium enrichment plant but I'm not sure. Does anyone have
          > info about the book?
          > Thanks!
          > David
          > On Mar 31, 2010, at 3:12 PM, m1i8k3e6 wrote:
          >
          > > David,
          > >
          > > If you want to go into this field, I wouldn't let a perceived lack
          > > of "math skills" keep you out of it. Not at your age. A couple of
          > > facts, I learned along the way:
          > >
          > > Success in Math is not a matter of "talent". It is mostly a matter
          > > of practice and perspiration and persistence.
          > >
          > > Good math teachers are pretty rare, particularly now. Math scores
          > > in most public schools have been going down for years.
          > >
          > > You will need to develop self-teaching skills. Math works very well
          > > with this approach. Your current teacher and your current book do
          > > not own this subject. Go to a used bookstore and for a few dollars
          > > you can get a couple of different books on whatever math subject
          > > you are taking (or need to re-learn). Some of the older books are
          > > probably better than what you were given at school. Read them all.
          > > Do all the solved problems in all of your books. Know it backwards
          > > and forwards and from a couple of different viewpoints. Your next
          > > Math test will be a feast.
          > >
          > > This sounds like a lot of work, and it is. You will be amazed
          > > though at some of the doors it opens.
          > >
          > > That shortage of engineers you heard about? Well, that is just what
          > > opportunity sounds like.
          > >
          > > Good Luck,
          > >
          > > Mike Loughlin
          > >
          > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, David Cohen <joeshebotnik@>
          > > wrote:
          > > >
          > > > As a high school student, I completely understand where you are
          > > > coming from but the problem lies in the fact that school's don't
          > > have
          > > > the resources or the time to get the resources to do anything. A
          > > > friend of my dad's works a nuclear power plant and he has said that
          > > > there is going to be a serious problem because people are retiring
          > > > (people who were at the plants from day one) and are not that many
          > > > young people going into the nuclear engineering field. That means
          > > > that we are at one point not going to have a lot of people who know
          > > > how the plants work and could cause major problems. I would love to
          > > > go into nuclear science but I don't have the math skills.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • David Cohen
          Thanks
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 4, 2010
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            Thanks
            On Apr 4, 2010, at 4:25 PM, revtkatt wrote:


            David, 
            I was interested in centrifuges a while ago and wanted to see
            what the secrets are all about. The following are very
            useful as they contain technical details (both theoretical
            and applied) often omitted in discussions. They also answer
            some questions about News items, like "why are there spirals
            going up those shiny columns Mr. Iran seems to like?" You can
            also find engineering drawings of components. Learn what
            maraging steel is or why bellows are interesting if you want
            to spin magnetically levitated long thin tubes.

            Of of the most amusing twists is that Urenco is selling their
            bearings & rotating-in- vacuum tech for energy-storage flywheels!

            http://www.fas. org/programs/ ssp/nukes/ fuelcycle/ centrifuges/ engineering. html

            http://www.fas. org/irp/cia/ product/zippe. pdf

            --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogro ups.com, David Cohen <joeshebotnik@ ...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks. That reminds me of this book I found in my school library. 
            > Some of you guys may have read it once. It is from the International 
            > Series of Monographs on Nuclear Energy and it is titled "Enriched 
            > Uranium Processing" by Finis S. Patton, John M. Googin and William L. 
            > Griffith from 1963. It has never been checked out so the librarian 
            > let me keep it. It's really cool because it has a price chart for 
            > uranium 235 "weight fraction" all the way up to May of 1962 along 
            > with a chapter called "Plant Design" which includes diagrams and a 
            > bunch of stuff like that. I think the book tells you how to build 
            > your own uranium enrichment plant but I'm not sure. Does anyone have 
            > info about the book?
            > Thanks!
            > David
            > On Mar 31, 2010, at 3:12 PM, m1i8k3e6 wrote:
            > 
            > > David,
            > >
            > > If you want to go into this field, I wouldn't let a perceived lack 
            > > of "math skills" keep you out of it. Not at your age. A couple of 
            > > facts, I learned along the way:
            > >
            > > Success in Math is not a matter of "talent". It is mostly a matter 
            > > of practice and perspiration and persistence.
            > >
            > > Good math teachers are pretty rare, particularly now. Math scores 
            > > in most public schools have been going down for years.
            > >
            > > You will need to develop self-teaching skills. Math works very well 
            > > with this approach. Your current teacher and your current book do 
            > > not own this subject. Go to a used bookstore and for a few dollars 
            > > you can get a couple of different books on whatever math subject 
            > > you are taking (or need to re-learn). Some of the older books are 
            > > probably better than what you were given at school. Read them all. 
            > > Do all the solved problems in all of your books. Know it backwards 
            > > and forwards and from a couple of different viewpoints. Your next 
            > > Math test will be a feast.
            > >
            > > This sounds like a lot of work, and it is. You will be amazed 
            > > though at some of the doors it opens.
            > >
            > > That shortage of engineers you heard about? Well, that is just what 
            > > opportunity sounds like.
            > >
            > > Good Luck,
            > >
            > > Mike Loughlin
            > >
            > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogro ups.com, David Cohen <joeshebotnik@ > 
            > > wrote:
            > > >
            > > > As a high school student, I completely understand where you are
            > > > coming from but the problem lies in the fact that school's don't 
            > > have
            > > > the resources or the time to get the resources to do anything. A
            > > > friend of my dad's works a nuclear power plant and he has said that
            > > > there is going to be a serious problem because people are retiring
            > > > (people who were at the plants from day one) and are not that many
            > > > young people going into the nuclear engineering field. That means
            > > > that we are at one point not going to have a lot of people who know
            > > > how the plants work and could cause major problems. I would love to
            > > > go into nuclear science but I don't have the math skills.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >


          • Geo>K0FF
            On Apr 4, 2010, at 4:25 PM, revtkatt wrote: David, I was interested in centrifuges a while ago and wanted to see what the secrets are all about. We had a
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 4, 2010
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              On Apr 4, 2010, at 4:25 PM, revtkatt wrote:


              David, 
              I was interested in centrifuges a while ago and wanted to see
              what the secrets are all about. "

               

              We had a problem with centrifuges a while back. A few millifuges and roaches too. Raid kills them quick.

              Mat Hazard.


            • revtkatt
              ... Sure ... Shame on you! :-) How can you ask what is the goal of replicating a classic experiment? Why bother exposing film, bending betas, observing
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 4, 2010
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                --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, troglodite@... wrote:
                >I think the scale required to produce any quantity of enriched
                > Uranium would discourage most amateurs from considering it.

                Sure

                > Besides, what is the goal?


                Shame on you! :-) How can you ask what is the goal of replicating
                a classic experiment? Why bother exposing film, bending
                betas, observing half lives? Shoot, there's probably a *simulation*
                of all this stuff, so why bother with gadgets that could shock,
                chemicals that aren't kid-safe, pointy tools that could put
                an eye out, etc.

                The goal is amusement.

                Now when you do the math you may find it hard to do anything
                measurable (anyone remember wanting to make neutrons from watch-hands and beryllium?). There, you saved yourself some eBay cash.

                Obviously from the scale and *nasty* chems you wouldn't
                get far with U. "Call for help with remaining lung".

                It is interesting to learn how U enrichment was *detected* when
                the Manhattan guys were trying it. If I gave you a lump and said
                it was enriched, how would you tell? How would you tell with
                1943 tech?

                (PS: Al Q. etc have the same problem on the black market)



                >Simple chemical separation from raw ore was covered on the United
                > Nuclear site some time ago. :-)

                And other sites. "Just ask, man, just ask" --Tyler Durden
                The intellectual challenge of "clandestine uranium chemistry" ie "yellowcake from common household ingredients" is obvious, at least to me.

                Besides, yellowcakers use unsuspicious *hydrous* ammonia... or other uranyl precipitating alkali.


                > All of it is illegal without a license.

                Not clear on small scale, and since neither of us are lawyers..



                It's
                > not a big secret. If you want to build a tactical nuclear device you can
                > find instructions many places, probably even in your school library. However,
                > there are some difficulties involved. :-)

                I recommend the _Los Alamos Primer_
                some equations but excellent explanations and insight into
                working physicists at the time.


                PS: I've never seen _McGuyver_ but from what I've gathered from
                the _Simpsons_ I'd enjoy the tech subplots.
              • troglodite@aol.com
                In a message dated 4/4/2010 2:51:34 P.M. Central Standard Time, ... Shame on you! :-) How can you ask what is the goal of replicating a classic experiment?
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 5, 2010
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                  In a message dated 4/4/2010 2:51:34 P.M. Central Standard Time, revtkatt@... writes:
                  > Besides, what is the goal?


                  Shame on you!  :-)  How can you ask what is the goal of replicating
                  a classic experiment?   Why bother exposing film, bending
                  betas, observing half lives?  Shoot, there's probably a *simulation*
                  of all this stuff, so why bother with gadgets that could shock,
                  chemicals that aren't kid-safe, pointy tools that could put
                  an eye out, etc.
                  I think you missed my point. But no matter.
                   
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