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Re: [CDV700CLUB] How long to charge dosimeters

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  • Tom Herman
    Earl, They should charge instantaneously. Be advised that the charging contact sometimes doesn t make good contact, so you may have to press down and wiggle
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 1, 2009
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      Earl,
       
        They should charge instantaneously. Be advised that the charging contact sometimes doesn't make good contact, so you may have to press down and wiggle it, then move the potentiometer.
        You're simply storing a minute electrical charge, not trying to charge up a large capacitor.
        Also, the old 742's can be leaky... Don't be surprised if they go belly up on you in a short amount of time due to corrosion and contamination (some of which I suspect is internal and you can't do anything about).
        IIRC, the specs say that after a month the dosimeter should retain 95% of its charge (I'm sure someone will chime in and correct me on this).
        Expect most to go dead in a matter of hours to days.
       
      -Tom
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, August 31, 2009 6:05 PM
      Subject: Re: [CDV700CLUB] How long to charge dosimeters

       

      750 jordon charger and 742 vic  dosimeter


      From: Chris Cavanaugh <cav427@...>
      To: CDV700CLUB@yahoogro ups.com
      Sent: Monday, August 31, 2009 7:56:07 PM
      Subject: Re: [CDV700CLUB] How long to charge dosimeters

       

      What type dosimeter and what type charger?
       
      Chris Cavanaugh
      cav427@...
      Yukon, OK
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, August 31, 2009 6:52 PM
      Subject: [CDV700CLUB] How long to charge dosimeters

       

      How long do the dosimeters need chargering or how long
      does the charge last in the dosimeter after being fully
      charged?

    • troglodite@aol.com
      In a message dated 9/1/2009 7:16:39 A.M. Central Standard Time, n1bec@msn.com writes: Expect most to go dead in a matter of hours to days. Would this read the
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 1, 2009
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        In a message dated 9/1/2009 7:16:39 A.M. Central Standard Time, n1bec@... writes:
          Expect most to go dead in a matter of hours to days.
        Would this read the same as an exposure to high levels of radiation? If so, how would one know the difference between a leaky detector and a potentially dangerous exposure? I suppose the only way would be regular testing of the dosimeters in a shielded enclosure.
         
      • James Darrough
        Are you talking about PIC s (the round tubular dosimeters)? If so, we zero ours, then irradiate them to 100mR and put them in a lead cave for a week. If they
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 1, 2009
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          Are you talking about PIC’s (the round tubular dosimeters)? If so, we zero ours, then irradiate them to 100mR and put them in a lead “cave” for a week. If they drift more than 10% (or were off by more than 10% when we irradiated them) they are rejected.

           

          Regards, Jim Darrough

           

          From: CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of freedom2503
          Sent: Monday, August 31, 2009 4:53 PM
          To: CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [CDV700CLUB] How long to charge dosimeters

           

           

          How long do the dosimeters need chargering or how long
          does the charge last in the dosimeter after being fully
          charged?

        • Tom Herman
          Doug, I guess you bundle them all up together... That way, they would theoretically all get about the same dose. If you have one or two that slowly discharge,
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 1, 2009
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            Doug,
             
              I guess you bundle them all up together... That way, they would theoretically all get about the same dose.
              If you have one or two that slowly discharge, while the others all go dead fast, it would be indicative of failures in the majority of the 742's.
              By virtue of still being alive, it would rule out the slow discharging units as being defective....
             
            -Tom
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Tuesday, September 01, 2009 6:34 AM
            Subject: Re: [CDV700CLUB] How long to charge dosimeters

             

            In a message dated 9/1/2009 7:16:39 A.M. Central Standard Time, n1bec@... writes:
              Expect most to go dead in a matter of hours to days.
            Would this read the same as an exposure to high levels of radiation? If so, how would one know the difference between a leaky detector and a potentially dangerous exposure? I suppose the only way would be regular testing of the dosimeters in a shielded enclosure.
             

          • troglodite@aol.com
            In a message dated 9/1/2009 11:01:44 P.M. Central Standard Time, n1bec@msn.com writes: I guess you bundle them all up together... That way, they would
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 2, 2009
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              In a message dated 9/1/2009 11:01:44 P.M. Central Standard Time, n1bec@... writes:
                I guess you bundle them all up together... That way, they would theoretically all get about the same dose.
                If you have one or two that slowly discharge, while the others all go dead fast, it would be indicative of failures in the majority of the 742's.
                By virtue of still being alive, it would rule out the slow discharging units as being defective....
              Tom,
               
                  Thanks for that info. I don't actually use these things, I was just curious as to how one insured they were working correctly. Regular testing appears to be the key.
               
                  I had my exposure crisis many years ago when as a teenager I dabbled with X-rays. A film badge service probably saved me from serious problems. It's a long story I've told here before so it's not worth repeating. Suffice it to say I am wiser by the experience and will never make those mistakes again.
               
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