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Re: [CDV700CLUB] Re: Dummies Guide to Radioactive Water

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  • Ken Sejkora
    Hi Gary, I made a mistake in my original statement.  The average American get about 360 mrem per year from all sources or radiaiton exposure, and about 55% of
    Message 1 of 79 , Jan 1, 2009
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      Hi Gary,
      I made a mistake in my original statement.  The average American get about 360 mrem per year from all sources or radiaiton exposure, and about 55% of that (around 200 mrem/yr) comes from radon exposure alone.  Here's a good link to a dose estimator:

      http://www.ans.org/pi/resources/dosechart/

      See my other response to Bob, which goes into more detail.

      Ken

      --- On Wed, 12/31/08, hitlong <hitlong@...> wrote:
      From: hitlong <hitlong@...>
      Subject: [CDV700CLUB] Re: Dummies Guide to Radioactive Water
      To: CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, December 31, 2008, 8:28 AM

      --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogro ups.com, Ken Sejkora <quickhatch44@ ...>
      wrote:
      >
      > The dose consequence from natural and weapons-related tritium
      > in water is minuscule, probably less than 0.01 mrem/year,
      > which is nothing compared to the 300 to 400 mrem/yr you get
      > from radon in air (higher if you have an air-tight energy
      > efficient house), ....

      Hi Ken,

      I thought the dose from radon would be lower. How many pCi/L
      corresponds to your number?

      Gary

      ,___

    • Chey Zullo
      Nuclear physics and chemistry is very interesting in discovery of knowledge.. Maybe one day countries can make miniture nuclear radioactivity that explodes
      Message 79 of 79 , Jan 6, 2009
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        Nuclear physics and chemistry is very interesting in discovery of knowledge. Maybe one day countries can make miniture nuclear radioactivity that explodes less and leaves lethal doses of invisaible radioactivety.  Disbursing through the air and radius of a a square mile? The future is a mystery... looks for the ghost of christmas past....? maybe not such a good combo...prosititution of physics and nuclear weapons


        From: Craig <siliconhillbilly@...>
        To: CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2008 4:33:52 PM
        Subject: [CDV700CLUB] Re: Miniature Nuclear Reactors to Be on Sale Within 5 Years

        The uranium hydride reactor concept uses hydrogen, combined with
        uranium in the form of uranium hydride, as the moderator. It is filled
        with pressurized H2 just before going into operation. If the H2 leaks
        out, the reactor goes sub-critical and stops. Power output follows
        the temperature in the pressure vessel; hotter fuel desorbes the
        hydrogen from the U-hydride and therefore lowers moderation and slows
        the reaction. If you remove more heat, the reaction speed increases.
        So it is a load following design with no moving parts. I believe
        the heat exchanger is submerged in the H2 gas. I suppose other types
        of heat removal are possible.
        No water and no pumps produce a very reliable design. It can't be
        made with much larger power output than quoted without the addition of
        active heat removal equipment. That would eliminate the "hands off"
        feature that is so compelling.

        Craig

        --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogro ups.com, "DH" <revtkatt@.. .> wrote:

        >
        >
        > This kind of idea --the disposable minireactor- -
        > has been around a while. It would be great if it
        > takes off.
        >
        > The one you pointed to seemed to use H2 so it uses hot
        > air turbines? There's also a pebble bed design that uses
        > helium as the working fluid IIRC.
        >
        >
        >
        > This part:
        >
        > >>The reactor uses a uranium hydride core, surrounded by hydrogen gas.
        > The fuel is not enriched to weapons-grade, meaning it can't be used
        > for building a nuclear device.<<
        >
        > implies that it uses the H in UH to moderate --like the TRIGA--
        > so if it gets too hot it stops moderating and stops
        > reacting. That's a passive safety feature
        preventing meltdown.
        > Pretty cool exploitation of physics.
        >
        > Non weapons grade means you can't rapidly assemble it into
        > a fast-neutron supercritical lump. Basically its not enriched
        > enough.
        >
        > You can still make a big mess of it (shaped charge breaching)
        > or extract RDD materials. But you can do as much at a chemical
        > factory.
        >


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