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a bit of history of granite.

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  • robertdruecker@msn.com
    while were still on granite, I looked up history of granite on internet. one company started in 1889, with gray structural granite, for monuments, buildings
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 1, 2008
      while were still on granite, I looked up history of  granite on internet. one company started in 1889, with gray structural granite, for monuments, buildings etc. our companies were undercut by italy and spain.  they now have 70% of structural granite, and 90% of tiles and countertop granite markets.  most of U.S. companies closed down during the depression, and during WW11, they switched to steel production for war effort.  most of our modern countertops, including the samples I  have were imported from Italy.  I cant find out where granite tombstones came from during the depression, or WW11. cant find out why some colored granite is radioactive, and also some tombstones and building granite are, while others aren't. see you bob
    • DH
      ... internet. one company started in 1889, with gray structural granite, for monuments, buildings etc. our companies were undercut by italy and spain.
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 1, 2008
        --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, <robertdruecker@...> wrote:
        >
        > while were still on granite, I looked up history of granite on
        internet. one company started in 1889, with gray structural granite,
        for monuments, buildings etc. our companies were undercut by italy and
        spain.

        Interesting. I suppose ship transport of granite is free if you
        consider it required ballast.

        Look up 'pegmatite' (a coarse variety of granite occurring in dikes or
        veins), in some east coast granites they find uraninite crystals!
      • Boomologist
        The Autunite in our mine is found on and in Granite Pegmatite. Thanks, Ron
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 1, 2008
          The Autunite in our mine is found on and in Granite Pegmatite.
           
           
                                      Thanks,
                                             Ron

        • robertdruecker@msn.com
          ron, I m thinking that granite was enriched with uranium, in the same way that the chattanooga shale was. the shale was layers of volcanic ash, and the granite
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 1, 2008
            ron, I'm thinking that granite was enriched with uranium, in the same way that the chattanooga shale was. the shale was layers of volcanic ash, and the granite was molten lava. the energy citation for the shale says that uranium enrichment of the shales is explained by  the introduction  of this element from the field of drift of the terrigenic materials. possibly the lava shifted through uranium fields also. some shales contacted the uranium and  and others didn't.  it's as good a theory as any.  bob
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Friday, August 01, 2008 12:22 PM
            Subject: Re: [CDV700CLUB] Re: a bit of history of granite.

            The Autunite in our mine is found on and in Granite Pegmatite.
             
             
                                        Thanks,
                                               Ron

          • Steve Poterala
            It has to do with partitioning of different elements into the magma that formed the granite (not lava unless it s on the surface). When a magma forms from a
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 1, 2008
              It has to do with partitioning of different elements into the magma that
              formed the granite (not lava unless it's on the surface). When a magma
              forms from a melting parent rock, or alternately when a rock
              crystallizes from magma, different elements will partition themselves
              between the magma and the crystallizing minerals - there are partition
              coefficients for each element between a particular magma composition and
              a particular mineral. Elements are broadly classified as "compatible"
              or "incompatible" based on these partition coefficients. To put it
              simply, "compatible" elements fit into the common rock forming minerals,
              while "incompatible" elements don't and stay in the magma. Now,
              granites are generally understood to form from partial melting of more
              mafic (silica-poor) rocks. Incompatible elements will favorably
              partition into the magma out of the source rock. Then when the magma
              crystallizes, the most felsic parts (the silica rich parts that form
              granites and syenites) crystallize last, at the lowest temperature.
              Thus the granites likely make up a small portion of the original source
              rock but are enriched in the "incompatible" elements. These
              incompatible elements are mostly those with very small or very large
              ionic radii, and large charge (ex: U, Th, B, Be, Li, Nb, Ta, REE,
              etc). Pegmatites are an extreme case of this - they form from the very
              last bit of the magma that crystallizes, and are much more strongly
              concentrated in the incompatible elements. Hence primary (crystallized
              from magma) radioactive minerals are more concentrated in pegmatites and
              granites. Felsic volcanic ash (the same chemistry as a granite but made
              it to the Earth's surface) would be likewise U-rich.

              Steve

              robertdruecker@... wrote:
              >
              > ron, I'm thinking that granite was enriched with uranium, in the same
              > way that the chattanooga shale was. the shale was layers of volcanic
              > ash, and the granite was molten lava. the energy citation for the
              > shale says that uranium enrichment of the shales is explained by the
              > introduction of this element from the field of drift of the
              > terrigenic materials. possibly the lava shifted through uranium fields
              > also. some shales contacted the uranium and and others didn't. it's
              > as good a theory as any. bob
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > *From:* Boomologist <mailto:Boomologist@...>
              > *To:* CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com <mailto:CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com>
              > *Sent:* Friday, August 01, 2008 12:22 PM
              > *Subject:* Re: [CDV700CLUB] Re: a bit of history of granite.
              >
              > The Autunite in our mine is found on and in Granite Pegmatite.
              >
              >
              > Thanks,
              > Ron
              >
              >


              --
              Stephen Poterala
              MatSE Graduate Student
              7B Steidle - The Messing Research Group
              The Pennsylvania State University
            • robertdruecker@msn.com
              good job steve. finally we have an explanation that even I can understand, and it makes sence. after I sent the e-mail, I realized that I had said lava. I
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 1, 2008
                good job steve. finally we have an explanation that even I can understand, and it makes sence.  after I sent the e-mail, I realized that I had said lava.  I did mean molten rock that hadn't reached the surface, and hardened deep in the earth. thanks bob
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Friday, August 01, 2008 4:42 PM
                Subject: Re: [CDV700CLUB] Re: a bit of history of granite.

                It has to do with partitioning of different elements into the magma that
                formed the granite (not lava unless it's on the surface). When a magma
                forms from a melting parent rock, or alternately when a rock
                crystallizes from magma, different elements will partition themselves
                between the magma and the crystallizing minerals - there are partition
                coefficients for each element between a particular magma composition and
                a particular mineral. Elements are broadly classified as "compatible"
                or "incompatible" based on these partition coefficients. To put it
                simply, "compatible" elements fit into the common rock forming minerals,
                while "incompatible" elements don't and stay in the magma. Now,
                granites are generally understood to form from partial melting of more
                mafic (silica-poor) rocks. Incompatible elements will favorably
                partition into the magma out of the source rock. Then when the magma
                crystallizes, the most felsic parts (the silica rich parts that form
                granites and syenites) crystallize last, at the lowest temperature.
                Thus the granites likely make up a small portion of the original source
                rock but are enriched in the "incompatible" elements. These
                incompatible elements are mostly those with very small or very large
                ionic radii, and large charge (ex: U, Th, B, Be, Li, Nb, Ta, REE,
                etc). Pegmatites are an extreme case of this - they form from the very
                last bit of the magma that crystallizes, and are much more strongly
                concentrated in the incompatible elements. Hence primary (crystallized
                from magma) radioactive minerals are more concentrated in pegmatites and
                granites. Felsic volcanic ash (the same chemistry as a granite but made
                it to the Earth's surface) would be likewise U-rich.

                Steve

                robertdruecker@ msn.com wrote:
                >
                > ron, I'm thinking that granite was enriched with uranium, in the same
                > way that the chattanooga shale was. the shale was layers of volcanic
                > ash, and the granite was molten lava. the energy citation for the
                > shale says that uranium enrichment of the shales is explained by the
                > introduction of this element from the field of drift of the
                > terrigenic materials. possibly the lava shifted through uranium fields
                > also. some shales contacted the uranium and and others didn't. it's
                > as good a theory as any. bob
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > *From:* Boomologist <mailto:Boomologist@ GotHotRocks. com>
                > *To:* CDV700CLUB@yahoogro ups.com <mailto:CDV700CLUB@yahoogro ups.com>
                > *Sent:* Friday, August 01, 2008 12:22 PM
                > *Subject:* Re: [CDV700CLUB] Re: a bit of history of granite.
                >
                > The Autunite in our mine is found on and in Granite Pegmatite.
                >
                >
                > Thanks,
                > Ron
                >
                >

                --
                Stephen Poterala
                MatSE Graduate Student
                7B Steidle - The Messing Research Group
                The Pennsylvania State University

              • DH
                Guys, in many cases, the lava/tuff layers are rinsed by freshwater which dissolves uranium salts in the lava and deposits it elsewhere. Often,
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 1, 2008
                  Guys,
                  in many cases, the lava/tuff layers are rinsed by
                  freshwater which dissolves uranium salts in the lava
                  and deposits it elsewhere. Often, reduction/oxidation
                  chemistry matters, see "roll fronts".

                  The rocks of tennessee are sedimentary clays
                  brought by that big ole river you have. That they
                  should have above or below 'background' U is not
                  surprising.

                  It is indeed fascinating how various chemical, physical
                  (eg gold particles) and biological (some ores) processes
                  concentrate materials. Very fortunate for our species
                  but hardly surprising.
                • robertdruecker@msn.com
                  I don t want to seem ignorant, but isn t it possible that much of tennessee was once covered by ocean, and the sedementary rocks are rich in sea life, dating
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 2, 2008
                    I don't want to seem ignorant, but isn't it possible that much of tennessee was once covered by ocean, and the sedementary rocks are rich in sea life, dating back to before cambrian through the devonian period. that there was at least 4 volcanic eruptions way prior to the continents seperating.  ole man river couldn't have done all that. bob
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: DH
                    Sent: Friday, August 01, 2008 11:50 PM
                    Subject: [CDV700CLUB] Re: a bit of history of granite.


                    Guys,
                    in many cases, the lava/tuff layers are rinsed by
                    freshwater which dissolves uranium salts in the lava
                    and deposits it elsewhere. Often, reduction/oxidation
                    chemistry matters, see "roll fronts".

                    The rocks of tennessee are sedimentary clays
                    brought by that big ole river you have. That they
                    should have above or below 'background' U is not
                    surprising.

                    It is indeed fascinating how various chemical, physical
                    (eg gold particles) and biological (some ores) processes
                    concentrate materials. Very fortunate for our species
                    but hardly surprising.

                  • DH
                    ... tennessee was once covered by ocean, and the sedementary rocks are rich in sea life, dating back to before cambrian through the devonian period. that there
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 2, 2008
                      --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, <robertdruecker@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I don't want to seem ignorant, but isn't it possible that much of
                      tennessee was once covered by ocean, and the sedementary rocks are
                      rich in sea life, dating back to before cambrian through the devonian
                      period. that there was at least 4 volcanic eruptions way prior to the
                      continents seperating. ole man river couldn't have done all that. bob

                      I'll stick to what I wrote about U migration, but defer to
                      real geologists about Tenn.
                    • Steve Poterala
                      Yes, much of TN was covered by ocean at one time (Devonian is correct - this is when the Chattanooga shale was deposited. Most all the sedimentary rocks
                      Message 10 of 11 , Aug 2, 2008
                        Yes, much of TN was covered by ocean at one time (Devonian is correct -
                        this is when the Chattanooga shale was deposited. Most all the
                        sedimentary rocks exposed in eastern/central TN are around this same age
                        - they formed from sediments carried westward from the Appalachian
                        mountains, which were much more majestic at the time). As was mentioned
                        U is often concentrated by changes in chemistry (reduction/oxidation) -
                        coal is often U rich because it is formed in a reducing environment
                        (coal swamp) - U present in the water is precipitated & is concentrated
                        over time. This is a topic that has been argued by geologists however -
                        and I'm not completely sure if this is the reason for U in the
                        Chattanooga shale, but I think it's a good possibility. The idea that U
                        in the Chattanooga originated from volcanic ash is very unlikely,
                        because the composition/mineralogy is not consistent w/ volcanic ash
                        deposits.

                        Most commercial U deposits are formed in porous rocks (sandstone etc)
                        when U is precipitated from groundwater due to changes in chemistry
                        (i.e. reducing vs. oxidizing).

                        Steve

                        DH wrote:
                        >
                        > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com
                        > <mailto:CDV700CLUB%40yahoogroups.com>, <robertdruecker@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > I don't want to seem ignorant, but isn't it possible that much of
                        > tennessee was once covered by ocean, and the sedementary rocks are
                        > rich in sea life, dating back to before cambrian through the devonian
                        > period. that there was at least 4 volcanic eruptions way prior to the
                        > continents seperating. ole man river couldn't have done all that. bob
                        >
                        > I'll stick to what I wrote about U migration, but defer to
                        > real geologists about Tenn.
                        >
                        >
                      • robertdruecker@msn.com
                        sure would like to have a piece of RA coal. the OSTI report on the chattanooga shale thinks it was enriched from the field of drift of the terrigenic material
                        Message 11 of 11 , Aug 2, 2008
                          sure would like to have a piece of RA coal. the OSTI report on the chattanooga shale thinks it was enriched from the field of drift of the terrigenic  material .layers of volcanic ash had continental weathering and washout. OSTI iD is 5977037. the Fort Payne above the shale, and underneith and the strata underneith of it show no uranium enrichment.  cool business right!   bob
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Saturday, August 02, 2008 3:34 PM
                          Subject: Re: [CDV700CLUB] Re: a bit of history of granite.

                          Yes, much of TN was covered by ocean at one time (Devonian is correct -
                          this is when the Chattanooga shale was deposited. Most all the
                          sedimentary rocks exposed in eastern/central TN are around this same age
                          - they formed from sediments carried westward from the Appalachian
                          mountains, which were much more majestic at the time). As was mentioned
                          U is often concentrated by changes in chemistry (reduction/oxidatio n) -
                          coal is often U rich because it is formed in a reducing environment
                          (coal swamp) - U present in the water is precipitated & is concentrated
                          over time. This is a topic that has been argued by geologists however -
                          and I'm not completely sure if this is the reason for U in the
                          Chattanooga shale, but I think it's a good possibility. The idea that U
                          in the Chattanooga originated from volcanic ash is very unlikely,
                          because the composition/ mineralogy is not consistent w/ volcanic ash
                          deposits.

                          Most commercial U deposits are formed in porous rocks (sandstone etc)
                          when U is precipitated from groundwater due to changes in chemistry
                          (i.e. reducing vs. oxidizing).

                          Steve

                          DH wrote:
                          >
                          > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogro ups.com
                          > <mailto:CDV700CLUB% 40yahoogroups. com>, <robertdruecker@ ...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > I don't want to seem ignorant, but isn't it possible that much of
                          > tennessee was once covered by ocean, and the sedementary rocks are
                          > rich in sea life, dating back to before cambrian through the devonian
                          > period. that there was at least 4 volcanic eruptions way prior to the
                          > continents seperating. ole man river couldn't have done all that. bob
                          >
                          > I'll stick to what I wrote about U migration, but defer to
                          > real geologists about Tenn.
                          >
                          >

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