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Re: 7616 Military Tube

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  • Dave
    Don t forget the 64K upgrades for $400 for the TRS-80 s..... and some storage trivia... http://www.littletechshoppe.com/ns1625/winchest.html Dave ...
    Message 1 of 20 , Dec 1, 2003
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      Don't forget the 64K upgrades for $400 for the TRS-80's.....

      and some storage trivia...

      http://www.littletechshoppe.com/ns1625/winchest.html

      Dave

      --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, Jay S Boggess <jsboggess@j...>
      wrote:
      > > revtkatt@y... wrote:
      > >
      > > "When the rotary telephone first came out, people
      > > said, 'You mean I have to dial seven numbers?' "
      > >
      >
      > This reminds of a story my co-worker Andy tells. He was in
      elementary
      > school when the first Radio Shack TRS-80 computers came out - with
      4K of
      > memory, saving your programs on cassette tape and all. Then one
      day,
      > Andy's school got brand-new TRS-80's with SIXTEEN K of memory and
      all
      > Andy could say was "What could you POSSIBLY do with 16K of
      memory???"
      >
      > jay boggess
    • Ron Schwarz
      ... You re thinking of the *16* KB upgrades. I got my second two 16K upgrades from a second-source for the mere sum of $79 *each* (for a total of 32
      Message 2 of 20 , Dec 1, 2003
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        At 01:29 PM 12/1/2003 -0000, Dave said:
        >Don't forget the 64K upgrades for $400 for the TRS-80's.....

        You're thinking of the *16* KB upgrades. I got my second two 16K upgrades
        from a second-source for the mere sum of $79 *each* (for a total of 32
        KILObytes), maxing out my system at 48KB (the rest of the Z80's address
        space was reserved for memory-mapped I/O).

        The $79 price was *so* low that I was very worried that it was a scam,
        until the chips arrived, and *worked*. (I even worried that they were scrap
        chips, until I'd actually plugged them into my Expansion Interface and
        fired up the beast. The price was *that* low...)

        Then there's the $695 I spent for my first floppy drive, a SSSD 35 track,
        89 KB Shugart with a mid-cable-wart power supply. (Or was it a mega-size
        wall-wart? Oh, the decades...)

        My next drive was a 40 track MPI that sounded like a machinegun when the
        head stepper motor engaged, because the FDC was hardwired (at least "hard
        firm-wired") to send out stepping signals at the rate the ultra-slow
        Shugart's plastic flat-worm-wheel could tolerate. When I finally managed
        to get a patch to let me tweak the step rate, the MPI was nearly silent
        when it positioned the head, just a quiet whoosh-whoosh, like smooth metal
        sliding on smooth metal. (The MPI used a metal band that wound around a
        wheel on the stepper motor, which directly drove the head carriage.)

        I eventually ended up with four half-height Mitsubishis, 80 track double
        density, 720 KB each (the later 720KB 3.5" drives were virtual equivalents
        except for media size), and I was in hog heaven.

        Then, I added the Mumford Micro Systems turbo kit, and blew out its brains.
        Ow. We needed that beast to run the estimates and billing for our
        wholesale camera repair shop! It had survived the lowercase upgrade I
        kludged in using Dennis Bathory Kitsz's samizdat newsletter, and the
        double-density FDC daughterboard I squeezed in, so I figured why not speed
        it up a bit? I guess expecting a 2.5 megahertz clock rate out of it was
        more than it could stand.

        We ended up racing down to the local ratshack and buying a Model 4, which
        they'd had on (modest) sale. It was *incredibly* reliable compared to the
        Model 1, which had gone in for warranty service SIXTEEN times (including
        five mainboard changes during the times they had to send it all the way to
        Texas) -- and it *still* needed the occaisional whack on the side
        (literally, and several times a day) to "unstick" it when it locked up.
        Sometimes, I'd have to reach back for the reset button, and sometimes I'd
        have to power-down.

        They did NOT engineer a whole lot of reliability into that design.

        The only problem with the Model 4 was the power supply burning out (after
        warranty expiration, natch). I found a surplus linear supply that fit in
        the box (I drilled holes in the cabinet floor to mount it) and it worked
        happily ever after, even after I replaced the stock drives with my four
        half-height Mitsubishis. I've still got it somewhere, in fact.

        Ah, memories...

        (Maybe it's just this damn flu dredging 'em up though. Ugh.)




        --
        Rare Stuff: http://www.clubvb.com
      • Dave
        They were 64K upgrades, as we uses TRS-80 CoCo s in college because RS was the only one incorporating Extended Basic needed for our programming courses. The
        Message 3 of 20 , Dec 1, 2003
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          They were 64K upgrades, as we uses TRS-80 CoCo's in college because
          RS was the only one incorporating Extended Basic needed for our
          programming courses. The Model 4's were already on their way out at
          the time....
          We were still ahead of the business guy's with their punch cards....
          Chicklet keyboards were awful....but a solid machine....6809e
          processor, 1mHz oc'd to 2mHz....poke something....
          Dave
          (still have the original 16K chips somewhere)

          --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, Ron Schwarz <rs@c...> wrote:
          > At 01:29 PM 12/1/2003 -0000, Dave said:
          > >Don't forget the 64K upgrades for $400 for the TRS-80's.....
          >
          > You're thinking of the *16* KB upgrades. I got my second two 16K
          upgrades
          > from a second-source for the mere sum of $79 *each* (for a total
          of 32
          > KILObytes), maxing out my system at 48KB (the rest of the Z80's
          address
          > space was reserved for memory-mapped I/O).
          >
          > The $79 price was *so* low that I was very worried that it was a
          scam,
          > until the chips arrived, and *worked*. (I even worried that they
          were scrap
          > chips, until I'd actually plugged them into my Expansion Interface
          and
          > fired up the beast. The price was *that* low...)
          >
          > Then there's the $695 I spent for my first floppy drive, a SSSD 35
          track,
          > 89 KB Shugart with a mid-cable-wart power supply. (Or was it a
          mega-size
          > wall-wart? Oh, the decades...)
          >
          > My next drive was a 40 track MPI that sounded like a machinegun
          when the
          > head stepper motor engaged, because the FDC was hardwired (at
          least "hard
          > firm-wired") to send out stepping signals at the rate the ultra-
          slow
          > Shugart's plastic flat-worm-wheel could tolerate. When I finally
          managed
          > to get a patch to let me tweak the step rate, the MPI was nearly
          silent
          > when it positioned the head, just a quiet whoosh-whoosh, like
          smooth metal
          > sliding on smooth metal. (The MPI used a metal band that wound
          around a
          > wheel on the stepper motor, which directly drove the head
          carriage.)
          >
          > I eventually ended up with four half-height Mitsubishis, 80 track
          double
          > density, 720 KB each (the later 720KB 3.5" drives were virtual
          equivalents
          > except for media size), and I was in hog heaven.
          >
          > Then, I added the Mumford Micro Systems turbo kit, and blew out
          its brains.
          > Ow. We needed that beast to run the estimates and billing for our
          > wholesale camera repair shop! It had survived the lowercase
          upgrade I
          > kludged in using Dennis Bathory Kitsz's samizdat newsletter, and
          the
          > double-density FDC daughterboard I squeezed in, so I figured why
          not speed
          > it up a bit? I guess expecting a 2.5 megahertz clock rate out of
          it was
          > more than it could stand.
          >
          > We ended up racing down to the local ratshack and buying a Model
          4, which
          > they'd had on (modest) sale. It was *incredibly* reliable
          compared to the
          > Model 1, which had gone in for warranty service SIXTEEN times
          (including
          > five mainboard changes during the times they had to send it all
          the way to
          > Texas) -- and it *still* needed the occaisional whack on the side
          > (literally, and several times a day) to "unstick" it when it
          locked up.
          > Sometimes, I'd have to reach back for the reset button, and
          sometimes I'd
          > have to power-down.
          >
          > They did NOT engineer a whole lot of reliability into that design.
          >
          > The only problem with the Model 4 was the power supply burning out
          (after
          > warranty expiration, natch). I found a surplus linear supply that
          fit in
          > the box (I drilled holes in the cabinet floor to mount it) and it
          worked
          > happily ever after, even after I replaced the stock drives with my
          four
          > half-height Mitsubishis. I've still got it somewhere, in fact.
          >
          > Ah, memories...
          >
          > (Maybe it's just this damn flu dredging 'em up though. Ugh.)
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > Rare Stuff: http://www.clubvb.com
        • John Boyle
          Dave, I gotta jump in on this one. Did you ever see the tiny printer/plotter with ballpoint pens RatSack sold for the CoCo? BTW, the noble Zilog Z-80 and Z-80A
          Message 4 of 20 , Dec 2, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            Dave,
            I gotta jump in on this one.
            Did you ever see the tiny printer/plotter with ballpoint pens RatSack
            sold for the CoCo?

            BTW, the noble Zilog Z-80 and Z-80A are still readilly available!
            Regression, anyone?

            John



            > They were 64K upgrades, as we uses TRS-80 CoCo's in college because
            > RS was the only one incorporating Extended Basic needed for our
            > programming courses. The Model 4's were already on their way out at
            > the time....
            > We were still ahead of the business guy's with their punch cards....
            > Chicklet keyboards were awful....but a solid machine....6809e
            > processor, 1mHz oc'd to 2mHz....poke something....
            > Dave
            > (still have the original 16K chips somewhere)
            >
            > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, Ron Schwarz <rs@c...> wrote:
            > > At 01:29 PM 12/1/2003 -0000, Dave said:
            > > >Don't forget the 64K upgrades for $400 for the TRS-80's.....
            > >
            > > You're thinking of the *16* KB upgrades. I got my second two 16K
            > upgrades
            > > from a second-source for the mere sum of $79 *each* (for a total
            > of 32
            > > KILObytes), maxing out my system at 48KB (the rest of the Z80's
            > address
            > > space was reserved for memory-mapped I/O).
            > >
            > > The $79 price was *so* low that I was very worried that it was a
            > scam,
            > > until the chips arrived, and *worked*. (I even worried that they
            > were scrap
            > > chips, until I'd actually plugged them into my Expansion Interface
            > and
            > > fired up the beast. The price was *that* low...)
            > >
            > > Then there's the $695 I spent for my first floppy drive, a SSSD 35
            > track,
            > > 89 KB Shugart with a mid-cable-wart power supply. (Or was it a
            > mega-size
            > > wall-wart? Oh, the decades...)
            > >
            > > My next drive was a 40 track MPI that sounded like a machinegun
            > when the
            > > head stepper motor engaged, because the FDC was hardwired (at
            > least "hard
            > > firm-wired") to send out stepping signals at the rate the ultra-
            > slow
            > > Shugart's plastic flat-worm-wheel could tolerate. When I finally
            > managed
            > > to get a patch to let me tweak the step rate, the MPI was nearly
            > silent
            > > when it positioned the head, just a quiet whoosh-whoosh, like
            > smooth metal
            > > sliding on smooth metal. (The MPI used a metal band that wound
            > around a
            > > wheel on the stepper motor, which directly drove the head
            > carriage.)
            > >
            > > I eventually ended up with four half-height Mitsubishis, 80 track
            > double
            > > density, 720 KB each (the later 720KB 3.5" drives were virtual
            > equivalents
            > > except for media size), and I was in hog heaven.
            > >
            > > Then, I added the Mumford Micro Systems turbo kit, and blew out
            > its brains.
            > > Ow. We needed that beast to run the estimates and billing for our
            > > wholesale camera repair shop! It had survived the lowercase
            > upgrade I
            > > kludged in using Dennis Bathory Kitsz's samizdat newsletter, and
            > the
            > > double-density FDC daughterboard I squeezed in, so I figured why
            > not speed
            > > it up a bit? I guess expecting a 2.5 megahertz clock rate out of
            > it was
            > > more than it could stand.
            > >
            > > We ended up racing down to the local ratshack and buying a Model
            > 4, which
            > > they'd had on (modest) sale. It was *incredibly* reliable
            > compared to the
            > > Model 1, which had gone in for warranty service SIXTEEN times
            > (including
            > > five mainboard changes during the times they had to send it all
            > the way to
            > > Texas) -- and it *still* needed the occaisional whack on the side
            > > (literally, and several times a day) to "unstick" it when it
            > locked up.
            > > Sometimes, I'd have to reach back for the reset button, and
            > sometimes I'd
            > > have to power-down.
            > >
            > > They did NOT engineer a whole lot of reliability into that design.
            > >
            > > The only problem with the Model 4 was the power supply burning out
            > (after
            > > warranty expiration, natch). I found a surplus linear supply that
            > fit in
            > > the box (I drilled holes in the cabinet floor to mount it) and it
            > worked
            > > happily ever after, even after I replaced the stock drives with my
            > four
            > > half-height Mitsubishis. I've still got it somewhere, in fact.
            > >
            > > Ah, memories...
            > >
            > > (Maybe it's just this damn flu dredging 'em up though. Ugh.)
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --
            > > Rare Stuff: http://www.clubvb.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Community email addresses:
            > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
            > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
            > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
            > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
            >
            > Shortcut URL to this page:
            > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
          • Dave
            John, if memory serves me right, it was the TRS-80 CCP-115 Pen Plotter produced for a short time and way too expensive for me to purchase at the time. I think
            Message 5 of 20 , Dec 2, 2003
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              John, if memory serves me right, it was the TRS-80 CCP-115 Pen
              Plotter produced for a short time and way too expensive for me to
              purchase at the time. I think the ad showed and etch-a-sketch type
              graphic being plotted on it. Pretty rare now, esp. the pens......
              Dave

              --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "John Boyle" <kb3cny@a...> wrote:
              >
              > Dave,
              > I gotta jump in on this one.
              > Did you ever see the tiny printer/plotter with ballpoint pens
              RatSack
              > sold for the CoCo?
              >
              > BTW, the noble Zilog Z-80 and Z-80A are still readilly available!
              > Regression, anyone?
              >
              > John
              >
              >
              >
              > > They were 64K upgrades, as we uses TRS-80 CoCo's in college
              because
              > > RS was the only one incorporating Extended Basic needed for our
              > > programming courses. The Model 4's were already on their way out
              at
              > > the time....
              > > We were still ahead of the business guy's with their punch
              cards....
              > > Chicklet keyboards were awful....but a solid machine....6809e
              > > processor, 1mHz oc'd to 2mHz....poke something....
              > > Dave
              > > (still have the original 16K chips somewhere)
              > >
              > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, Ron Schwarz <rs@c...> wrote:
              > > > At 01:29 PM 12/1/2003 -0000, Dave said:
              > > > >Don't forget the 64K upgrades for $400 for the TRS-80's.....
              > > >
              > > > You're thinking of the *16* KB upgrades. I got my second two
              16K
              > > upgrades
              > > > from a second-source for the mere sum of $79 *each* (for a
              total
              > > of 32
              > > > KILObytes), maxing out my system at 48KB (the rest of the Z80's
              > > address
              > > > space was reserved for memory-mapped I/O).
              > > >
              > > > The $79 price was *so* low that I was very worried that it was
              a
              > > scam,
              > > > until the chips arrived, and *worked*. (I even worried that
              they
              > > were scrap
              > > > chips, until I'd actually plugged them into my Expansion
              Interface
              > > and
              > > > fired up the beast. The price was *that* low...)
              > > >
              > > > Then there's the $695 I spent for my first floppy drive, a
              SSSD 35
              > > track,
              > > > 89 KB Shugart with a mid-cable-wart power supply. (Or was it a
              > > mega-size
              > > > wall-wart? Oh, the decades...)
              > > >
              > > > My next drive was a 40 track MPI that sounded like a machinegun
              > > when the
              > > > head stepper motor engaged, because the FDC was hardwired (at
              > > least "hard
              > > > firm-wired") to send out stepping signals at the rate the
              ultra-
              > > slow
              > > > Shugart's plastic flat-worm-wheel could tolerate. When I
              finally
              > > managed
              > > > to get a patch to let me tweak the step rate, the MPI was
              nearly
              > > silent
              > > > when it positioned the head, just a quiet whoosh-whoosh, like
              > > smooth metal
              > > > sliding on smooth metal. (The MPI used a metal band that wound
              > > around a
              > > > wheel on the stepper motor, which directly drove the head
              > > carriage.)
              > > >
              > > > I eventually ended up with four half-height Mitsubishis, 80
              track
              > > double
              > > > density, 720 KB each (the later 720KB 3.5" drives were virtual
              > > equivalents
              > > > except for media size), and I was in hog heaven.
              > > >
              > > > Then, I added the Mumford Micro Systems turbo kit, and blew out
              > > its brains.
              > > > Ow. We needed that beast to run the estimates and billing
              for our
              > > > wholesale camera repair shop! It had survived the lowercase
              > > upgrade I
              > > > kludged in using Dennis Bathory Kitsz's samizdat newsletter,
              and
              > > the
              > > > double-density FDC daughterboard I squeezed in, so I figured
              why
              > > not speed
              > > > it up a bit? I guess expecting a 2.5 megahertz clock rate out
              of
              > > it was
              > > > more than it could stand.
              > > >
              > > > We ended up racing down to the local ratshack and buying a
              Model
              > > 4, which
              > > > they'd had on (modest) sale. It was *incredibly* reliable
              > > compared to the
              > > > Model 1, which had gone in for warranty service SIXTEEN times
              > > (including
              > > > five mainboard changes during the times they had to send it all
              > > the way to
              > > > Texas) -- and it *still* needed the occaisional whack on the
              side
              > > > (literally, and several times a day) to "unstick" it when it
              > > locked up.
              > > > Sometimes, I'd have to reach back for the reset button, and
              > > sometimes I'd
              > > > have to power-down.
              > > >
              > > > They did NOT engineer a whole lot of reliability into that
              design.
              > > >
              > > > The only problem with the Model 4 was the power supply burning
              out
              > > (after
              > > > warranty expiration, natch). I found a surplus linear supply
              that
              > > fit in
              > > > the box (I drilled holes in the cabinet floor to mount it) and
              it
              > > worked
              > > > happily ever after, even after I replaced the stock drives
              with my
              > > four
              > > > half-height Mitsubishis. I've still got it somewhere, in fact.
              > > >
              > > > Ah, memories...
              > > >
              > > > (Maybe it's just this damn flu dredging 'em up though. Ugh.)
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --
              > > > Rare Stuff: http://www.clubvb.com
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Community email addresses:
              > > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
              > > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
              > > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
              > > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
              > >
              > > Shortcut URL to this page:
              > > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > >
              > >
            • John Boyle
              That s the one, Dave. It used roll paper about 4 wide. The CoCo could do one helluva nice graph with it tho. I had a 4-P way back then too. P, of course was
              Message 6 of 20 , Dec 2, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                That's the one, Dave.

                It used roll paper about 4" wide.
                The CoCo could do one helluva nice graph with it tho.
                I had a 4-P way back then too. P, of course was "portable".
                Huh. Luggable, maybe, by todays standards. :-)
                My jaw dropped when I saw their first hard drive.
                "2 whole megabytes!" and a footprint bigger than the Mod 4.
                I'd love to have that little plotter today with all the interest
                in graphing Geigers. Old tech but fun to watch!

                John



                > John, if memory serves me right, it was the TRS-80 CCP-115 Pen
                > Plotter produced for a short time and way too expensive for me to
                > purchase at the time. I think the ad showed and etch-a-sketch type
                > graphic being plotted on it. Pretty rare now, esp. the pens......
                > Dave
                >
                > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "John Boyle" <kb3cny@a...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Dave,
                > > I gotta jump in on this one.
                > > Did you ever see the tiny printer/plotter with ballpoint pens
                > RatSack
                > > sold for the CoCo?
                > >
                > > BTW, the noble Zilog Z-80 and Z-80A are still readilly available!
                > > Regression, anyone?
                > >
                > > John
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > > They were 64K upgrades, as we uses TRS-80 CoCo's in college
                > because
                > > > RS was the only one incorporating Extended Basic needed for our
                > > > programming courses. The Model 4's were already on their way out
                > at
                > > > the time....
                > > > We were still ahead of the business guy's with their punch
                > cards....
                > > > Chicklet keyboards were awful....but a solid machine....6809e
                > > > processor, 1mHz oc'd to 2mHz....poke something....
                > > > Dave
                > > > (still have the original 16K chips somewhere)
                > > >
                > > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, Ron Schwarz <rs@c...> wrote:
                > > > > At 01:29 PM 12/1/2003 -0000, Dave said:
                > > > > >Don't forget the 64K upgrades for $400 for the TRS-80's.....
                > > > >
                > > > > You're thinking of the *16* KB upgrades. I got my second two
                > 16K
                > > > upgrades
                > > > > from a second-source for the mere sum of $79 *each* (for a
                > total
                > > > of 32
                > > > > KILObytes), maxing out my system at 48KB (the rest of the Z80's
                > > > address
                > > > > space was reserved for memory-mapped I/O).
                > > > >
                > > > > The $79 price was *so* low that I was very worried that it was
                > a
                > > > scam,
                > > > > until the chips arrived, and *worked*. (I even worried that
                > they
                > > > were scrap
                > > > > chips, until I'd actually plugged them into my Expansion
                > Interface
                > > > and
                > > > > fired up the beast. The price was *that* low...)
                > > > >
                > > > > Then there's the $695 I spent for my first floppy drive, a
                > SSSD 35
                > > > track,
                > > > > 89 KB Shugart with a mid-cable-wart power supply. (Or was it a
                > > > mega-size
                > > > > wall-wart? Oh, the decades...)
                > > > >
                > > > > My next drive was a 40 track MPI that sounded like a machinegun
                > > > when the
                > > > > head stepper motor engaged, because the FDC was hardwired (at
                > > > least "hard
                > > > > firm-wired") to send out stepping signals at the rate the
                > ultra-
                > > > slow
                > > > > Shugart's plastic flat-worm-wheel could tolerate. When I
                > finally
                > > > managed
                > > > > to get a patch to let me tweak the step rate, the MPI was
                > nearly
                > > > silent
                > > > > when it positioned the head, just a quiet whoosh-whoosh, like
                > > > smooth metal
                > > > > sliding on smooth metal. (The MPI used a metal band that wound
                > > > around a
                > > > > wheel on the stepper motor, which directly drove the head
                > > > carriage.)
                > > > >
                > > > > I eventually ended up with four half-height Mitsubishis, 80
                > track
                > > > double
                > > > > density, 720 KB each (the later 720KB 3.5" drives were virtual
                > > > equivalents
                > > > > except for media size), and I was in hog heaven.
                > > > >
                > > > > Then, I added the Mumford Micro Systems turbo kit, and blew out
                > > > its brains.
                > > > > Ow. We needed that beast to run the estimates and billing
                > for our
                > > > > wholesale camera repair shop! It had survived the lowercase
                > > > upgrade I
                > > > > kludged in using Dennis Bathory Kitsz's samizdat newsletter,
                > and
                > > > the
                > > > > double-density FDC daughterboard I squeezed in, so I figured
                > why
                > > > not speed
                > > > > it up a bit? I guess expecting a 2.5 megahertz clock rate out
                > of
                > > > it was
                > > > > more than it could stand.
                > > > >
                > > > > We ended up racing down to the local ratshack and buying a
                > Model
                > > > 4, which
                > > > > they'd had on (modest) sale. It was *incredibly* reliable
                > > > compared to the
                > > > > Model 1, which had gone in for warranty service SIXTEEN times
                > > > (including
                > > > > five mainboard changes during the times they had to send it all
                > > > the way to
                > > > > Texas) -- and it *still* needed the occaisional whack on the
                > side
                > > > > (literally, and several times a day) to "unstick" it when it
                > > > locked up.
                > > > > Sometimes, I'd have to reach back for the reset button, and
                > > > sometimes I'd
                > > > > have to power-down.
                > > > >
                > > > > They did NOT engineer a whole lot of reliability into that
                > design.
                > > > >
                > > > > The only problem with the Model 4 was the power supply burning
                > out
                > > > (after
                > > > > warranty expiration, natch). I found a surplus linear supply
                > that
                > > > fit in
                > > > > the box (I drilled holes in the cabinet floor to mount it) and
                > it
                > > > worked
                > > > > happily ever after, even after I replaced the stock drives
                > with my
                > > > four
                > > > > half-height Mitsubishis. I've still got it somewhere, in fact.
                > > > >
                > > > > Ah, memories...
                > > > >
                > > > > (Maybe it's just this damn flu dredging 'em up though. Ugh.)
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > --
                > > > > Rare Stuff: http://www.clubvb.com
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Community email addresses:
                > > > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
                > > > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
                > > > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                > > > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
                > > >
                > > > Shortcut URL to this page:
                > > > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
                > > >
                > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                > > >
                > > >
                >
                >
                >
                > Community email addresses:
                > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
                > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
                > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
                >
                > Shortcut URL to this page:
                > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
                >
              • Dave
                John, upon some research, Atari also had this pen based printer made for them by the same manufacturer. The model number is the 1020 Printer/Plotter. There is
                Message 7 of 20 , Dec 7, 2003
                • 0 Attachment
                  John, upon some research, Atari also had this pen based printer made
                  for them by the same manufacturer.
                  The model number is the 1020 Printer/Plotter.
                  There is one currently up for auction now in the UK.
                  I'll be watching for any US/CDN auctions myself.
                  I collect vintage computers also, and Atari is one of my
                  favorites....
                  Am interesting fact about Atari is that the SIO interface used by
                  the Atari printers and drives was the precursor to the USB hub
                  standard and developed by the same engineer. (some trivia)
                  Dave

                  --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "John Boyle" <kb3cny@a...> wrote:
                  >
                  > That's the one, Dave.
                  >
                  > It used roll paper about 4" wide.
                  > The CoCo could do one helluva nice graph with it tho.
                  > I had a 4-P way back then too. P, of course was "portable".
                  > Huh. Luggable, maybe, by todays standards. :-)
                  > My jaw dropped when I saw their first hard drive.
                  > "2 whole megabytes!" and a footprint bigger than the Mod 4.
                  > I'd love to have that little plotter today with all the interest
                  > in graphing Geigers. Old tech but fun to watch!
                  >
                  > John
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > > John, if memory serves me right, it was the TRS-80 CCP-115 Pen
                  > > Plotter produced for a short time and way too expensive for me to
                  > > purchase at the time. I think the ad showed and etch-a-sketch
                  type
                  > > graphic being plotted on it. Pretty rare now, esp. the pens......
                  > > Dave
                  > >
                  > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "John Boyle" <kb3cny@a...>
                  wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Dave,
                  > > > I gotta jump in on this one.
                  > > > Did you ever see the tiny printer/plotter with ballpoint pens
                  > > RatSack
                  > > > sold for the CoCo?
                  > > >
                  > > > BTW, the noble Zilog Z-80 and Z-80A are still readilly
                  available!
                  > > > Regression, anyone?
                  > > >
                  > > > John
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > > They were 64K upgrades, as we uses TRS-80 CoCo's in college
                  > > because
                  > > > > RS was the only one incorporating Extended Basic needed for
                  our
                  > > > > programming courses. The Model 4's were already on their way
                  out
                  > > at
                  > > > > the time....
                  > > > > We were still ahead of the business guy's with their punch
                  > > cards....
                  > > > > Chicklet keyboards were awful....but a solid machine....6809e
                  > > > > processor, 1mHz oc'd to 2mHz....poke something....
                  > > > > Dave
                  > > > > (still have the original 16K chips somewhere)
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, Ron Schwarz <rs@c...>
                  wrote:
                  > > > > > At 01:29 PM 12/1/2003 -0000, Dave said:
                  > > > > > >Don't forget the 64K upgrades for $400 for the TRS-
                  80's.....
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > You're thinking of the *16* KB upgrades. I got my second
                  two
                  > > 16K
                  > > > > upgrades
                  > > > > > from a second-source for the mere sum of $79 *each* (for a
                  > > total
                  > > > > of 32
                  > > > > > KILObytes), maxing out my system at 48KB (the rest of the
                  Z80's
                  > > > > address
                  > > > > > space was reserved for memory-mapped I/O).
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > The $79 price was *so* low that I was very worried that it
                  was
                  > > a
                  > > > > scam,
                  > > > > > until the chips arrived, and *worked*. (I even worried that
                  > > they
                  > > > > were scrap
                  > > > > > chips, until I'd actually plugged them into my Expansion
                  > > Interface
                  > > > > and
                  > > > > > fired up the beast. The price was *that* low...)
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Then there's the $695 I spent for my first floppy drive, a
                  > > SSSD 35
                  > > > > track,
                  > > > > > 89 KB Shugart with a mid-cable-wart power supply. (Or was
                  it a
                  > > > > mega-size
                  > > > > > wall-wart? Oh, the decades...)
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > My next drive was a 40 track MPI that sounded like a
                  machinegun
                  > > > > when the
                  > > > > > head stepper motor engaged, because the FDC was hardwired
                  (at
                  > > > > least "hard
                  > > > > > firm-wired") to send out stepping signals at the rate the
                  > > ultra-
                  > > > > slow
                  > > > > > Shugart's plastic flat-worm-wheel could tolerate. When I
                  > > finally
                  > > > > managed
                  > > > > > to get a patch to let me tweak the step rate, the MPI was
                  > > nearly
                  > > > > silent
                  > > > > > when it positioned the head, just a quiet whoosh-whoosh,
                  like
                  > > > > smooth metal
                  > > > > > sliding on smooth metal. (The MPI used a metal band that
                  wound
                  > > > > around a
                  > > > > > wheel on the stepper motor, which directly drove the head
                  > > > > carriage.)
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > I eventually ended up with four half-height Mitsubishis, 80
                  > > track
                  > > > > double
                  > > > > > density, 720 KB each (the later 720KB 3.5" drives were
                  virtual
                  > > > > equivalents
                  > > > > > except for media size), and I was in hog heaven.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Then, I added the Mumford Micro Systems turbo kit, and
                  blew out
                  > > > > its brains.
                  > > > > > Ow. We needed that beast to run the estimates and billing
                  > > for our
                  > > > > > wholesale camera repair shop! It had survived the
                  lowercase
                  > > > > upgrade I
                  > > > > > kludged in using Dennis Bathory Kitsz's samizdat
                  newsletter,
                  > > and
                  > > > > the
                  > > > > > double-density FDC daughterboard I squeezed in, so I
                  figured
                  > > why
                  > > > > not speed
                  > > > > > it up a bit? I guess expecting a 2.5 megahertz clock rate
                  out
                  > > of
                  > > > > it was
                  > > > > > more than it could stand.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > We ended up racing down to the local ratshack and buying a
                  > > Model
                  > > > > 4, which
                  > > > > > they'd had on (modest) sale. It was *incredibly* reliable
                  > > > > compared to the
                  > > > > > Model 1, which had gone in for warranty service SIXTEEN
                  times
                  > > > > (including
                  > > > > > five mainboard changes during the times they had to send
                  it all
                  > > > > the way to
                  > > > > > Texas) -- and it *still* needed the occaisional whack on
                  the
                  > > side
                  > > > > > (literally, and several times a day) to "unstick" it when
                  it
                  > > > > locked up.
                  > > > > > Sometimes, I'd have to reach back for the reset button, and
                  > > > > sometimes I'd
                  > > > > > have to power-down.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > They did NOT engineer a whole lot of reliability into that
                  > > design.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > The only problem with the Model 4 was the power supply
                  burning
                  > > out
                  > > > > (after
                  > > > > > warranty expiration, natch). I found a surplus linear
                  supply
                  > > that
                  > > > > fit in
                  > > > > > the box (I drilled holes in the cabinet floor to mount it)
                  and
                  > > it
                  > > > > worked
                  > > > > > happily ever after, even after I replaced the stock drives
                  > > with my
                  > > > > four
                  > > > > > half-height Mitsubishis. I've still got it somewhere, in
                  fact.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Ah, memories...
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > (Maybe it's just this damn flu dredging 'em up though.
                  Ugh.)
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > --
                  > > > > > Rare Stuff: http://www.clubvb.com
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Community email addresses:
                  > > > > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
                  > > > > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
                  > > > > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                  > > > > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Shortcut URL to this page:
                  > > > > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Community email addresses:
                  > > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
                  > > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
                  > > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                  > > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
                  > >
                  > > Shortcut URL to this page:
                  > > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
                  > >
                  > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                • Dave
                  Oops, forgot the auction URL.... http://cgi.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dll? ViewItem&item=3063585774&category=1250 ... made ... to ... pens...... ... for ... way ...
                  Message 8 of 20 , Dec 7, 2003
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Oops, forgot the auction URL....

                    http://cgi.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
                    ViewItem&item=3063585774&category=1250

                    --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "Dave" <angelshamshel@h...> wrote:
                    > John, upon some research, Atari also had this pen based printer
                    made
                    > for them by the same manufacturer.
                    > The model number is the 1020 Printer/Plotter.
                    > There is one currently up for auction now in the UK.
                    > I'll be watching for any US/CDN auctions myself.
                    > I collect vintage computers also, and Atari is one of my
                    > favorites....
                    > Am interesting fact about Atari is that the SIO interface used by
                    > the Atari printers and drives was the precursor to the USB hub
                    > standard and developed by the same engineer. (some trivia)
                    > Dave
                    >
                    > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "John Boyle" <kb3cny@a...>
                    wrote:
                    > >
                    > > That's the one, Dave.
                    > >
                    > > It used roll paper about 4" wide.
                    > > The CoCo could do one helluva nice graph with it tho.
                    > > I had a 4-P way back then too. P, of course was "portable".
                    > > Huh. Luggable, maybe, by todays standards. :-)
                    > > My jaw dropped when I saw their first hard drive.
                    > > "2 whole megabytes!" and a footprint bigger than the Mod 4.
                    > > I'd love to have that little plotter today with all the interest
                    > > in graphing Geigers. Old tech but fun to watch!
                    > >
                    > > John
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > > John, if memory serves me right, it was the TRS-80 CCP-115 Pen
                    > > > Plotter produced for a short time and way too expensive for me
                    to
                    > > > purchase at the time. I think the ad showed and etch-a-sketch
                    > type
                    > > > graphic being plotted on it. Pretty rare now, esp. the
                    pens......
                    > > > Dave
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "John Boyle" <kb3cny@a...>
                    > wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Dave,
                    > > > > I gotta jump in on this one.
                    > > > > Did you ever see the tiny printer/plotter with ballpoint pens
                    > > > RatSack
                    > > > > sold for the CoCo?
                    > > > >
                    > > > > BTW, the noble Zilog Z-80 and Z-80A are still readilly
                    > available!
                    > > > > Regression, anyone?
                    > > > >
                    > > > > John
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > > > They were 64K upgrades, as we uses TRS-80 CoCo's in college
                    > > > because
                    > > > > > RS was the only one incorporating Extended Basic needed
                    for
                    > our
                    > > > > > programming courses. The Model 4's were already on their
                    way
                    > out
                    > > > at
                    > > > > > the time....
                    > > > > > We were still ahead of the business guy's with their punch
                    > > > cards....
                    > > > > > Chicklet keyboards were awful....but a solid
                    machine....6809e
                    > > > > > processor, 1mHz oc'd to 2mHz....poke something....
                    > > > > > Dave
                    > > > > > (still have the original 16K chips somewhere)
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, Ron Schwarz <rs@c...>
                    > wrote:
                    > > > > > > At 01:29 PM 12/1/2003 -0000, Dave said:
                    > > > > > > >Don't forget the 64K upgrades for $400 for the TRS-
                    > 80's.....
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > You're thinking of the *16* KB upgrades. I got my
                    second
                    > two
                    > > > 16K
                    > > > > > upgrades
                    > > > > > > from a second-source for the mere sum of $79 *each* (for
                    a
                    > > > total
                    > > > > > of 32
                    > > > > > > KILObytes), maxing out my system at 48KB (the rest of
                    the
                    > Z80's
                    > > > > > address
                    > > > > > > space was reserved for memory-mapped I/O).
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > The $79 price was *so* low that I was very worried that
                    it
                    > was
                    > > > a
                    > > > > > scam,
                    > > > > > > until the chips arrived, and *worked*. (I even worried
                    that
                    > > > they
                    > > > > > were scrap
                    > > > > > > chips, until I'd actually plugged them into my Expansion
                    > > > Interface
                    > > > > > and
                    > > > > > > fired up the beast. The price was *that* low...)
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Then there's the $695 I spent for my first floppy drive,
                    a
                    > > > SSSD 35
                    > > > > > track,
                    > > > > > > 89 KB Shugart with a mid-cable-wart power supply. (Or
                    was
                    > it a
                    > > > > > mega-size
                    > > > > > > wall-wart? Oh, the decades...)
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > My next drive was a 40 track MPI that sounded like a
                    > machinegun
                    > > > > > when the
                    > > > > > > head stepper motor engaged, because the FDC was
                    hardwired
                    > (at
                    > > > > > least "hard
                    > > > > > > firm-wired") to send out stepping signals at the rate the
                    > > > ultra-
                    > > > > > slow
                    > > > > > > Shugart's plastic flat-worm-wheel could tolerate. When I
                    > > > finally
                    > > > > > managed
                    > > > > > > to get a patch to let me tweak the step rate, the MPI was
                    > > > nearly
                    > > > > > silent
                    > > > > > > when it positioned the head, just a quiet whoosh-whoosh,
                    > like
                    > > > > > smooth metal
                    > > > > > > sliding on smooth metal. (The MPI used a metal band
                    that
                    > wound
                    > > > > > around a
                    > > > > > > wheel on the stepper motor, which directly drove the head
                    > > > > > carriage.)
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > I eventually ended up with four half-height Mitsubishis,
                    80
                    > > > track
                    > > > > > double
                    > > > > > > density, 720 KB each (the later 720KB 3.5" drives were
                    > virtual
                    > > > > > equivalents
                    > > > > > > except for media size), and I was in hog heaven.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Then, I added the Mumford Micro Systems turbo kit, and
                    > blew out
                    > > > > > its brains.
                    > > > > > > Ow. We needed that beast to run the estimates and
                    billing
                    > > > for our
                    > > > > > > wholesale camera repair shop! It had survived the
                    > lowercase
                    > > > > > upgrade I
                    > > > > > > kludged in using Dennis Bathory Kitsz's samizdat
                    > newsletter,
                    > > > and
                    > > > > > the
                    > > > > > > double-density FDC daughterboard I squeezed in, so I
                    > figured
                    > > > why
                    > > > > > not speed
                    > > > > > > it up a bit? I guess expecting a 2.5 megahertz clock
                    rate
                    > out
                    > > > of
                    > > > > > it was
                    > > > > > > more than it could stand.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > We ended up racing down to the local ratshack and buying
                    a
                    > > > Model
                    > > > > > 4, which
                    > > > > > > they'd had on (modest) sale. It was *incredibly*
                    reliable
                    > > > > > compared to the
                    > > > > > > Model 1, which had gone in for warranty service SIXTEEN
                    > times
                    > > > > > (including
                    > > > > > > five mainboard changes during the times they had to send
                    > it all
                    > > > > > the way to
                    > > > > > > Texas) -- and it *still* needed the occaisional whack on
                    > the
                    > > > side
                    > > > > > > (literally, and several times a day) to "unstick" it
                    when
                    > it
                    > > > > > locked up.
                    > > > > > > Sometimes, I'd have to reach back for the reset button,
                    and
                    > > > > > sometimes I'd
                    > > > > > > have to power-down.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > They did NOT engineer a whole lot of reliability into
                    that
                    > > > design.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > The only problem with the Model 4 was the power supply
                    > burning
                    > > > out
                    > > > > > (after
                    > > > > > > warranty expiration, natch). I found a surplus linear
                    > supply
                    > > > that
                    > > > > > fit in
                    > > > > > > the box (I drilled holes in the cabinet floor to mount
                    it)
                    > and
                    > > > it
                    > > > > > worked
                    > > > > > > happily ever after, even after I replaced the stock
                    drives
                    > > > with my
                    > > > > > four
                    > > > > > > half-height Mitsubishis. I've still got it somewhere,
                    in
                    > fact.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Ah, memories...
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > (Maybe it's just this damn flu dredging 'em up though.
                    > Ugh.)
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > --
                    > > > > > > Rare Stuff: http://www.clubvb.com
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Community email addresses:
                    > > > > > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
                    > > > > > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
                    > > > > > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                    > > > > > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Shortcut URL to this page:
                    > > > > > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                    > > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > Community email addresses:
                    > > > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
                    > > > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
                    > > > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                    > > > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
                    > > >
                    > > > Shortcut URL to this page:
                    > > > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
                    > > >
                    > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                    > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                  • Dave
                    Serial Input Output (SIO) specification link... http://www.atariarchives.org/cfn/05/07/0014.php ... made ... to ... pens...... ... for ... way ...
                    Message 9 of 20 , Dec 7, 2003
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Serial Input Output (SIO) specification link...

                      http://www.atariarchives.org/cfn/05/07/0014.php


                      --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "Dave" <angelshamshel@h...> wrote:
                      > John, upon some research, Atari also had this pen based printer
                      made
                      > for them by the same manufacturer.
                      > The model number is the 1020 Printer/Plotter.
                      > There is one currently up for auction now in the UK.
                      > I'll be watching for any US/CDN auctions myself.
                      > I collect vintage computers also, and Atari is one of my
                      > favorites....
                      > Am interesting fact about Atari is that the SIO interface used by
                      > the Atari printers and drives was the precursor to the USB hub
                      > standard and developed by the same engineer. (some trivia)
                      > Dave
                      >
                      > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "John Boyle" <kb3cny@a...>
                      wrote:
                      > >
                      > > That's the one, Dave.
                      > >
                      > > It used roll paper about 4" wide.
                      > > The CoCo could do one helluva nice graph with it tho.
                      > > I had a 4-P way back then too. P, of course was "portable".
                      > > Huh. Luggable, maybe, by todays standards. :-)
                      > > My jaw dropped when I saw their first hard drive.
                      > > "2 whole megabytes!" and a footprint bigger than the Mod 4.
                      > > I'd love to have that little plotter today with all the interest
                      > > in graphing Geigers. Old tech but fun to watch!
                      > >
                      > > John
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > > John, if memory serves me right, it was the TRS-80 CCP-115 Pen
                      > > > Plotter produced for a short time and way too expensive for me
                      to
                      > > > purchase at the time. I think the ad showed and etch-a-sketch
                      > type
                      > > > graphic being plotted on it. Pretty rare now, esp. the
                      pens......
                      > > > Dave
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "John Boyle" <kb3cny@a...>
                      > wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Dave,
                      > > > > I gotta jump in on this one.
                      > > > > Did you ever see the tiny printer/plotter with ballpoint pens
                      > > > RatSack
                      > > > > sold for the CoCo?
                      > > > >
                      > > > > BTW, the noble Zilog Z-80 and Z-80A are still readilly
                      > available!
                      > > > > Regression, anyone?
                      > > > >
                      > > > > John
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > > They were 64K upgrades, as we uses TRS-80 CoCo's in college
                      > > > because
                      > > > > > RS was the only one incorporating Extended Basic needed
                      for
                      > our
                      > > > > > programming courses. The Model 4's were already on their
                      way
                      > out
                      > > > at
                      > > > > > the time....
                      > > > > > We were still ahead of the business guy's with their punch
                      > > > cards....
                      > > > > > Chicklet keyboards were awful....but a solid
                      machine....6809e
                      > > > > > processor, 1mHz oc'd to 2mHz....poke something....
                      > > > > > Dave
                      > > > > > (still have the original 16K chips somewhere)
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, Ron Schwarz <rs@c...>
                      > wrote:
                      > > > > > > At 01:29 PM 12/1/2003 -0000, Dave said:
                      > > > > > > >Don't forget the 64K upgrades for $400 for the TRS-
                      > 80's.....
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > You're thinking of the *16* KB upgrades. I got my
                      second
                      > two
                      > > > 16K
                      > > > > > upgrades
                      > > > > > > from a second-source for the mere sum of $79 *each* (for
                      a
                      > > > total
                      > > > > > of 32
                      > > > > > > KILObytes), maxing out my system at 48KB (the rest of
                      the
                      > Z80's
                      > > > > > address
                      > > > > > > space was reserved for memory-mapped I/O).
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > The $79 price was *so* low that I was very worried that
                      it
                      > was
                      > > > a
                      > > > > > scam,
                      > > > > > > until the chips arrived, and *worked*. (I even worried
                      that
                      > > > they
                      > > > > > were scrap
                      > > > > > > chips, until I'd actually plugged them into my Expansion
                      > > > Interface
                      > > > > > and
                      > > > > > > fired up the beast. The price was *that* low...)
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > Then there's the $695 I spent for my first floppy drive,
                      a
                      > > > SSSD 35
                      > > > > > track,
                      > > > > > > 89 KB Shugart with a mid-cable-wart power supply. (Or
                      was
                      > it a
                      > > > > > mega-size
                      > > > > > > wall-wart? Oh, the decades...)
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > My next drive was a 40 track MPI that sounded like a
                      > machinegun
                      > > > > > when the
                      > > > > > > head stepper motor engaged, because the FDC was
                      hardwired
                      > (at
                      > > > > > least "hard
                      > > > > > > firm-wired") to send out stepping signals at the rate the
                      > > > ultra-
                      > > > > > slow
                      > > > > > > Shugart's plastic flat-worm-wheel could tolerate. When I
                      > > > finally
                      > > > > > managed
                      > > > > > > to get a patch to let me tweak the step rate, the MPI was
                      > > > nearly
                      > > > > > silent
                      > > > > > > when it positioned the head, just a quiet whoosh-whoosh,
                      > like
                      > > > > > smooth metal
                      > > > > > > sliding on smooth metal. (The MPI used a metal band
                      that
                      > wound
                      > > > > > around a
                      > > > > > > wheel on the stepper motor, which directly drove the head
                      > > > > > carriage.)
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > I eventually ended up with four half-height Mitsubishis,
                      80
                      > > > track
                      > > > > > double
                      > > > > > > density, 720 KB each (the later 720KB 3.5" drives were
                      > virtual
                      > > > > > equivalents
                      > > > > > > except for media size), and I was in hog heaven.
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > Then, I added the Mumford Micro Systems turbo kit, and
                      > blew out
                      > > > > > its brains.
                      > > > > > > Ow. We needed that beast to run the estimates and
                      billing
                      > > > for our
                      > > > > > > wholesale camera repair shop! It had survived the
                      > lowercase
                      > > > > > upgrade I
                      > > > > > > kludged in using Dennis Bathory Kitsz's samizdat
                      > newsletter,
                      > > > and
                      > > > > > the
                      > > > > > > double-density FDC daughterboard I squeezed in, so I
                      > figured
                      > > > why
                      > > > > > not speed
                      > > > > > > it up a bit? I guess expecting a 2.5 megahertz clock
                      rate
                      > out
                      > > > of
                      > > > > > it was
                      > > > > > > more than it could stand.
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > We ended up racing down to the local ratshack and buying
                      a
                      > > > Model
                      > > > > > 4, which
                      > > > > > > they'd had on (modest) sale. It was *incredibly*
                      reliable
                      > > > > > compared to the
                      > > > > > > Model 1, which had gone in for warranty service SIXTEEN
                      > times
                      > > > > > (including
                      > > > > > > five mainboard changes during the times they had to send
                      > it all
                      > > > > > the way to
                      > > > > > > Texas) -- and it *still* needed the occaisional whack on
                      > the
                      > > > side
                      > > > > > > (literally, and several times a day) to "unstick" it
                      when
                      > it
                      > > > > > locked up.
                      > > > > > > Sometimes, I'd have to reach back for the reset button,
                      and
                      > > > > > sometimes I'd
                      > > > > > > have to power-down.
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > They did NOT engineer a whole lot of reliability into
                      that
                      > > > design.
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > The only problem with the Model 4 was the power supply
                      > burning
                      > > > out
                      > > > > > (after
                      > > > > > > warranty expiration, natch). I found a surplus linear
                      > supply
                      > > > that
                      > > > > > fit in
                      > > > > > > the box (I drilled holes in the cabinet floor to mount
                      it)
                      > and
                      > > > it
                      > > > > > worked
                      > > > > > > happily ever after, even after I replaced the stock
                      drives
                      > > > with my
                      > > > > > four
                      > > > > > > half-height Mitsubishis. I've still got it somewhere,
                      in
                      > fact.
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > Ah, memories...
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > (Maybe it's just this damn flu dredging 'em up though.
                      > Ugh.)
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > >
                      > > > > > > --
                      > > > > > > Rare Stuff: http://www.clubvb.com
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Community email addresses:
                      > > > > > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
                      > > > > > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
                      > > > > > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                      > > > > > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Shortcut URL to this page:
                      > > > > > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                      > > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Community email addresses:
                      > > > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
                      > > > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
                      > > > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                      > > > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
                      > > >
                      > > > Shortcut URL to this page:
                      > > > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
                      > > >
                      > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                    • John Boyle
                      Dave, Yep. Picked up an Atari plotter at a yard sale a couple years ago. Please contact me off list. kb3cny@adelphia.net I ve got some way off topic info
                      Message 10 of 20 , Dec 7, 2003
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Dave,

                        Yep. Picked up an Atari plotter at a yard sale a couple
                        years ago.

                        Please contact me off list. kb3cny@...
                        I've got some way off topic info you may be interested in.
                        Thanks.

                        John

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "Dave" <angelshamshel@...>
                        To: <CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Sunday, December 07, 2003 9:52 AM
                        Subject: [CDV700CLUB] Re: 7616 Military Tube (off topic)


                        > John, upon some research, Atari also had this pen based printer made
                        > for them by the same manufacturer.
                        > The model number is the 1020 Printer/Plotter.
                        > There is one currently up for auction now in the UK.
                        > I'll be watching for any US/CDN auctions myself.
                        > I collect vintage computers also, and Atari is one of my
                        > favorites....
                        > Am interesting fact about Atari is that the SIO interface used by
                        > the Atari printers and drives was the precursor to the USB hub
                        > standard and developed by the same engineer. (some trivia)
                        > Dave
                        >
                        > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "John Boyle" <kb3cny@a...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > That's the one, Dave.
                        > >
                        > > It used roll paper about 4" wide.
                        > > The CoCo could do one helluva nice graph with it tho.
                        > > I had a 4-P way back then too. P, of course was "portable".
                        > > Huh. Luggable, maybe, by todays standards. :-)
                        > > My jaw dropped when I saw their first hard drive.
                        > > "2 whole megabytes!" and a footprint bigger than the Mod 4.
                        > > I'd love to have that little plotter today with all the interest
                        > > in graphing Geigers. Old tech but fun to watch!
                        > >
                        > > John
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > > John, if memory serves me right, it was the TRS-80 CCP-115 Pen
                        > > > Plotter produced for a short time and way too expensive for me to
                        > > > purchase at the time. I think the ad showed and etch-a-sketch
                        > type
                        > > > graphic being plotted on it. Pretty rare now, esp. the pens......
                        > > > Dave
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, "John Boyle" <kb3cny@a...>
                        > wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Dave,
                        > > > > I gotta jump in on this one.
                        > > > > Did you ever see the tiny printer/plotter with ballpoint pens
                        > > > RatSack
                        > > > > sold for the CoCo?
                        > > > >
                        > > > > BTW, the noble Zilog Z-80 and Z-80A are still readilly
                        > available!
                        > > > > Regression, anyone?
                        > > > >
                        > > > > John
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > > > They were 64K upgrades, as we uses TRS-80 CoCo's in college
                        > > > because
                        > > > > > RS was the only one incorporating Extended Basic needed for
                        > our
                        > > > > > programming courses. The Model 4's were already on their way
                        > out
                        > > > at
                        > > > > > the time....
                        > > > > > We were still ahead of the business guy's with their punch
                        > > > cards....
                        > > > > > Chicklet keyboards were awful....but a solid machine....6809e
                        > > > > > processor, 1mHz oc'd to 2mHz....poke something....
                        > > > > > Dave
                        > > > > > (still have the original 16K chips somewhere)
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > --- In CDV700CLUB@yahoogroups.com, Ron Schwarz <rs@c...>
                        > wrote:
                        > > > > > > At 01:29 PM 12/1/2003 -0000, Dave said:
                        > > > > > > >Don't forget the 64K upgrades for $400 for the TRS-
                        > 80's.....
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > You're thinking of the *16* KB upgrades. I got my second
                        > two
                        > > > 16K
                        > > > > > upgrades
                        > > > > > > from a second-source for the mere sum of $79 *each* (for a
                        > > > total
                        > > > > > of 32
                        > > > > > > KILObytes), maxing out my system at 48KB (the rest of the
                        > Z80's
                        > > > > > address
                        > > > > > > space was reserved for memory-mapped I/O).
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > The $79 price was *so* low that I was very worried that it
                        > was
                        > > > a
                        > > > > > scam,
                        > > > > > > until the chips arrived, and *worked*. (I even worried that
                        > > > they
                        > > > > > were scrap
                        > > > > > > chips, until I'd actually plugged them into my Expansion
                        > > > Interface
                        > > > > > and
                        > > > > > > fired up the beast. The price was *that* low...)
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Then there's the $695 I spent for my first floppy drive, a
                        > > > SSSD 35
                        > > > > > track,
                        > > > > > > 89 KB Shugart with a mid-cable-wart power supply. (Or was
                        > it a
                        > > > > > mega-size
                        > > > > > > wall-wart? Oh, the decades...)
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > My next drive was a 40 track MPI that sounded like a
                        > machinegun
                        > > > > > when the
                        > > > > > > head stepper motor engaged, because the FDC was hardwired
                        > (at
                        > > > > > least "hard
                        > > > > > > firm-wired") to send out stepping signals at the rate the
                        > > > ultra-
                        > > > > > slow
                        > > > > > > Shugart's plastic flat-worm-wheel could tolerate. When I
                        > > > finally
                        > > > > > managed
                        > > > > > > to get a patch to let me tweak the step rate, the MPI was
                        > > > nearly
                        > > > > > silent
                        > > > > > > when it positioned the head, just a quiet whoosh-whoosh,
                        > like
                        > > > > > smooth metal
                        > > > > > > sliding on smooth metal. (The MPI used a metal band that
                        > wound
                        > > > > > around a
                        > > > > > > wheel on the stepper motor, which directly drove the head
                        > > > > > carriage.)
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > I eventually ended up with four half-height Mitsubishis, 80
                        > > > track
                        > > > > > double
                        > > > > > > density, 720 KB each (the later 720KB 3.5" drives were
                        > virtual
                        > > > > > equivalents
                        > > > > > > except for media size), and I was in hog heaven.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Then, I added the Mumford Micro Systems turbo kit, and
                        > blew out
                        > > > > > its brains.
                        > > > > > > Ow. We needed that beast to run the estimates and billing
                        > > > for our
                        > > > > > > wholesale camera repair shop! It had survived the
                        > lowercase
                        > > > > > upgrade I
                        > > > > > > kludged in using Dennis Bathory Kitsz's samizdat
                        > newsletter,
                        > > > and
                        > > > > > the
                        > > > > > > double-density FDC daughterboard I squeezed in, so I
                        > figured
                        > > > why
                        > > > > > not speed
                        > > > > > > it up a bit? I guess expecting a 2.5 megahertz clock rate
                        > out
                        > > > of
                        > > > > > it was
                        > > > > > > more than it could stand.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > We ended up racing down to the local ratshack and buying a
                        > > > Model
                        > > > > > 4, which
                        > > > > > > they'd had on (modest) sale. It was *incredibly* reliable
                        > > > > > compared to the
                        > > > > > > Model 1, which had gone in for warranty service SIXTEEN
                        > times
                        > > > > > (including
                        > > > > > > five mainboard changes during the times they had to send
                        > it all
                        > > > > > the way to
                        > > > > > > Texas) -- and it *still* needed the occaisional whack on
                        > the
                        > > > side
                        > > > > > > (literally, and several times a day) to "unstick" it when
                        > it
                        > > > > > locked up.
                        > > > > > > Sometimes, I'd have to reach back for the reset button, and
                        > > > > > sometimes I'd
                        > > > > > > have to power-down.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > They did NOT engineer a whole lot of reliability into that
                        > > > design.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > The only problem with the Model 4 was the power supply
                        > burning
                        > > > out
                        > > > > > (after
                        > > > > > > warranty expiration, natch). I found a surplus linear
                        > supply
                        > > > that
                        > > > > > fit in
                        > > > > > > the box (I drilled holes in the cabinet floor to mount it)
                        > and
                        > > > it
                        > > > > > worked
                        > > > > > > happily ever after, even after I replaced the stock drives
                        > > > with my
                        > > > > > four
                        > > > > > > half-height Mitsubishis. I've still got it somewhere, in
                        > fact.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Ah, memories...
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > (Maybe it's just this damn flu dredging 'em up though.
                        > Ugh.)
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > --
                        > > > > > > Rare Stuff: http://www.clubvb.com
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Community email addresses:
                        > > > > > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
                        > > > > > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
                        > > > > > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                        > > > > > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Shortcut URL to this page:
                        > > > > > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                        > > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > Community email addresses:
                        > > > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
                        > > > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
                        > > > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                        > > > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
                        > > >
                        > > > Shortcut URL to this page:
                        > > > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
                        > > >
                        > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                        > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Community email addresses:
                        > Post message: CDV700CLUB@onelist.com
                        > Subscribe: CDV700CLUB-subscribe@onelist.com
                        > Unsubscribe: CDV700CLUB-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                        > List owner: CDV700CLUB-owner@onelist.com
                        >
                        > Shortcut URL to this page:
                        > http://www.onelist.com/community/CDV700CLUB
                        >
                        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                        >
                        >
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