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H1N1

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  • sabre_in_virginia
    My wife, who works at the local hospital and I, working in risk mgmt, have found many people mis-informed or not fully aware of seriousness of this flu season.
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 14, 2009
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      My wife, who works at the local hospital and I, working in risk mgmt, have found many people mis-informed or not fully aware of seriousness of this flu season.

      Over the coming days, I'll post information from the research I've done or she has about the H1N1 influenza virus. I'd been planning to do a post on this, but put it off. As it has now hit close to home twice, I'm not going to waste time making it pretty, but get at least some information to you now.
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      Yesterday, the US Centers for Disease & Prevention (CDC) acknowledged underreporting (for understandable reasons) and tripled or in some cases quadrupled its numbers for the period before mid-October. See media briefing http://www.cdc.gov/media/transcripts/2009/t091112.htm

      Some Quick Points of Information:
      A person can have the flu from about 4-7 days on average before experiencing symptoms. And, yet during this period that person can transmit it to others. So, practicing preventive measures all the time is important.

      Q. How long can influenza virus remain viable on objects (such as books and doorknobs)?
      A. Studies have shown that influenza virus can survive on environmental surfaces and can infect a person for 2 to 8 hours after being deposited on the surface.

      Many people born before 1950, came in contact with a similar strain of H1N1 and developed immunity. One reason why most of the infections are among young people.

      Prevention
      * Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub. (Scientists think 80% of the contamination occurs by hand contact).
      * Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way.
      --Cover your sneezes with a tissue and throw away or into the inside of your elbow
      -- Large social gatherings, bring a pocket sized hand sanitizer. (BTW, soap and water is better).

      Official Source of Information
      For you official source of information on this topic, I recommend the CDC.
      General / Sections
      http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/general_info.htm
      Questions and Answers
      http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/qa.html

      Note: Some of the CDC's video's are from the spring time and some of the information within is out of date, i.e. they seem to discount the threat discussing the low number of infections. Well, things have greatly changed since then.

      * If you have diabetes or other underlying health conditions, you'll need to gain a better understanding of your unique needs.

      Greg
      IA, Security, Safety & Risk Mgmt
      Rodica
      Dr., RN, MA
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