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NENE & VEERY

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  • scre@aol.com
    Sorry for the late report but I just got in a little while ago. On Friday 5/3 Matt Brady and I had a NENE (Hawaiian Goose) in Jenner Sonoma County. The bird
    Message 1 of 1 , May 6, 2002
      Sorry for the late report but I just got in a little while ago. On Friday
      5/3 Matt Brady and I had a NENE (Hawaiian Goose) in Jenner Sonoma County.
      The bird was in the grassy field along highway 116 immediately east of
      Highway 1. It was associating with a small flock of one of the larger
      subspecies of Canada Geese. The bird was unbanded and very wary. It would
      often look up and go into an alarm posture as were the Canada Geese it was
      with. I would have said this was a wild goose except the species is
      restricted to the Hawaiian Islands and is not migratory. I am going to
      contact some local zoo's to see if they have them or if one is missing or
      they know of one missing. Does anyone know of their status in Captivity in
      California or surrounding states? Also I thought the world population (wild
      and captive birds) were all banded yet this bird was not. We relocated the
      bird on Sunday 5/5 in the evening and watched it till 5:20 when the bird took
      off with 4 Canada Geese and appeared to land in the Russian River. We could
      see no indication that this bird wasn't capable of a long flight or had ever
      been in captivity. I was able to get a couple minutes of video of the bird.
      In any case the bird is quite a sight and well worth seeing.

      Also on Sunday 5/5 we made a stop in the morning at Point Reyes. We decided
      to check the outer point despite unfavorable conditions for migrants and I'm
      glad we did. At the Point Reyes Lighthouse migrants were restricted to a
      Warbling Vireo, 2 Audubon's Warblers and one Catharus Thrush which
      disappeared before we were able to get a real look at it. As we were leaving
      we again saw the thrush and after following this bird throughout the cypress
      grove and into different bushes in the area we concluded that it was a Veery.
      The bird didn't like to stay still for any length of time as it was
      constantly moving and flying about. We were unable to relocate the bird
      after 8:00 AM. If you would like any details on this bird please contact me.
      Sorry but I am afraid that I am too tired to include them tonight and I
      wanted to get this e-mail out.

      David Vander Pluym
      UCSC


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