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Banded Black Skimmer Resting at Malibu Lagoon

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  • Robert van de Hoek
    Greetings Birders: March 12, 2011 Saturday There were four Black Skimmer at Malibu Lagoon this morning (10:30am) and one had a silver band on the right leg. 
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 12 10:58 PM
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      Greetings Birders:
      March 12, 2011 Saturday

      There were four Black Skimmer at Malibu Lagoon this morning (10:30am) and one
      had a silver band on the right leg.  All four were resting for at least an hour
      at the entrance of the slough channels, adjacent to a small island that has been
      nicknamed "Lori's Island" by several naturalists and birders.

      The band numbers were as follows:

      54 ... 55 ... 34.

      Above the two numbers of 55 were some letters:  R&W... and below those letters
      were WAS...

      I would be interested to know the age and sex of this skimmer and any other
      information about this individual's life history.

      I also noted a singing/calling Marsh Wren, Virginia Rail, and several Sora, as
      well as a singing Red-winged Blackbird.

      A Great Blue Heron gathering nesting twigs from the saltgrass meadow at the
      second bridge island, brought them up to the Cypress trees near the southwestern
      boundary of Malibu Lagoon, where also can be found roosting Double-crested
      Cormorant.

      A pair of Killdeer and a pair of Mallard appeared to be in courtship.

      And there was a Song Sparrow gathering nesting material (vegetation fragments)
      and flying across the slough channel to a saltbush.

      Spring is in the air at Malibu Lagoon, i.e. nesting season is underway.

      "Roy"
      Robert van de Hoek, Conservation Biologist & Restoration Ecologist
      Ballona Institute and Wetlands Defense Fund
      Los Angeles (Playa del Rey), CA





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    • Nancy Kenyon
      Birders, Every once in a while, a birder discovers a banded bird. Though there are many ongoing projects involving banded birds here in California, the best
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 12 11:30 PM
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        Birders,
        Every once in a while, a birder discovers a banded bird.
        Though there are many ongoing projects involving banded
        birds here in California, the best thing to do when finding
        a banded bird is to report it to the Bird Banding Laboratory
        at: <http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbl/> . The laboratory will
        send you back full information about the bird such as where
        and when it was banded. They will also notify the people
        who banded the bird and this feedback is very important to
        their research.

        Nancy Kenyon
        Irvine
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