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Los Angeles Audubon Society December 8, 2010 monthly meeting

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  • Nick & Mary Freeman
    Hi Birders You are cordially invited to attend the general meeting for Los Angeles Audubon Society, 7:30pm, Wednesday December 10, 2010 in Plummer Park, 7335
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 3, 2010
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      Hi Birders

      You are cordially invited to attend the general meeting for Los
      Angeles Audubon Society, 7:30pm, Wednesday December 10, 2010 in
      Plummer Park, 7335 Santa Monica Blvd., West Hollywood, CA 90046,
      room 3 in the West Hollywood Community Hall. Parking is available on
      the Santa Monica Blvd. entrance side to the south and the lot behind
      LAAS on Fountain Ave. to the north. There is abundant on-street
      parking after 7:00pm on the south side of Santa Monica Blvd., across
      the street from Plummer Park and the West Hollywood Community Center.

      December's monthly meeting: Richard Tanner: The California Spotted
      Owl In the Mountains of Southern California

      Richard will discuss the status of the California Spotted Owl in
      southern California as well as on-going projects and research.
      Richard and his staff have been studying the California Spotted Owl
      in the mountains of southern California since 1987. This work started
      with the long-term demography study on the San Bernardino National
      Forest and, since 2005, has included projects on the Angeles and
      Cleveland National Forests. This work has included the banding, radio-
      tracking of owls to assess habitat use in burn areas, and the
      monitoring of historical territories. In the San Bernardino
      Mountains, the Spotted Owl population began declining in the early
      1990s. Occupancy of historical territories has dropped from 86% in
      1990 to around 33% over the last five years. Populations in the
      mountain ranges of the Angeles and Cleveland National Forests also
      appear to have declined during this same period. Though much of this
      population decline is likely due to long-term drought and its
      associated bark beetle infestations, the greatest long-term threat
      may well be catastrophic forest fire. Richard G. Tanner, is the
      principal of Tanner Environmental Services.

      Upcoming talks:

      January: Paul Lehman: Great Birds and Birding Spots of California

      February: Guy Commeau: Birding California Part 2

      Don't forget to get involved, join a local CBC!

      See you Wednesday night!

      Mary Freeman
      Glendale, CA
      Los Angeles Audubon Society Program Chair and Fieldtrip Leader and co-
      compiler of the Lancaster CBC
      http://losangelesaudubon.org/



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