Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Big Sur and Monterey Peninsula Christmas Counts

Expand Messages
  • Lammergeiereyes@aol.com
    Greetings birders far and wide Please write and let me know if you would like to participate in either our Big Sur [December 19] or Monterey Peninsula
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 30, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings birders far and wide


      Please write and let me know if you would like to participate in either our Big Sur [December 19] or Monterey Peninsula [December 27] Audubon Christmas Counts.


      The Big Sur Count is a wonderfully under-birdered event with vast scenic territories and scarce coastal specialties including California Condor, Mountain Quail and many others. The circle begins in the north at Palo Colorado Canyon and ends in the south within Big Sur River valley. It terminates in the east deep in the starkly beautiful Santa Lucia Mountains.


      The Monterey Peninsula Count is one the oldest continuous counts in America [this year is the 111th count] and is a much beloved institution that usually draws a great crowd and turns up some fine vagrant rarities. This circle, while more urbanized, does comprise lovely landscapes and diverse locales. The Mty circle stretches from the coastal sage lands of the old Fort Ord in the north to Soberanes canyon at Garrapata in the south to the oak and grasslands of the Sierra de Salinas in the east. Past finds in recent years have run the gambit from Crested Caracara to Cape May Warbler to Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers to name a very few. Though the circle does not extend too far offshore, we do also organize a boat trip to look for rare alcids and seabirds within the circle, which is always popular with visiting birders.


      As usual territories are doled out on a first come, first served basis.


      Good birding and happy holidays,


      Blake T. Matheson
      President, Monterey Audubon Society

      "Men still live who, in their youth, remember Passenger Pigeons. Trees still live who, in their youth, were shaken by a living wind. But a decade hence only the oldest oaks will remember, and at long last only the hills will know." Leopold (1949).



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.