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Fwd: [pacificseabirds] Cook's petrels off California

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  • Steve Hampton
    Forwarding from Pacificseabirds listserv-- the benefits of rat and cat removal in NZ. Other species (Xantus s Murrelet, Cassin s Auklet, Sooty Shearwater, and
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 15, 2010
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      Forwarding from Pacificseabirds listserv-- the benefits of rat and cat
      removal in NZ. Other species (Xantus's Murrelet, Cassin's Auklet, Sooty
      Shearwater, and Mottled Petrel come to mind) are benefitting from
      similar projects both in CA and NZ.




      Steve Hampton
      ________________
      Resource Economist
      Office of Spill Prevention and Response
      California Dept of Fish and Game
      PO Box 944209
      Sacramento, CA 94244-2090
      -----------------------------------
      (916) 323-4724 phone
      (916) 324-8829 fax

      >>> <Verena_Gill@...> 9/14/2010 6:42 PM >>>
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      It has been another astounding year and another grand season for
      Cook's
      Petrels off California. A year ago there was also a remarkable
      occurrence
      of this species in California:
      www.refugenet.org/birding/sepSBC09.html#TOC02

      Cook's Petrel is not particularly well known off the coast of North
      America, and those few birds that appear (May to November) are almost
      always more than 100 miles offshore. This year, in late July
      astounding
      reports were received from Peter Pyle and Abe Borker who were
      surveying
      seabirds for NOAA at the Davidson Seamount, about 60 miles from
      Monterey
      harbor. They observed a total count of over 3,000 Cook's Petrels on one
      day
      and almost 1,400 the next.

      According to Debi Shearwater, who helped us collect these numbers,
      there
      were also additional sightings of Cook's Petrels: four on 31 July off
      Half
      Moon Bay and one on 6 August off Monterey. These birds then seemed to
      disappear offshore almost as quickly as they appeared.

      Cook’s Petrel breeds (October to April) on islands off New Zealand,
      and the
      birds apparently spend some of their non-breeding season off South
      America.
      The recent increase in reports off our own Pacific coast has been
      attributed to the successful removal by researchers of rats and cats
      from
      Little Barrier Island, New Zealand. Little Barrier Island is one of
      New
      Zealand's premier native wildlife sanctuaries and is the reported
      source of
      "our" Cook's Petrels. Indications are that we might continue to see
      increased numbers of them in future years as the population continues
      to
      rebound.

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Verena A. Gill
      Wildlife Biologist
      U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
      Marine Mammals Management
      1011 East Tudor Road, MS 341
      Anchorage, Alaska 99503

      work phone: 907-786-3584
      work cell: 907-947-6443
      fax: 907-786-3816
      e-mail: verena_gill@...
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