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Re: [CALBIRDS] Eurasian Collared-Doves and hunting

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  • Rick
    I was under the impression that invasive spp. birds were not protected and thus there was basically and open season on them--I realize CA different from ND
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 19, 2010
      I was under the impression that invasive spp. birds were not protected
      and thus there was basically and open season on them--I realize CA
      different from ND but,... :-)

      On 8/19/2010 11:55 AM, Alvaro Jaramillo wrote:
      >
      > Thanks Steve,
      >
      > I am amazed that Fish and Game say "they do not seem to be gaining an
      > advantage over native species." I would have been much more comfortable
      > with, "we do not know.." Subjectively speaking here in my neck of the
      > woods
      > Mourning Doves are less common now than when the Collared Dove arrived;
      > however Collared Doves are much more local in their distribution
      > preferring
      > towns and farm buildings, rather than open fields, and less disturbed
      > sites.
      > In these places there are as many Mourning Doves as there have ever
      > been. I
      > would not be surprised if at the small scale Collareds are really
      > hammering
      > Mournings, but at the global scale there is no real threat to Mourning
      > Doves. Subjectively speaking, but it would be great for someone to do a
      > study.
      >
      > Alvaro
      >
      > Alvaro Jaramillo
      >
      > chucao@... <mailto:chucao%40coastside.net>
      >
      > Half Moon Bay, California
      >
      > Field Guides - Birding Tours Worldwide
      >
      > www.fieldguides.com
      >
      > _____
      >
      > From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:CALBIRDS%40yahoogroups.com>
      > [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:CALBIRDS%40yahoogroups.com>]
      > On Behalf
      > Of Steve Hampton
      > Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 9:40 AM
      > To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com <mailto:CALBIRDS%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Subject: [CALBIRDS] Eurasian Collared-Doves and hunting
      >
      > FYI, from the Calif Fish and Game Q&A page today. Many birders probably
      > already know that all those gunshots you hear on Sept 1 are dove hunters.
      >
      > Question: I have a question pertaining to Eurasian doves. I have heard
      > they
      > are an invasive species and compete for food and shelter with the native
      > mourning doves. I believe they are open game during dove season and do not
      > count towards a personal limit. Can the Eurasians be hunted year-round? In
      > the last couple of years their population has grown extensively near
      > where I
      > live. If they are open year-round, I was thinking of thinning the herd a
      > bit. (Mike G.)
      >
      > Answer: While it's very nice of you to offer to help in "thinning the
      > herd",
      > Eurasian doves can only be taken during the regular season. Otherwise,
      > year-round hunting for this one species would create an enforcement
      > nightmare for the game wardens. Eurasian doves are invasive and are living
      > with, and competing with, native species. However, at this point they
      > do not
      > seem to be gaining the advantage over the native species. Keep in mind
      > that
      > there is no limit on Eurasian collared doves when the season is open
      > (Sept.
      > 1-15 and Nov. 14 - Dec 28).
      >
      > Steve Hampton
      > ________________
      > Resource Economist
      > Office of Spill Prevention and Response
      > California Dept of Fish and Game
      > PO Box 944209
      > Sacramento, CA 94244-2090
      > -----------------------------------
      > (916) 323-4724 phone
      > (916) 324-8829 fax
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >


      --

      Rick Holbrook
      Fargo, ND
      N 46°53'251"
      W 096°48'279"


      Remember the USS Liberty
      http://www.ussliberty.org/

      Reply to: fholbrook(at)cableone.net








      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ken Burton
      In the For-What-It s-Worth Department, Mourning Dove does show a significant decline on BBS routes in California from 1966-2007. There was a non-significant
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 19, 2010
        In the For-What-It's-Worth Department, Mourning Dove does show a
        significant decline on BBS routes in California from 1966-2007. There
        was a non-significant decline from 1980-2007 after a non-significant
        increase from 1966-1979. Of course, it would be foolish to blame this
        on collared-doves, which weren't even around during most of the
        "decline," but it would be equally foolish to say off-handedly that
        mourning doves are doing fine.

        Coincidentally, I'm writing an article on the collared-dove in which I
        call for studies of its interactions with and impacts on native species.
        One piece of information I haven't been able to sleuth out is an
        explanation of the specific name, decaocto. "Ten-eight"? Doesn't make
        much sense to me. Can anyone elucidate?

        Thanks.

        Ken Burton
        Arcata

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Alvaro Jaramillo" <chucao@...>
        To: "'Steve Hampton'" <shampton@...>;
        <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 9:55 AM
        Subject: RE: [CALBIRDS] Eurasian Collared-Doves and hunting


        > Thanks Steve,
        >
        >
        >
        > I am amazed that Fish and Game say "they do not seem to be gaining
        > an
        > advantage over native species." I would have been much more
        > comfortable
        > with, "we do not know.." Subjectively speaking here in my neck of the
        > woods
        > Mourning Doves are less common now than when the Collared Dove
        > arrived;
        > however Collared Doves are much more local in their distribution
        > preferring
        > towns and farm buildings, rather than open fields, and less disturbed
        > sites.
        > In these places there are as many Mourning Doves as there have ever
        > been. I
        > would not be surprised if at the small scale Collareds are really
        > hammering
        > Mournings, but at the global scale there is no real threat to Mourning
        > Doves. Subjectively speaking, but it would be great for someone to do
        > a
        > study.
        >
        >
        >
        > Alvaro
        >
        >
        >
        > Alvaro Jaramillo
        >
        > chucao@...
        >
        > Half Moon Bay, California
        >
        >
        >
        > Field Guides - Birding Tours Worldwide
        >
        > www.fieldguides.com
        >
        > _____
        >
        > From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On
        > Behalf
        > Of Steve Hampton
        > Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 9:40 AM
        > To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [CALBIRDS] Eurasian Collared-Doves and hunting
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > FYI, from the Calif Fish and Game Q&A page today. Many birders
        > probably
        > already know that all those gunshots you hear on Sept 1 are dove
        > hunters.
        >
        > Question: I have a question pertaining to Eurasian doves. I have heard
        > they
        > are an invasive species and compete for food and shelter with the
        > native
        > mourning doves. I believe they are open game during dove season and do
        > not
        > count towards a personal limit. Can the Eurasians be hunted
        > year-round? In
        > the last couple of years their population has grown extensively near
        > where I
        > live. If they are open year-round, I was thinking of thinning the herd
        > a
        > bit. (Mike G.)
        >
        > Answer: While it's very nice of you to offer to help in "thinning the
        > herd",
        > Eurasian doves can only be taken during the regular season. Otherwise,
        > year-round hunting for this one species would create an enforcement
        > nightmare for the game wardens. Eurasian doves are invasive and are
        > living
        > with, and competing with, native species. However, at this point they
        > do not
        > seem to be gaining the advantage over the native species. Keep in mind
        > that
        > there is no limit on Eurasian collared doves when the season is open
        > (Sept.
        > 1-15 and Nov. 14 - Dec 28).
        >
        > Steve Hampton
        > ________________
        > Resource Economist
        > Office of Spill Prevention and Response
        > California Dept of Fish and Game
        > PO Box 944209
        > Sacramento, CA 94244-2090
        > -----------------------------------
        > (916) 323-4724 phone
        > (916) 324-8829 fax
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
      • Kimball Garrett
        Ken et al., I could say they re named decaocto because they re so ten-eight-ious, but Jobling, in A Dictionary of Scientifc Bird Names, says: Decaocto L.
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 19, 2010
          Ken et al.,

          I could say they're named decaocto because they're so ten-eight-ious,
          but Jobling, in A Dictionary of Scientifc Bird Names, says:
          "Decaocto L. dec-, ten; octo, eight. Greek myth. A hard-worked
          maidservant, bemoaning her pay of miserly 18 piece a year, prayed for
          release and was changed by the gods into a dove that echoed her mournful
          cries." [Little did she know she would take over the world!]

          Apropos of Steve's comment about hunting, I would encourage whatever
          small percentage of you on this listserve who are also dove hunters, to
          check with your local museum/university bird collection to see if they
          want you to bag a few (with full data) for science. Developing a decent
          series individuals from recently colonizing species can have great value
          in population genetics, evolutionary studies of morphological
          adaptation, etc. We probably still lack specimens of ECDove from most
          California counties.

          Kimball

          Kimball L. Garrett
          Ornithology Collections Manager
          Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
          900 Exposition Blvd.
          Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
          213-763-3368
          kgarrett@...


          -----Original Message-----
          From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of Ken Burton
          Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 11:04 AM
          To: 'Steve Hampton'; CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com; Alvaro Jaramillo
          Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Eurasian Collared-Doves and hunting

          Coincidentally, I'm writing an article on the collared-dove in which I
          call for studies of its interactions with and impacts on native species.

          One piece of information I haven't been able to sleuth out is an
          explanation of the specific name, decaocto. "Ten-eight"? Doesn't make
          much sense to me. Can anyone elucidate?
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