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Western Birds 41(1) mini-abstracts

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  • Joseph Morlan
    Summaries prepared by Ted Floyd. More information at: http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/ =================================================== Here is a
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 1, 2010
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      Summaries prepared by Ted Floyd. More information at:

      http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/

      ===================================================

      Here is a summary of the contents of vol. 41 no. 1 (2010) of the
      quarterly journal Western Birds, published by Western Field
      Ornithologists.

      * EGG-TURNING BEHAVIOR AND NEST ATTENTIVENESS OF THE ENDANGERED HAWAIIAN
      GOOSE ON KAUAI.
      * by WESLEY W. WEATHERS and BRENDA J. ZAUN.
      * pp. 2-9.
      * A study of the Hawaiian Goose (Nene) employed remote video cameras to
      study parental behavior at two nests on Kauai, Hawaii. Even though the
      Hawaiian Goose breeds at latitudes lower than most other geese, the
      video revealed egg-turning behavior similar to that reported for other
      waterfowl and, in particular, the closely related Canada Goose.

      * A NEW AND CRYPTIC CALL TYPE OF THE RED CROSSBILL.
      * by KENNETH IRWIN.
      * pp. 10-25.
      * Acoustic, morphometric, and ecological analyses from Humboldt County,
      California, reveal a new call type (type 10) of the Red Crossbill
      complex. Type 10 Red Crossbills specialize on Sitka spruce cones, a food
      resource previously predicted to have a Red Crossbill call type
      associated with it. Type 10 Red Crossbills may be differentiated from
      other Red Crossbills by flight calls, "chitter" calls, song repertoires,
      feeding ecology, and slight differences in average body size and bill
      depth.

      * A REASSESSMENT OF HOMOLOGIES IN THE VOCAL REPERTOIRES OF PHOEBES.
      * by D. ARCHIBALD McCALLUM and NATHAN D. PIEPLOW.
      * pp. 26-43.
      * A study of dawn singing clarifies homologous (primitive, or ancestral)
      song elements of three flycatchers in the genus Sayornis. The Say's
      Phoebe uses three song elements, whereas the Black and Eastern phoebes
      use only two each. A key to establishing these homologies was
      spectrographic analysis of the vocalizations of a hybrid Black x Eastern
      Phoebe with a song like a Say's Phoebe.

      * GROUND-NESTING MARBLED MURRELETS IN JUNEAU, ALASKA.
      * by MARY F. WILLSON, KATHERINE M. HOCKER, and ROBERT H. ARMSTRONG.
      * pp. 44-48.
      * Observations, photographs, and detailed descriptions establish the
      occurrence of three ground nests of Marbled Murrelets in forests around
      Juneau, Alaska. In the well-forested Juneau area, Marbled Murrelets nest
      both in trees (like breeders to the south) and on the ground (like
      breeders to the north and west).

      * TWO ORIENTAL TURTLE-DOVES (Streptopelia orientalis) REACH CALIFORNIA.
      * by JON L. DUNN and KEITH HANSEN.
      * pp. 49-54.
      * An Oriental Turtle-Dove was reported from Inyo County, California, 29
      October 1988, and another was reported from Marin County, California,
      9-31 December 2002. Both reports have been accepted by the California
      Bird Records Committee, and both are assumed, but not proven, to refer
      to the migratory nominate subspecies.

      * A LITTLE BUNTING REACHES BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR.
      * by KURT A. RADAMAKER and DAVID J. POWELL.
      * pp. 55-58.
      * A Little Bunting, likely an immature, was found and photographed on
      the Vizcaino Peninsula, Baja California Sur, 8 October 2008. The species
      is casual during the fall in western Alaska, but this individual was
      only the third ever reported in North America south of Alaska, and it
      was the first reported in Mexico.

      * BOOK REVIEW.
      * reviewed by CHRIS BUTLER.
      * pp. 59-60.
      * Review of "Avian Invasions: The Ecology and Evolution of Exotic Birds"
      (2009), by Tim M. Blackburn, Julie L. Lockwood, and Phillip Cassey.

      * BOOK REVIEW.
      * reviewed by OSCAR JOHNSON.
      * pp. 60-61.
      * Review of "Birds of the US-Mexico Borderlands: Distribution, Ecology,
      and Conservation" (2008), edited by Janet Ruth, Tim Brush, and David
      Krueper.

      * FEATURED PHOTO--BLACK-CHINNED SPARROW: NOTES ON BREEDING BEHAVIOR AND
      NESTING ECOLOGY IN SAN DIEGO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.
      * by LORI HARGROVE.
      * pp. 62-67.
      * An observational study of the poorly known Black-chinned Sparrow
      establishes quantitative data on spring arrival dates, territory
      establishment, nest placement, nest construction, nesting dates, clutch
      size, egg and nestling survival, behavior and morphology of nestlings
      and fledglings, and adult attendance.

      Please note that vols. 1-38 (1970-2007) of Western Birds are permanently
      archived and fully searchable online: http://tiny.cc/Y2sa5. The service
      is free to the public, and is made available by Western Field
      Ornithologists (WFO) and the Searchable Ornithological Research Archive
      (SORA). Full abstracts of research articles and the full text for
      "Featured Photos" (vols. 38-41) are available online:
      http://tiny.cc/luCHf.
      --
      Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA jmorlan (at) ccsf.edu
      SF Birding Classes start Sep 14 http://fog.ccsf.edu/jmorlan/
      California Bird Records Committee http://www.californiabirds.org/
      Western Field Ornithologists http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/
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