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Re: [inlandcountybirds] (alleged) Acadian Flycatcher comments

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  • Lori Conrad
    Hi all Here s my 2 cents, for what it s worth. Mark & I were at Silver Saddle & saw this flycatcher, the alleged Acadian. The only definite thing that we can
    Message 1 of 2 , May 20, 2009
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      Hi all

      Here's my 2 cents, for what it's worth.

      Mark & I were at Silver Saddle & saw this flycatcher, the "alleged" Acadian. The only definite thing that we can say is that it was NOT a Western/Pac. Slope. As for what exactly it was, that may remain a mystery due to the lack of definitive pics. Like Tom, I remained back to let Steve take the pics. This did allow me to study the bird, though I wish now that I had taken some video. Based on several field marks, & through process of elimination, we felt Acadian was the right call.

      Reasons are:

      1. The bird had a long tail, & long primary projection, ending beyond the beginning of the coverts & upper tail. The pics do not seem to show this.

      2. The eyering was fairly distinct, & round, with a tiny bit more white behind the eye, not the oval shaped eyering that Steve's pics somehow depict. Maybe it was the angle of the shot?

      3. The bill was enormous; long, all pale lower mandible & VERY broad based. almost "home plate" shaped, more than triangular, esp. when seem from directly below. Large head, heavy bodied. Peaked crown.

      4. The throat was pale, the wings were very dark, the back was dark green, the belly & coverts were yellow. It also had a greenish breast, with a small area of paleness just below the green, before the yellow began.

      5. The whole jizz of the bird when seen in person was not at all suggestive of Western/Pac. Slope. (Unless he was given steroids by A-Rod's trainer!) :-)

      This bird jumped out at you when you saw it, definitely different from all of the other empids that were present that morning. Wish there were better pics......

      Lori & Mark Conrad
      Hermosa Beach, Ca



      .
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: thomasgezamiko
      To: inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2009 12:02 PM
      Subject: [inlandcountybirds] (alleged) Acadian Flycatcher comments





      Hi Folks,

      As one of the birders with Steve when the bird was discovered, I would like to point out some things:

      1) The shape and proportions of the eye ring are not well-represented in the photograph.

      2) We (collectively) had lots of looks at the bird, from many different angles.

      2.5) All of us who looked at the bird had already spent a lot of time staring at Dusky, Gray, Pacific-slope, Hammond's, and Willow Flycatchers over the last week, or so.

      3) Three of us attempted repeatedly to photograph the bird, but these darn modern digital SLRs' autofocus keeps glomming onto branches closer or further than the object of one's desire. Two of us had videocameras, and did not (should have!) videoed the bird (I assumed that I would have the same autofocus problems, and didn't bother). Finally, we decided that since Steve is a trained, professional photographer, that we would stay back, and let him be "the" photographer.

      4) The bird's head shape, and overall jizz were just wrong for Western Flycatcher i.e. any western empid.

      5) The bird's throat was whitish. I had the same problems with color while looking at a Tennessee warbler last year with a bunch of birders out in the SBDCo desert, last fall: as far as I could see, it was just a grungy Orange-crowned Warbler in a cottonwood. As soon as that bird moved into a different part of the tree, it no longer reflected the green and yellow colors of the cottonwood's leaves, and it "turned into" an easy-to-recognize Tennessee.

      I'm open to being wrong, and always try to use these occasons to learn & improve. Unfortunately, this was one of those "you had to be there" situations. I remain convinced that this was an eastern empid.

      I have not heard back off-line from some of the other birders who saw the bird. I sent them my write-up, and have been hoping/assuming that they would email me a copy of their written descriptions(?). I told them not to read mine, until they write their's.

      Written, as usual, without my reading glasses,

      Tom Miko

      PS: Man, I hope Galileo doesn't go bankrupt, and shut down. Since there are no customers, we birders can actually get a room on the weekends, now. Normally, only members can get a room on the weekends, but they're hurtin' for customers. I deliberately ate in the restaurant, to spend money there (although I regretted it: the food was worse than elementary school cafeteria food).





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Doug Aguillard
      If your not into my ranting----then delete now-- you ve been fairly warned Having just returned from South Texas where I saw several Acadian Flycatchers, I
      Message 2 of 2 , May 20, 2009
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        If your not into my ranting----then delete now-- you've been fairly warned



        Having just returned from South Texas where I saw several Acadian
        Flycatchers, I would say that the bird in the pictures is a Western-type
        Flycatcher, but I think most people are missing a VERY IMPORTANT point!
        Whether this bird is, or is not an Acadian Flycatcher, it will probably
        never be proven, but what is important is this. The Observers (ALL 5-6 of
        them) thought that it was an Acadian Flycatcher.



        I am probably the biggest whiner in the State, when I find out that an
        extreme rarity was seen, and not reported to the general birding public for
        whatever reason other than restricted or private property.



        With all of the communication tools available to us (and the original finder
        of this bird is a communication tech whiz), There was absolutely no reason
        why these observers did not notify others as to the presence of the bird, so
        that others could run out to Kern and attempt to see the bird. It was found
        around mid-day, but not reported for almost 6 hours.



        I recognized several of the observer's names (as some of them are my
        friends), and realized that most of them are also some of the biggest
        complainers when it comes to others not reporting rare sightings, and then
        they pull this stunt? Most of these observers also should be fairly
        knowledgeable in the Status and Distribution of the State's birds, but yet-
        not one of them knew that Acadian Flycatcher was not on the State's list?



        I have tried to communicate with one of the observers, but so far I have
        received no response from that person. Those that know me, or know of me,
        know that, I call it like I see it, and I know I'll get flamed for this
        message by some, but come on folks, the only reason your on any of these
        listservs is to share information and to GET information.



        There's no excuse for what happen at Galileo last weekend. I guess we'll
        just be thankful that the bird in question will remain a question, and we
        did not miss a 1st State Record.



        Doug Aguillard

        San Diego, CA

        doug@...





        -----Original Message-----
        From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of Lori Conrad
        Sent: Wednesday, May 20, 2009 8:40 AM
        To: inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com; thomasgezamiko;
        kerncobirding@yahoogroups.com; Calbirds
        Subject: [CALBIRDS] Re: [inlandcountybirds] (alleged) Acadian Flycatcher
        comments



        Hi all



        Here's my 2 cents, for what it's worth.



        Mark & I were at Silver Saddle & saw this flycatcher, the "alleged" Acadian.
        The only definite thing that we can say is that it was NOT a Western/Pac.
        Slope. As for what exactly it was, that may remain a mystery due to the lack
        of definitive pics. Like Tom, I remained back to let Steve take the pics.
        This did allow me to study the bird, though I wish now that I had taken some
        video. Based on several field marks, & through process of elimination, we
        felt Acadian was the right call.



        Reasons are:



        1. The bird had a long tail, & long primary projection, ending beyond the
        beginning of the coverts & upper tail. The pics do not seem to show this.



        2. The eyering was fairly distinct, & round, with a tiny bit more white
        behind the eye, not the oval shaped eyering that Steve's pics somehow
        depict. Maybe it was the angle of the shot?



        3. The bill was enormous; long, all pale lower mandible & VERY broad based.
        almost "home plate" shaped, more than triangular, esp. when seem from
        directly below. Large head, heavy bodied. Peaked crown.



        4. The throat was pale, the wings were very dark, the back was dark green,
        the belly & coverts were yellow. It also had a greenish breast, with a small
        area of paleness just below the green, before the yellow began.



        5. The whole jizz of the bird when seen in person was not at all suggestive
        of Western/Pac. Slope. (Unless he was given steroids by A-Rod's trainer!)
        :-)



        This bird jumped out at you when you saw it, definitely different from all
        of the other empids that were present that morning. Wish there were better
        pics......



        Lori & Mark Conrad

        Hermosa Beach, Ca







        .

        ----- Original Message -----

        From: thomasgezamiko

        To: inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com

        Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2009 12:02 PM

        Subject: [inlandcountybirds] (alleged) Acadian Flycatcher comments











        Hi Folks,



        As one of the birders with Steve when the bird was discovered, I would
        like to point out some things:



        1) The shape and proportions of the eye ring are not well-represented in
        the photograph.



        2) We (collectively) had lots of looks at the bird, from many different
        angles.



        2.5) All of us who looked at the bird had already spent a lot of time
        staring at Dusky, Gray, Pacific-slope, Hammond's, and Willow Flycatchers
        over the last week, or so.



        3) Three of us attempted repeatedly to photograph the bird, but these darn
        modern digital SLRs' autofocus keeps glomming onto branches closer or
        further than the object of one's desire. Two of us had videocameras, and did
        not (should have!) videoed the bird (I assumed that I would have the same
        autofocus problems, and didn't bother). Finally, we decided that since Steve
        is a trained, professional photographer, that we would stay back, and let
        him be "the" photographer.



        4) The bird's head shape, and overall jizz were just wrong for Western
        Flycatcher i.e. any western empid.



        5) The bird's throat was whitish. I had the same problems with color while
        looking at a Tennessee warbler last year with a bunch of birders out in the
        SBDCo desert, last fall: as far as I could see, it was just a grungy
        Orange-crowned Warbler in a cottonwood. As soon as that bird moved into a
        different part of the tree, it no longer reflected the green and yellow
        colors of the cottonwood's leaves, and it "turned into" an easy-to-recognize
        Tennessee.



        I'm open to being wrong, and always try to use these occasons to learn &
        improve. Unfortunately, this was one of those "you had to be there"
        situations. I remain convinced that this was an eastern empid.



        I have not heard back off-line from some of the other birders who saw the
        bird. I sent them my write-up, and have been hoping/assuming that they would
        email me a copy of their written descriptions(?). I told them not to read
        mine, until they write their's.



        Written, as usual, without my reading glasses,



        Tom Miko



        PS: Man, I hope Galileo doesn't go bankrupt, and shut down. Since there
        are no customers, we birders can actually get a room on the weekends, now.
        Normally, only members can get a room on the weekends, but they're hurtin'
        for customers. I deliberately ate in the restaurant, to spend money there
        (although I regretted it: the food was worse than elementary school
        cafeteria food).











        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







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