Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

News from the California Bird Records Committee

Expand Messages
  • Kimball Garrett
    California Birders: The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting in Pacifica Friday evening, 18 January, and in San Jose all day Saturday, 19
    Message 1 of 25 , Jan 22, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      California Birders:

      The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting
      in Pacifica Friday evening, 18 January, and in San Jose all
      day Saturday, 19 January.

      Some items that may be of interest to California birders
      include:

      (1) Outgoing members Robb Hamilton, Michael Patten, and Peter
      Pyle have been replaced by Luke Cole, Michael Rogers, and Mike
      San Miguel [all outgoing members must sit off the committee for
      at least one year before being eligible for re-relection]. We
      particularly welcome Luke, who will serve on the CBRC for the
      first time. Guy McCaskie was re-elected as CBRC Secretary, Dick
      Erickson was re-elected as Chair, and Kimball Garrett was
      re-elected as Vice-Chair.

      (2) The Field List of California Birds (now out of stock) will
      be reprinted early this year, with all applicable updates and
      additions.

      (3) Review list changes:

      There were no additions to the review list, but the CBRC
      is keeping a close watch on the status of several species
      (including Cape May Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler, and Rusty
      Blackbird). However, the following species pairs --
      Masked/Nazca Booby and White/Black-backed Wagtail -- have been
      added to the review list; in other words, records of birds
      identified to the level those species pairs, but not to one
      or the other of the component species, will be reviewed by
      The Committee. {The Committee will also add Hawaiian/Galapagos
      Petrel to the review list should the AOU go forward with the
      proposed split of those taxa.]

      Reddish Egret has been removed from the Review List; records
      after 2001 will not be reviewed.

      (4) Blue Mockingbird, Melanotis caerulescens, has been placed on
      the Supplemental List (along with Falcated Duck, Crested Caracara,
      Gray Silky-Flycatcher, and Oriental Greenfinch). These are species
      where the correct identification has been accepted by The Committee,
      but which are not accepted to the main list because of questions
      about natural occurrence; however, the possibility of natural
      occurrence is considered high enough that a majority of CBRC members
      have voted to place them on this special list.

      The minutes of the CBRC annual meeting will eventually be posted on
      the CBRC web site: www.wfo-cbrc.org

      Kimball Garrett
      Vice-Chair, CBRC

      *****************************
      Kimball L. Garrett
      Ornithology Collections Manager
      Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
      900 Exposition Blvd.
      Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
      (213) 763-3368
      (213) 746-2999 FAX
      kgarrett@...
      *****************************
    • Kimball Garrett
      Birders, The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting in San Jose on 27-28 January. The three-year terms of Kristie Nelson, Peter Pyle, and
      Message 2 of 25 , Feb 1, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Birders,



        The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting in San
        Jose on 27-28 January.



        The three-year terms of Kristie Nelson, Peter Pyle, and John Sterling
        have expired. Elected to replace them are Scott Terrill, Alvaro
        Jaramillo, and Dave Compton. We particularly welcome Dave (of Santa
        Barbara), who will serve his first term on the CBRC.



        The Committee voted to modify its by-laws to reduce the number of voting
        members from 10 to 9. The advantages of having nine voting members
        (which restores the original make-up of the committee) include a quicker
        turnaround time in voting, the elimination of tie votes on procedural
        matters, and the elimination of the need to replace four expired terms
        every three years. Currently we face the potential for up to a 40%
        turnover of committee members every three years (up to 33% the other two
        years), which can create inconsistency in treatment of records. The
        Committee has been very mindful of the need for an infusion of new
        membership; to this end we eliminated several years ago eligibility for
        a second consecutive term. We have averaged over one new member per
        year over the last decade or so, and expect to continue to welcome new
        CBRC members on a consistent basis.



        One Review List change was made: Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus)
        has been added to the review list, and all records as of 2006 will
        undergo Committee review. The continental decline of this boreal forest
        breeder has been striking and alarming, and California records have
        declined from an average of 10+ per year to between 4 and 5 per year.
        For more information on the decline, query the Christmas Bird Count
        database http://www.audubon.org/bird/cbc/hr/index.html
        <http://www.audubon.org/bird/cbc/hr/index.html> These data show
        decadal averages in number of birds per party-hour declining from 17 in
        the 1960s and 12 in the 1970s to 0.8 in the 1980s and 0.2 in (and since)
        the 1990s. See also the brief review on the eBird web site:
        http://www.ebird.org/content/news/RUBL.html
        <http://www.ebird.org/content/news/RUBL.html>



        The Committee reaffirmed its desire to receive documentation of records
        in electronic format (word documents, jpeg files, DVD), but we continue
        to encourage the submission of hard copies of field notes, sketches, and
        other material if it augments electronic submissions. Documentation in
        digital format will speed our process of conversion to on-line record
        review, a process we continue to investigate and hope to implement
        within a couple of years.



        As for recent important Committee decisions, note that the Ringed
        Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma hornbyi) photographed off the northern Channel
        Islands, Santa Barbara Co., 2 Aug 2005 has been accepted, adding this
        species to the list of California (and North American) birds. This
        brings the California list to 630 species (620 native); other potential
        first state records in circulation include Parkinson's Petrel,
        Solander's Petrel, and Green Violet-ear.



        After the official portion of the meeting, Brian Sullivan updated the
        Committee on the status of eBird in California and we discussed ways to
        increase the rate of checklist submission from the state as well as ways
        in which the CBRC, North American Birds, and eBird can benefit each
        other.



        The Committee thanks H. T. Harvey and Associates for hosting the meeting
        and keeping participants well fed, Linda and Scott Terrill for gracious
        hospitality, Kristie Nelson, Peter Pyle and John Sterling for their
        service, and the continued hard work of the staff and volunteers of the
        Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology in maintaining CBRC archives.



        Kimball Garrett

        CBRC spokesperson



        Kimball L. Garrett

        Ornithology Collections Manager

        Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

        900 Exposition Blvd.

        Los Angeles CA 90007

        (213) 763-3368

        (213) 746-2999 FAX

        kgarrett@...





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kimball Garrett
        Birders, The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting in Carlsbad 26-27 January 2007. The terms of Committee members Jon Dunn, Matt Heindel
        Message 3 of 25 , Feb 7, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Birders,



          The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting in
          Carlsbad 26-27 January 2007. The terms of Committee members Jon Dunn,
          Matt Heindel and Marshall Iliff have expired; replacing them will be
          Kristie Nelson, Jim Pike, and Peter Pyle. We especially welcome Jim,
          who will be serving for the first time on the Committee. Guy McCaskie
          was re-elected CBRC Secretary, Dan Singer was elected Chair, and Joe
          Morlan was elected Vice-Chair.



          There were no by-law changes (apart from the adoption of some very minor
          grammatical corrections), and no changes were made in the Review List;
          we continue to keep tabs on non-review species which might be added to
          the Review List (including, but not limited to, Fulvous Whistling-Duck
          and Cape May and Bay-breasted warblers).



          Most of the meeting was spent discussing numerous procedural issues,
          specific records, issues regarding publications, discussions of
          potential future CBRC members (suggestions from the birding community
          received each year are much appreciated and always reviewed during the
          annual meeting), and discussions of specific identification issues
          (including, this year, Galapagos/Hawaiian Petrel, Glossy Ibis,
          Blue-headed Vireo, the Yellow Wagtail complex, and Smith's Longspur). In
          the always-scintillating discussion of introduced birds, the Committee
          agreed that a special effort will be made to pinpoint and publish upon
          the distribution and population size/trends of Nutmeg Mannikin (Lonchura
          punctulata), a species which appears to be approaching the Committee's
          criteria for acceptance of non-native species on the California list.



          Final editing work on the CBRC book "Rare Birds of California" has
          nearly been completed, with publication later this year. We continue to
          produce annual CBRC reports in Western Birds. This is an appropriate
          occasion to remind birders that all Western Birds papers (including CBRC
          reports) through 2004 are available as PDF files through SORA, and that
          the contents of Western Birds are now searchable by keyword at that
          site: http://elibrary.unm.edu/sora/index.php



          We are grateful to Matt and Ann Heindel for their hospitality in hosting
          this year's meeting, and as well to Matt for his dedicated service as
          CBRC Chair; we acknowledge the many important contributions of outgoing
          members Dunn, Heindel and Iliff.



          Kimball



          Kimball L. Garrett

          Ornithology Collections Manager

          Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

          900 Exposition Blvd.

          Los Angeles CA 90007

          (213) 763-3368

          (213) 746-2999 FAX

          kgarrett@...





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Kimball Garrett
          Birders, The California Bird Records Committee, a Committee of the Western Field Ornithologists, held its annual meeting in Los Gatos on 18-19 January 2008.
          Message 4 of 25 , Jan 23, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Birders,

            The California Bird Records Committee, a Committee of the Western Field
            Ornithologists, held its annual meeting in Los Gatos on 18-19 January
            2008. Our hosts were Scott and Linda Terrill and H. T. Harvey and
            Associates, to whom we are very grateful.

            Newly elected CBRC members were Jon Dunn, Brian Sullivan and Jim Tietz.
            They replace outgoing members Kimball Garrett, Joe Morlan and Dan
            Singer. Dave Compton takes over from Dan Singer as CBRC Chair, and Jon
            Dunn assumes the Vice-Chair from Joe Morlan. Guy McCaskie remains CBRC
            Secretary.

            Important changes were made to the Review List. No species were added,
            but the following species were DELETED from the review list: Manx
            Shearwater, Brown Booby, Yellow-throated Vireo, and Scarlet Tanager.
            Bear in mind that all of these species are still rare in California, and
            you should continue to submit thorough documentation for all records to
            the appropriate NAB Regional Editor or County Sub-Regional Editor.

            We thank the birding community for its continuing support of the CBRC.

            Kimball Garrett
            [CBRC Internet Spokesperson]

            Kimball L. Garrett
            Ornithology Collections Manager
            Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
            900 Exposition Blvd.
            Los Angeles CA 90007
            (213) 763-3368
            (213) 746-2999 FAX
            kgarrett@...
          • Kimball Garrett
            Birders, The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting 16-17 January 2009 at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. The committee thanks
            Message 5 of 25 , Jan 27, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Birders,



              The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting 16-17
              January 2009 at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. The
              committee thanks Paul Collins and Rebecca Coulter for their part in
              hosting the meeting.



              The three-year terms of Dave Compton (Chairman), Alvaro Jaramillo and
              Scott Terrill expired as of this year's meeting. Elected to fill their
              positions on the CBRC were Paul Lehman, Joe Morlan, and Dan Singer.
              Lehman was elected the new CBRC Chair, and Dan Singer is the new
              Vice-Chair. Guy McCaskie continues in his role as non-voting Secretary.



              Magnificent Frigatebird was added to the list of species for which
              records are reviewed by the CBRC. All records of this species beginning
              in 2009 will be reviewed.



              Deleted from the Review List were: Mottled Petrel, American
              Oystercatcher, and Sprague's Pipit.



              We want to remind everybody that the California Bird Records Committee
              web site is now located at: http://www.californiabirds.org/

              The CBRC remains a committee of Western Field Ornithologists and
              publishes reports annually in Western Birds; the CBRC site can also be
              accessed via a link on the WFO web site, which is
              http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org



              Kimball Garrett



              Kimball L. Garrett

              Ornithology Collections Manager

              Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

              900 Exposition Blvd.

              Los Angeles CA 90007

              (213) 763-3368

              (213) 746-2999 FAX

              kgarrett@...





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Kimball Garrett
              Birders, The Western Field Ornithologists California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting on 13-14 January 2012 in Los Gatos. The terms of members
              Message 6 of 25 , Jan 18, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Birders,



                The Western Field Ornithologists' California Bird Records Committee held
                its annual meeting on 13-14 January 2012 in Los Gatos. The terms of
                members Paul Lehman (CBRC chairman), Dan Singer (CBRC vice-chairman) and
                Joe Morlan expired; note that CBRC by-laws mandate three-year terms,
                with members eligible for reelection after taking a year or more off the
                committee. Members elected to take their place were Jon Dunn, Peter
                Pyle and Steve Rottenborn. The role of Chair will be filled by Kimball
                Garrett for the next year, with Dave Compton as vice-chair. Guy McCaskie
                continues in his role as CBRC Secretary.



                Two species were deleted from the CBRC Review List: Trumpeter Swan and
                Yellow-throated Warbler; records of these species beginning 1 January
                2012 will not be reviewed by the Committee. However, we urge those who
                observe these species (and all other rarities) in California to
                thoroughly document sightings and provide details to the appropriate
                North American Birds regional or sub-regional editor.



                We are grateful to H. T. Harvey and Associates for hosting the meeting
                and generously supplying the bagels, sandwiches and pizza that got us
                through many long discussions; many thanks to CBRC member Scott Terrill
                for arranging this.


                As always, detailed information about the CBRC and its review list and
                official state list, along with photos of rarities, can be found at:

                http://www.californiabirds.org/ Our thanks to Joe Morlan for
                maintaining this site and keeping it up to date, and to Jim Tietz for
                his help with the on-line CBRC database.



                Kimball L. Garrett

                Ornithology Collections Manager

                Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

                900 Exposition Blvd.

                Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

                213-763-3368

                kgarrett@...

                http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Kimball Garrett
                The California Bird Records Committee has accepted the record of a bean-goose present 9 November 2010 to 8 January 2011 at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National
                Message 7 of 25 , Jun 25, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  The California Bird Records Committee has accepted the record of a bean-goose present 9 November 2010 to 8 January 2011 at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge, Imperial County. The Committee endorsed the record as pertaining to "Taiga/Tundra Bean-Goose (Anser fabalis/serrirostris)" and that species-pair will be added to the California state bird list. Most Committee members felt that the bird was more likely a Taiga Bean-Goose, and three members voted to accept it as belonging to that species. Taiga/Tundra Bean-Goose is added to the list between Fulvous Whistling-Duck and Greater White-fronted Goose, and is also added to the review list. Research on variation and species-limits in this complex is ongoing, and it is possible that in the future the Unit 1 bird will be reassessed and accepted as one species of the other; it is also possible, of course, that the AOU committee decision to split these two species will eventually be reversed, in which case the bird would appear on the state list as Bean Goose (Anser fabalis).

                  Potential first state records of Common Crane (Grus grus), Northern Gannet (Morus bassanus), and Gray Hawk (Buteo plagiatus) are currently under review.

                  Kimball L. Garrett
                  Ornithology Collections Manager
                  Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
                  900 Exposition Blvd.
                  Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
                  213-763-3368
                  kgarrett@...
                  http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Kimball Garrett
                  Birders, The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting at the Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo on 18-19 January 2013.
                  Message 8 of 25 , Jan 23, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Birders,

                    The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting at the Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo on 18-19 January 2013. Below is a brief summary of actions relating to committee membership, the state list, and the review list. The CBRC web site < www.californiabirds.org<http://www.californiabirds.org> > has been updated by webmaster Joe Morlan to reflect these actions.

                    Joseph Morlan, Adam Searcy and Dan Singer were elected to three-year terms on the Committee. We welcome back Joe, who will serve as CBRC Chair, and Dan, who will be Vice-Chair; Adam will be serving his first term on the Committee. Rotating off the committee are Dave Compton, Kimball Garrett and Oscar Johnson.

                    After discussion, the Committee let stand its final decisions to add Taiga/Tundra Bean-Goose (from Imperial Co.) and Common Crane (Del Norte Co.) to the California state list. Taiga/Tundra Bean-Goose (Anser fabalis/serrirostris) is placed on the California list between Fulvous Whistling-Duck and Greater White-fronted Goose, with a "P" symbol. Common Crane (Grus grus) is placed on the checklist after Sandhill Crane, also with a "P" symbol. Both the crane and the goose get an asterisk, indicating that they have been added to the review list. Acceptance of these two taxa brings the California state list to 651 species (including 10 established introduced species). An additional photographic record of Common Crane is under review.

                    The following species will be removed from the review list:
                    Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (regular breeding population in San Diego Co., possibly Ventura Co.)
                    Harris's Hawk (regular breeding in s. San Diego Co.)
                    Lesser Black-backed Gull (has averaged >7 accepted records of new individuals per year over the past 10 years)
                    Parakeet Auklet (large numbers in recent years well off n. CA in winter, early spring)
                    As always, records of these four species (and all rarities) should still be documented and sent to appropriate North American Birds sub-regional editors.

                    Among the many additional topics discussed was the increasing and unfortunate trend toward "photo-only" submissions of records. We urge observers to provide written context with all photo submissions, including circumstances of the sighting, description of behaviors and vocalizations (and anything else not evident in photographs), and other pertinent details.

                    The CBRC thanks its outgoing members for their service, Linnea Hall and Adam Searcy of the WFVZ for hosting our meeting, and all of the observers who have submitted documentation of records to the CBRC over the past year.

                    Kimball L. Garrett
                    Ornithology Collections Manager
                    Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
                    900 Exposition Blvd.
                    Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
                    213-763-3368
                    kgarrett@...
                    http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Kimball Garrett
                    Birders, Recent decisions by the California Bird Records Committee have added two new species to the California state list: Great Black-backed Gull (Larus
                    Message 9 of 25 , Sep 4, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment

                      Birders,

                       

                      Recent decisions by the California Bird Records Committee have added two new species to the California state list:

                      Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus) is added by the acceptance of a record of an adult at the northwest corner of the Salton Sea RIV 01-05 May 2013 (CBRC#2013-057); it is placed on the California list after Glaucous Gull, and is also placed on the CBRC review list.

                      Nutmeg Mannikin (Lonchura punctulata) is added by acceptance of a package of information (CBRC #2013-085) showing that it has met the CBRC’s criteria for addition to the California state list as an introduced species.  It represents a new family (Estrildidae: Estrildid finches) for the California list and is placed at the end of the list following House Sparrow.  Note that the name “Nutmeg Mannikin” is not the English name used in most of the native range of this species, and it is possible that the name will be changed by the AOU to “Scaly-breasted Munia” in the future.  Also, the ABA Checklist Committee is currently voting on the addition of Nutmeg Mannikin to the ABA list, with a decision due very soon.

                       

                      The CBRC has also updated the official state list to conform to the 54th supplement of the AOU Check-List (published in July 2013).  This action adds one more species to the California state list: Sagebrush Sparrow (Artemisiospiza nevadensis) is added to the list immediately before Artemisiospiza belli (which is now given the English name “Bell’s Sparrow).  Several additional changes from the 54th supplement involving generic names and species sequences are also incorporated into the CBRC list.

                       

                      All of these changes bring the California state list to 655 species, of which 11 are established introductions.

                      State list: www.californiabirds.org/ca_list.asp

                      Review list: www.californiabirds.org/review.asp

                      Change log: http://www.californiabirds.org/ChangeLog.html

                       

                      Many thanks to Joe Morlan for keeping the CBRC web site updated with these changes.

                       

                      Kimball L. Garrett

                      Ornithology Collections Manager

                      Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

                      900 Exposition Blvd.

                      Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

                      213-763-3368

                      kgarrett@...

                      http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology

                       

                    • Ali Sheehey
                      Birders. I continue to wonder about the bias against accepting non-migratory established exotics. When a well documented vagrant with a single occurrence is
                      Message 10 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Birders.

                        I continue to wonder about the bias against accepting non-migratory established exotics. When a well documented vagrant with a single occurrence is countable but psittacid populations that continue to experience exponential growth are not considered because of limited geographic distribution owing to their non migratory habits, I scratch my head.

                        As the documenter of Bakersfield's Rose-ringed Parakeet population, it becomes apparent that even though this population has satisfied every criteria for inclusion, it remains off the California list.

                        Other populations within the state of this species may not be stable owing to competition from other more robust psittacid species but the Bakersfield population does not have the same pressure.

                        I wouldn't be comfortable including rose-rings on my list beyond Bakersfield but I would add Nanday Parakeet from Malibu or Lilac-crowned Parrot from Temple City. The establishment of these birds is highly localized but stable by all accounts.

                        IMHO, if one is going to have any exotics on the list, then all that meet the criteria as established should be considered without bias.

                        Respectfully yours in nature,

                        Ali

                        Alison Sheehey
                        PO Box 153
                        Weldon, CA 93283

                        natureali@...
                        www.facebook.com/NaturesAli
                        www.natureali.org
                        www.flickr.com/photos/natureali
                      • Douglas Aguillard
                        Ali, I also have wondered the same. The Lilac-crowned population in San Diego seems to be a 2-1 larger than the Red-crowned. The Magpie Jays in the Tijuana
                        Message 11 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Ali,
                           
                          I also have wondered the same. The Lilac-crowned population in San Diego seems to be a 2-1 larger than the Red-crowned. The Magpie Jays in the Tijuana River valley have been around for over 10 years, and the population does grow and move around the south County, but will probably never make the list.
                           
                          But with all things, the CBRC and ABA only have the power, when your willing to let them have it. So you can make up your own State list if you wish to.
                           
                          Doug Aguillard
                          San Diego, CA
                          On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 7:18 AM, Ali Sheehey <natureali@...> wrote:
                           

                          Birders.

                          I continue to wonder about the bias against accepting non-migratory established exotics. When a well documented vagrant with a single occurrence is countable but psittacid populations that continue to experience exponential growth are not considered because of limited geographic distribution owing to their non migratory habits, I scratch my head.

                          As the documenter of Bakersfield's Rose-ringed Parakeet population, it becomes apparent that even though this population has satisfied every criteria for inclusion, it remains off the California list.

                          Other populations within the state of this species may not be stable owing to competition from other more robust psittacid species but the Bakersfield population does not have the same pressure.

                          I wouldn't be comfortable including rose-rings on my list beyond Bakersfield but I would add Nanday Parakeet from Malibu or Lilac-crowned Parrot from Temple City. The establishment of these birds is highly localized but stable by all accounts.

                          IMHO, if one is going to have any exotics on the list, then all that meet the criteria as established should be considered without bias.

                          Respectfully yours in nature,

                          Ali

                          Alison Sheehey
                          PO Box 153
                          Weldon, CA 93283

                          natureali@...
                          www.facebook.com/NaturesAli
                          www.natureali.org
                          www.flickr.com/photos/natureali




                          --
                          Doug Aguillard
                          Photojournalist
                          San Diego, CA
                           
                        • Steve Hampton
                          Good discussion about when to accept non-natives as established. The removal of Ringed Turtle Dove from the ABA list, the crash of Crested Mynas, and the
                          Message 12 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Good discussion about when to accept non-natives as established.  

                            The removal of Ringed Turtle Dove from the ABA list, the crash of Crested Mynas, and the recent crash of Spotted Doves also causes one to pause, as these examples suggest that the population dynamics of some species, depending on their ecological context, follow much longer patterns of expansion and collapse than we might expect.  Thus, what appears to be "established" might just be circling the drain.  





                            On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 11:36 AM, Douglas Aguillard <dwaguillard@...> wrote:
                             

                            Ali,
                             
                            I also have wondered the same. The Lilac-crowned population in San Diego seems to be a 2-1 larger than the Red-crowned. The Magpie Jays in the Tijuana River valley have been around for over 10 years, and the population does grow and move around the south County, but will probably never make the list.
                             
                            But with all things, the CBRC and ABA only have the power, when your willing to let them have it. So you can make up your own State list if you wish to.
                             
                            Doug Aguillard
                            San Diego, CA
                            On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 7:18 AM, Ali Sheehey <natureali@...> wrote:
                             

                            Birders.

                            I continue to wonder about the bias against accepting non-migratory established exotics. When a well documented vagrant with a single occurrence is countable but psittacid populations that continue to experience exponential growth are not considered because of limited geographic distribution owing to their non migratory habits, I scratch my head.

                            As the documenter of Bakersfield's Rose-ringed Parakeet population, it becomes apparent that even though this population has satisfied every criteria for inclusion, it remains off the California list.

                            Other populations within the state of this species may not be stable owing to competition from other more robust psittacid species but the Bakersfield population does not have the same pressure.

                            I wouldn't be comfortable including rose-rings on my list beyond Bakersfield but I would add Nanday Parakeet from Malibu or Lilac-crowned Parrot from Temple City. The establishment of these birds is highly localized but stable by all accounts.

                            IMHO, if one is going to have any exotics on the list, then all that meet the criteria as established should be considered without bias.

                            Respectfully yours in nature,

                            Ali

                            Alison Sheehey
                            PO Box 153
                            Weldon, CA 93283

                            natureali@...
                            www.facebook.com/NaturesAli
                            www.natureali.org
                            www.flickr.com/photos/natureali




                            --
                            Doug Aguillard
                            Photojournalist
                            San Diego, CA
                             




                            --
                            Steve Hampton
                            Davis, CA
                          • borodayko2000
                            I m in the camp of being cautious of adding exotics to the official list. Because the gene pool is limited, it is possible for the specie to die out even if it
                            Message 13 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I'm in the camp of being cautious of adding exotics to the official list. Because the gene pool is limited, it is possible for the specie to die out even if it was abundant at one time. A case in point is the Crested Myna in Vancouver, BC. It was abundant and is now extirpated. The Spotted Dove is heading in that direction. We don't need extirpated species on the state list.

                              The one time vagrants are common elsewhere so one could return again unaided. The only way to have exotics return is to release some more pets into the wild. That is not a good thing.

                              Regards, Al Borodayko
                              Cypress, CA

                              --- In CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com, Douglas Aguillard <dwaguillard@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Ali,
                              >
                              > I also have wondered the same. The Lilac-crowned population in San Diego
                              > seems to be a 2-1 larger than the Red-crowned. The Magpie Jays in the
                              > Tijuana River valley have been around for over 10 years, and the population
                              > does grow and move around the south County, but will probably never make
                              > the list.
                              >
                              > But with all things, the CBRC and ABA only have the power, when your
                              > willing to let them have it. So you can make up your own State list if you
                              > wish to.
                              >
                              > Doug Aguillard
                              > San Diego, CA
                              > dwaguillard@...
                              >
                              > On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 7:18 AM, Ali Sheehey <natureali@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > > **
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Birders.
                              > >
                              > > I continue to wonder about the bias against accepting non-migratory
                              > > established exotics. When a well documented vagrant with a single
                              > > occurrence is countable but psittacid populations that continue to
                              > > experience exponential growth are not considered because of limited
                              > > geographic distribution owing to their non migratory habits, I scratch my
                              > > head.
                              > >
                              > > As the documenter of Bakersfield's Rose-ringed Parakeet population, it
                              > > becomes apparent that even though this population has satisfied every
                              > > criteria for inclusion, it remains off the California list.
                              > >
                              > > Other populations within the state of this species may not be stable owing
                              > > to competition from other more robust psittacid species but the Bakersfield
                              > > population does not have the same pressure.
                              > >
                              > > I wouldn't be comfortable including rose-rings on my list beyond
                              > > Bakersfield but I would add Nanday Parakeet from Malibu or Lilac-crowned
                              > > Parrot from Temple City. The establishment of these birds is highly
                              > > localized but stable by all accounts.
                              > >
                              > > IMHO, if one is going to have any exotics on the list, then all that meet
                              > > the criteria as established should be considered without bias.
                              > >
                              > > Respectfully yours in nature,
                              > >
                              > > Ali
                              > >
                              > > Alison Sheehey
                              > > PO Box 153
                              > > Weldon, CA 93283
                              > >
                              > > natureali@...
                              > > www.facebook.com/NaturesAli
                              > > www.natureali.org
                              > > www.flickr.com/photos/natureali
                              > >
                              > >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > --
                              > Doug Aguillard
                              > Photojournalist
                              > military-fotos.com <http://www.military-fotos.com>
                              > militarypress.cm
                              > photorecon.net <http://www.photorecon.net>
                              > San Diego, CA
                              > dwaguillard@...
                              >
                            • Kurt Radamaker
                              Hi Doug, Ali   Before Rosy-faced Lovebird A.K.A Peach-faced Lovebird was officially accepted to the ABA list in 2012, as a member of the Arizona Bird
                              Message 14 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Hi Doug, Ali
                                 
                                Before Rosy-faced Lovebird A.K.A Peach-faced Lovebird was officially accepted to the ABA list in 2012, as a member of the Arizona Bird Committee, I often had birders ask me why the Lovebird was not on the Arizona or ABA List. It was clear to AZ birders that Rosy-faced Lovebirds had been established for a long time and had a viable and expanding population in Phoenix. Birders around PHX would see them all the time, and they were hard to miss at popular birding locations like the Gilbert Water Ranch.
                                 
                                The reason they were not on the AZ State or ABA list was simple. No one had done the research and work to consolidate Lovebird information and publish the results. So around 2008 I decided to research the Lovebird and publish my findings. The first step was to determine the population size and range, so I set up a Lovebird Census in 2009. 65 people participated and we found around 1000 lovebirds that day. Troy Corman and I researched the Lovebirds for the next year and published our results in the peer-reviewed Journal Arizona Birds Online http://www.azfo.org/journal/Rosy-facedLovebird2011.html
                                 
                                After our research was published, we submitted our findings to the Arizona Bird Committee (ABC) for acceptance to the Arizona State List. On 28 December 2011, the Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted to the Arizona State List http://abc.azfo.org/news/default.html
                                 
                                Once Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted by the ABC, I submitted a formal request to the ABA-CLC to review Rosy-faced Lovebird for acceptance to the ABA list. The submission and journal article were reviewed and Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted.
                                 
                                I don't believe bird records committee have any negative bias toward exotics. It is just much harder (requires research, writing, and commitment) to determine whether an exotic species is established over a vagrant occurring in the state. To determine if an exotic is established may take years, the ABA-CLC requires at least 15 years.
                                 
                                So, if you believe Rose-ringed Parakeets or Black-throated Magpie Jays meet the ABA-CLC criteria http://aba.org/checklist/exotics.html I encourage you to do a census, research, publish and submit your findings to the California Bird Records Committee. I'm sure the CBRC would welcome it. I know the Arizona Bird Committee would.
                                 
                                Best
                                 
                                Kurt Radamaker
                                Cave Creek, AZ
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                                 
                              • Ed Stonick
                                HI Kurt! That s a good and important idea--to have the science behind the establishment of a new species for the list. Just wondering if anyone s studied the
                                Message 15 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  HI Kurt!

                                  That's a good and important idea--to have the science behind the establishment of a new species for the list.

                                  Just wondering if anyone's studied the Orange Bishop.  Seems that species has been around about as long as the Mannikin albeit in smaller numbers.

                                  Regards,
                                  Ed

                                  Ed Stonick
                                  Pasadena, CA

                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: Kurt Radamaker
                                  Sent: Sep 5, 2013 12:28 PM
                                  To: "calbirds@yahoogroups.com"
                                  Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Re: News from the California Bird Records Committee

                                   

                                  Hi Doug, Ali
                                   
                                  Before Rosy-faced Lovebird A.K.A Peach-faced Lovebird was officially accepted to the ABA list in 2012, as a member of the Arizona Bird Committee, I often had birders ask me why the Lovebird was not on the Arizona or ABA List. It was clear to AZ birders that Rosy-faced Lovebirds had been established for a long time and had a viable and expanding population in Phoenix. Birders around PHX would see them all the time, and they were hard to miss at popular birding locations like the Gilbert Water Ranch.
                                   
                                  The reason they were not on the AZ State or ABA list was simple. No one had done the research and work to consolidate Lovebird information and publish the results. So around 2008 I decided to research the Lovebird and publish my findings. The first step was to determine the population size and range, so I set up a Lovebird Census in 2009. 65 people participated and we found around 1000 lovebirds that day. Troy Corman and I researched the Lovebirds for the next year and published our results in the peer-reviewed Journal Arizona Birds Online http://www.azfo.org/journal/Rosy-facedLovebird2011.html
                                   
                                  After our research was published, we submitted our findings to the Arizona Bird Committee (ABC) for acceptance to the Arizona State List. On 28 December 2011, the Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted to the Arizona State List http://abc.azfo.org/news/default.html
                                   
                                  Once Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted by the ABC, I submitted a formal request to the ABA-CLC to review Rosy-faced Lovebird for acceptance to the ABA list. The submission and journal article were reviewed and Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted.
                                   
                                  I don't believe bird records committee have any negative bias toward exotics. It is just much harder (requires research, writing, and commitment) to determine whether an exotic species is established over a vagrant occurring in the state. To determine if an exotic is established may take years, the ABA-CLC requires at least 15 years.
                                   
                                  So, if you believe Rose-ringed Parakeets or Black-throated Magpie Jays meet the ABA-CLC criteria http://aba.org/checklist/exotics.html I encourage you to do a census, research, publish and submit your findings to the California Bird Records Committee. I'm sure the CBRC would welcome it. I know the Arizona Bird Committee would.
                                   
                                  Best
                                   
                                  Kurt Radamaker
                                  Cave Creek, AZ
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                   

                                  
                                  Regards,
                                  Ed
                                  
                                  Ed Stonick
                                  Pasadena, CA
                                  edstonick@...
                                • John Sterling
                                  When I first started birding in 1971, Blue-gray Tanager was in the field guide because of its population in Florida which has since disappeared. Didn t the
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    When I first started birding in 1971, Blue-gray Tanager was in the field guide because of its population in Florida which has since disappeared.  Didn't the Black Francolin population die out shortly after the species was accepted on the ABA list for North America? 
                                    These two additional examples, along with those mentioned by Steve Hampton below,  illustrate the difficulty in determining whether introduced species should be viewed as fully established. 

                                    Maybe we should relax the criteria and accept many more exotic species on the list as I see no compelling reason not to in light of historical crashes of some "established" species.  Why not add the many parrots in CA to the state list along with Magpie Jay, Pin-tailed Whydah, Red Bishops and others?  Why go to the extra time and effort to demonstrate whether populations are "established" based upon criteria that are somewhat arbitrary.  Just accept them to the state list and let the army of eBirders and other birders document their population status?  If an exotic species is "extirpated", so what?  Just remove it from the list.

                                    If you are worried about fluctuations on your state, life, county etc lists, then just count native species on your list and keep a separate list for non-native species. Seems like a simple way to deal with this issue.

                                    John

                                    John Sterling
                                    VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

                                    26 Palm Ave
                                    Woodland, CA 95695
                                    530 908-3836
                                    jsterling@...
                                    www.sterlingbirds.com

                                    On Sep 5, 2013, at 12:10 PM, Steve Hampton <stevechampton@...> wrote:

                                     

                                    Good discussion about when to accept non-natives as established.  

                                    The removal of Ringed Turtle Dove from the ABA list, the crash of Crested Mynas, and the recent crash of Spotted Doves also causes one to pause, as these examples suggest that the population dynamics of some species, depending on their ecological context, follow much longer patterns of expansion and collapse than we might expect.  Thus, what appears to be "established" might just be circling the drain.  





                                    On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 11:36 AM, Douglas Aguillard <dwaguillard@...> wrote:
                                     

                                    Ali,
                                     
                                    I also have wondered the same. The Lilac-crowned population in San Diego seems to be a 2-1 larger than the Red-crowned. The Magpie Jays in the Tijuana River valley have been around for over 10 years, and the population does grow and move around the south County, but will probably never make the list.
                                     
                                    But with all things, the CBRC and ABA only have the power, when your willing to let them have it. So you can make up your own State list if you wish to.
                                     
                                    Doug Aguillard
                                    San Diego, CA
                                    On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 7:18 AM, Ali Sheehey <natureali@...> wrote:
                                     

                                    Birders.

                                    I continue to wonder about the bias against accepting non-migratory established exotics. When a well documented vagrant with a single occurrence is countable but psittacid populations that continue to experience exponential growth are not considered because of limited geographic distribution owing to their non migratory habits, I scratch my head.

                                    As the documenter of Bakersfield's Rose-ringed Parakeet population, it becomes apparent that even though this population has satisfied every criteria for inclusion, it remains off the California list.

                                    Other populations within the state of this species may not be stable owing to competition from other more robust psittacid species but the Bakersfield population does not have the same pressure.

                                    I wouldn't be comfortable including rose-rings on my list beyond Bakersfield but I would add Nanday Parakeet from Malibu or Lilac-crowned Parrot from Temple City. The establishment of these birds is highly localized but stable by all accounts.

                                    IMHO, if one is going to have any exotics on the list, then all that meet the criteria as established should be considered without bias.

                                    Respectfully yours in nature,

                                    Ali

                                    Alison Sheehey
                                    PO Box 153
                                    Weldon, CA 93283

                                    natureali@...
                                    www.facebook.com/NaturesAli
                                    www.natureali.org
                                    www.flickr.com/photos/natureali




                                    --
                                    Doug Aguillard
                                    Photojournalist
                                    San Diego, CA
                                     




                                    --
                                    Steve Hampton
                                    Davis, CA


                                  • Elias Elias
                                    Yes. It is a discussion which fascinates me. But at the risk of sounding xenophobic, I ll pipe up with a viewpoint that doesn t get a lot of air time. It my
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Yes. It is a discussion which fascinates me. But at the risk of sounding xenophobic, I'll pipe up with a viewpoint that doesn't get a lot of air time. It my opinion, we birders (at least those among us who leave a record of what we encounter) have an obligation to count, document and publicize _every_ species in our area of interest. Every correctly identified species that is alive or dead, free-flying or caged. Radical? yes! After all, the total number of species of birds in the universe is finite. Obligation is a strong sentiment but I believe it is justified by the need to monitor ecosystems for invaders. I understand that Florida has a potential problem on its hands with the introduction and establishment of the Burmese python. Only time with tell, how this will play out. Perhaps there has been or will be some addition to our avifauna that stands to irrevocably alter our ecosystems here. I argue that it is important to pay attention. Of course we have learned that it is more critical to pay attention on islands. But I feel we ought to be in the habit of doing the same on the continents as well. Because ecosystems are a lot like islands.

                                      This tenant of conservation biology has been known in limited circles for decades but there is no reason why it ought not become a mainstream household concept. And it goes hand-in-hand with circumscribing behaviors in the pet trade, zoological gardens and tourist traps. Just look what happened when we didn't pay attention to the brown tree snake on Guam. How many species have become extinct through this disastrous introduction? As somebody said: the biggest problem in the world could have been solved when it was small. I just wish that the state record committees and the ABA incentivized counting the one off escapes/releases. Now that we have eBird.org we have the mechanism to publicize. 

                                      Flock on!

                                      Elias/Ηλίας
                                      Arcata CA/San Diego CA
                                      Walkie talkie primero=707-633-8833
                                      Last ditch alternate=559-433-7254


                                      On Sep 5, 2013, at 12:11, Steve Hampton <stevechampton@...> wrote:



                                      Good discussion about when to accept non-natives as established.  

                                      The removal of Ringed Turtle Dove from the ABA list, the crash of Crested Mynas, and the recent crash of Spotted Doves also causes one to pause, as these examples suggest that the population dynamics of some species, depending on their ecological context, follow much longer patterns of expansion and collapse than we might expect.  Thus, what appears to be "established" might just be circling the drain.  





                                      On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 11:36 AM, Douglas Aguillard <dwaguillard@...> wrote:
                                       

                                      Ali,
                                       
                                      I also have wondered the same. The Lilac-crowned population in San Diego seems to be a 2-1 larger than the Red-crowned. The Magpie Jays in the Tijuana River valley have been around for over 10 years, and the population does grow and move around the south County, but will probably never make the list.
                                       
                                      But with all things, the CBRC and ABA only have the power, when your willing to let them have it. So you can make up your own State list if you wish to.
                                       
                                      Doug Aguillard
                                      San Diego, CA
                                      On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 7:18 AM, Ali Sheehey <natureali@...> wrote:
                                       

                                      Birders.

                                      I continue to wonder about the bias against accepting non-migratory established exotics. When a well documented vagrant with a single occurrence is countable but psittacid populations that continue to experience exponential growth are not considered because of limited geographic distribution owing to their non migratory habits, I scratch my head.

                                      As the documenter of Bakersfield's Rose-ringed Parakeet population, it becomes apparent that even though this population has satisfied every criteria for inclusion, it remains off the California list.

                                      Other populations within the state of this species may not be stable owing to competition from other more robust psittacid species but the Bakersfield population does not have the same pressure.

                                      I wouldn't be comfortable including rose-rings on my list beyond Bakersfield but I would add Nanday Parakeet from Malibu or Lilac-crowned Parrot from Temple City. The establishment of these birds is highly localized but stable by all accounts.

                                      IMHO, if one is going to have any exotics on the list, then all that meet the criteria as established should be considered without bias.

                                      Respectfully yours in nature,

                                      Ali

                                      Alison Sheehey
                                      PO Box 153
                                      Weldon, CA 93283

                                      natureali@...
                                      www.facebook.com/NaturesAli
                                      www.natureali.org
                                      www.flickr.com/photos/natureali




                                      --
                                      Doug Aguillard
                                      Photojournalist
                                      San Diego, CA
                                       




                                      --
                                      Steve Hampton
                                      Davis, CA


                                    • Rusty Scalf
                                      The population boom-bust nature of alien birds is intriguing, I think. To understand it might yield substantial insights into the field of avian ecology. A
                                      Message 18 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                                      • 0 Attachment

                                        The population boom-bust nature of alien birds is intriguing, I think.  To understand it might yield substantial insights into the field of avian ecology. 

                                        A while back Douglass Pratt wrote a fascinating post to HawaiiBirding on the subject of Estreldid Finches and their pattern of radiation in the islands. He noted that some of these had relatively stable but small and geographically limited populations that lasted for a good many years; sometimes not leaving the confines of a town or some limited area. Then they'd suddenly surge and go on a march, eventually island hopping. African Silverbill (Lonchura cantans) was one. He thinks the birds stay limited until enough adaptive mutations are collected to equip them to radiate; that they suddenly radiate once they become a slightly different bird.

                                           Rusty Scalf
                                            Berkeley


                                      • natureali
                                        It is not just exotics that experience population booms and busts. Carolina Parakeet and Passenger Pigeon are great examples of the impact that eradication
                                        Message 19 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                                        • 0 Attachment

                                          It is not just exotics that experience population booms and busts. Carolina Parakeet and Passenger Pigeon are great examples of the impact that eradication efforts can have on natives. The drive to harvest burned trees is impacting Black-backed Woodpeckers without any so called eradication process. Hunting and the removal of mature White Fir has caused sharp declines in Sooty Grouse populations in the southern Sierra Nevada.


                                          Yes, exotics may wax and wane, but the Rose-ringed Parakeets have been documented since the early 1980's when their population was in the dozens to hundreds. The population easily exceeds 3000 birds now and I suspect that is extremely conservative. Their distribution covers most of the 224 sq. mile metropolitan area of Bakersfield. The fifteen years as established was long ago satisfied.


                                          I hope to have the documentation prepared so that the bird record committee can review it in a non-biased fashion. The inclusion of this species doesn't just meet the criteria but is also a cornerstone species for nature based tourism outreach efforts in the San Joaquin Valley. (Bakersfield has many native species that qualify to use in nature tourism, but parakeets add panache when dealing with the lay public).


                                          Another consideration is, if a population suddenly increases or declines whether exotic or native, having a public cataloging method (thank goodness for ebird), allows for rapid review to see what factors may be causing that change. Does the success of the Eurasian Collared Dove have anything to do with the decline of the Spotted Dove or maybe when the feral cat programs starting exactly political pressure on urban ecosystems the Spotted Dove started its steep dive? Science is not limited to natural processes but also works on understanding the human impact on said processes.


                                          I ebird every single exotic bird, not because I want it on my list but because I want a record of pioneer populations so we don't have to speculate if a fire at a pet store was the simple cause of the sudden appearance of a new species. I also ebird domestic ducks and peacocks as ebird is not just the purview of birders but many different constituencies are looking at the data and it helps to know if a relatively native pond is now overwhelmed with mutt ducks because someone dumped their pets in the middle of the night.


                                          Respectfully,


                                          Ali Sheehey

                                          Weldon, CA



                                          --- In CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com, <calbirds@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                                          The population boom-bust nature of alien birds is intriguing, I think.  To understand it might yield substantial insights into the field of avian ecology. 

                                          A while back Douglass Pratt wrote a fascinating post to HawaiiBirding on the subject of Estreldid Finches and their pattern of radiation in the islands. He noted that some of these had relatively stable but small and geographically limited populations that lasted for a good many years; sometimes not leaving the confines of a town or some limited area. Then they'd suddenly surge and go on a march, eventually island hopping. African Silverbill (Lonchura cantans) was one. He thinks the birds stay limited until enough adaptive mutations are collected to equip them to radiate; that they suddenly radiate once they become a slightly different bird.

                                             Rusty Scalf
                                              Berkeley


                                        • Wanda
                                          Right on Kurt! It is all in the record keeping and research! Things don t happen by themselves or verbal complaints................. Wanda Dameron West San
                                          Message 20 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            Right on Kurt!    It is all in the record keeping and research!  

                                            Things don't happen by themselves or verbal complaints.................

                                            Wanda Dameron
                                            West San Fernando Valley


                                            On 9/5/2013 12:28 PM, Kurt Radamaker wrote:
                                             
                                            Hi Doug, Ali
                                             
                                            Before Rosy-faced Lovebird A.K.A Peach-faced Lovebird was officially accepted to the ABA list in 2012, as a member of the Arizona Bird Committee, I often had birders ask me why the Lovebird was not on the Arizona or ABA List. It was clear to AZ birders that Rosy-faced Lovebirds had been established for a long time and had a viable and expanding population in Phoenix. Birders around PHX would see them all the time, and they were hard to miss at popular birding locations like the Gilbert Water Ranch.
                                             
                                            The reason they were not on the AZ State or ABA list was simple. No one had done the research and work to consolidate Lovebird information and publish the results. So around 2008 I decided to research the Lovebird and publish my findings. The first step was to determine the population size and range, so I set up a Lovebird Census in 2009. 65 people participated and we found around 1000 lovebirds that day. Troy Corman and I researched the Lovebirds for the next year and published our results in the peer-reviewed Journal Arizona Birds Online http://www.azfo.org/journal/Rosy-facedLovebird2011.html
                                             
                                            After our research was published, we submitted our findings to the Arizona Bird Committee (ABC) for acceptance to the Arizona State List. On 28 December 2011, the Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted to the Arizona State List http://abc.azfo.org/news/default.html
                                             
                                            Once Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted by the ABC, I submitted a formal request to the ABA-CLC to review Rosy-faced Lovebird for acceptance to the ABA list. The submission and journal article were reviewed and Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted.
                                             
                                            I don't believe bird records committee have any negative bias toward exotics. It is just much harder (requires research, writing, and commitment) to determine whether an exotic species is established over a vagrant occurring in the state. To determine if an exotic is established may take years, the ABA-CLC requires at least 15 years.
                                             
                                            So, if you believe Rose-ringed Parakeets or Black-throated Magpie Jays meet the ABA-CLC criteria http://aba.org/checklist/exotics.html I encourage you to do a census, research, publish and submit your findings to the California Bird Records Committee. I'm sure the CBRC would welcome it. I know the Arizona Bird Committee would.
                                             
                                            Best
                                             
                                            Kurt Radamaker
                                            Cave Creek, AZ
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             
                                             

                                          • podoces
                                            Message 21 of 25 , Sep 5, 2013
                                            • 0 Attachment

                                               <It my opinion, we birders (at least those among us who leave a record of what we encounter) have an  <obligation to count, document and publicize _every_ species in our area of interest. Every correctly identified  <species that is alive or dead, free-flying or caged.


                                              So we should go to the zoo and count all those birds? What about pet stores? Do chickens at chicken farms count? Maybe WFO should organize field trips to the MVZ and Cal Academy and the San Diego, LA and San Bernardino County museums, so that we can all tick off the dead birds in the collections.


                                              Counting anything but wild birds, be they native or established exotics, is a bit over the top, I think most will agree.


                                              Matt Brady

                                              Baton Rouge, LA



                                              --- In calbirds@yahoogroups.com, <fabflockfinder@...> wrote:

                                              Yes. It is a discussion which fascinates me. But at the risk of sounding xenophobic, I'll pipe up with a viewpoint that doesn't get a lot of air time. It my opinion, we birders (at least those among us who leave a record of what we encounter) have an obligation to count, document and publicize _every_ species in our area of interest. Every correctly identified species that is alive or dead, free-flying or caged. Radical? yes! After all, the total number of species of birds in the universe is finite. Obligation is a strong sentiment but I believe it is justified by the need to monitor ecosystems for invaders. I understand that Florida has a potential problem on its hands with the introduction and establishment of the Burmese python. Only time with tell, how this will play out. Perhaps there has been or will be some addition to our avifauna that stands to irrevocably alter our ecosystems here. I argue that it is important to pay attention. Of course we have learned that it is more critical to pay attention on islands. But I feel we ought to be in the habit of doing the same on the continents as well. Because ecosystems are a lot like islands.

                                              This tenant of conservation biology has been known in limited circles for decades but there is no reason why it ought not become a mainstream household concept. And it goes hand-in-hand with circumscribing behaviors in the pet trade, zoological gardens and tourist traps. Just look what happened when we didn't pay attention to the brown tree snake on Guam. How many species have become extinct through this disastrous introduction? As somebody said: the biggest problem in the world could have been solved when it was small. I just wish that the state record committees and the ABA incentivized counting the one off escapes/releases. Now that we have eBird.org we have the mechanism to publicize. 

                                              Flock on!

                                              Elias/Ηλίας
                                              Arcata CA/San Diego CA
                                              Walkie talkie primero=707-633-8833
                                              Last ditch alternate=559-433-7254


                                              On Sep 5, 2013, at 12:11, Steve Hampton <stevechampton@...> wrote:



                                              Good discussion about when to accept non-natives as established.  

                                              The removal of Ringed Turtle Dove from the ABA list, the crash of Crested Mynas, and the recent crash of Spotted Doves also causes one to pause, as these examples suggest that the population dynamics of some species, depending on their ecological context, follow much longer patterns of expansion and collapse than we might expect.  Thus, what appears to be "established" might just be circling the drain.  





                                              On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 11:36 AM, Douglas Aguillard <dwaguillard@...> wrote:
                                               
                                              Ali,
                                               
                                              I also have wondered the same. The Lilac-crowned population in San Diego seems to be a 2-1 larger than the Red-crowned. The Magpie Jays in the Tijuana River valley have been around for over 10 years, and the population does grow and move around the south County, but will probably never make the list.
                                               
                                              But with all things, the CBRC and ABA only have the power, when your willing to let them have it. So you can make up your own State list if you wish to.
                                               
                                              Doug Aguillard
                                              San Diego, CA
                                              On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 7:18 AM, Ali Sheehey <natureali@...> wrote:
                                               

                                              Birders.

                                              I continue to wonder about the bias against accepting non-migratory established exotics. When a well documented vagrant with a single occurrence is countable but psittacid populations that continue to experience exponential growth are not considered because of limited geographic distribution owing to their non migratory habits, I scratch my head.

                                              As the documenter of Bakersfield's Rose-ringed Parakeet population, it becomes apparent that even though this population has satisfied every criteria for inclusion, it remains off the California list.

                                              Other populations within the state of this species may not be stable owing to competition from other more robust psittacid species but the Bakersfield population does not have the same pressure.

                                              I wouldn't be comfortable including rose-rings on my list beyond Bakersfield but I would add Nanday Parakeet from Malibu or Lilac-crowned Parrot from Temple City. The establishment of these birds is highly localized but stable by all accounts.

                                              IMHO, if one is going to have any exotics on the list, then all that meet the criteria as established should be considered without bias.

                                              Respectfully yours in nature,

                                              Ali

                                              Alison Sheehey
                                              PO Box 153
                                              Weldon, CA 93283

                                              natureali@...
                                              www.facebook.com/NaturesAli
                                              www.natureali.org
                                              www.flickr.com/photos/natureali




                                              --
                                              Doug Aguillard
                                              Photojournalist
                                              San Diego, CA
                                               



                                              --
                                              Steve Hampton
                                              Davis, CA


                                            • tgmiko@gmail.com
                                              Interesting. I have always assumed that some biology grad students would be thrilled to make these exotics as the subject of a Masters or PhD thesis. It could
                                              Message 22 of 25 , Sep 7, 2013
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                Interesting. I have always assumed that some biology grad students would be thrilled to make these exotics as the subject of a Masters or PhD thesis. It could be done within spitting distance of a dozen or so universities.
                                                This somewhat assumes that said grad student is also a hard-core birder (who, of course, will not fudge their data for selfish purposes a la the 1919 White Sox). Not necessarily: during my banding days I met biology grad students in various parts of the state to whom birds are research subjects interchangeable with lizards or fish.

                                                Thomas G. Miko
                                                Http://www.tgmiko.com
                                                Claremont 91711, LA County
                                                Mobile: 909.241.3300
                                                Home: 909.445.1456
                                                Other Mobile: 213.471.6001

                                                "The universe is expanding. This should help with the traffic."- Stephen Wright
                                                Connected by DROID on Verizon Wireless


                                                -----Original message-----
                                                From: Ed Stonick <edstonick@...>
                                                To:
                                                Kurt Radamaker <kurtrad@...>, "calbirds@yahoogroups.com" <calbirds@yahoogroups.com>
                                                Sent:
                                                Thu, Sep 5, 2013 19:59:36 GMT+00:00
                                                Subject:
                                                Re: [CALBIRDS] Re: News from the California Bird Records Committee

                                                 

                                                HI Kurt!

                                                That's a good and important idea--to have the science behind the establishment of a new species for the list.

                                                Just wondering if anyone's studied the Orange Bishop.  Seems that species has been around about as long as the Mannikin albeit in smaller numbers.

                                                Regards,
                                                Ed

                                                Ed Stonick
                                                Pasadena, CA

                                                -----Original Message-----
                                                From: Kurt Radamaker
                                                Sent: Sep 5, 2013 12:28 PM
                                                To: "calbirds@yahoogroups.com"
                                                Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Re: News from the California Bird Records Committee

                                                 

                                                Hi Doug, Ali
                                                 
                                                Before Rosy-faced Lovebird A.K.A Peach-faced Lovebird was officially accepted to the ABA list in 2012, as a member of the Arizona Bird Committee, I often had birders ask me why the Lovebird was not on the Arizona or ABA List. It was clear to AZ birders that Rosy-faced Lovebirds had been established for a long time and had a viable and expanding population in Phoenix. Birders around PHX would see them all the time, and they were hard to miss at popular birding locations like the Gilbert Water Ranch.
                                                 
                                                The reason they were not on the AZ State or ABA list was simple. No one had done the research and work to consolidate Lovebird information and publish the results. So around 2008 I decided to research the Lovebird and publish my findings. The first step was to determine the population size and range, so I set up a Lovebird Census in 2009. 65 people participated and we found around 1000 lovebirds that day. Troy Corman and I researched the Lovebirds for the next year and published our results in the peer-reviewed Journal Arizona Birds Online http://www.azfo.org/journal/Rosy-facedLovebird2011.html
                                                 
                                                After our research was published, we submitted our findings to the Arizona Bird Committee (ABC) for acceptance to the Arizona State List. On 28 December 2011, the Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted to the Arizona State List http://abc.azfo.org/news/default.html
                                                 
                                                Once Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted by the ABC, I submitted a formal request to the ABA-CLC to review Rosy-faced Lovebird for acceptance to the ABA list. The submission and journal article were reviewed and Rosy-faced Lovebird was accepted.
                                                 
                                                I don't believe bird records committee have any negative bias toward exotics. It is just much harder (requires research, writing, and commitment) to determine whether an exotic species is established over a vagrant occurring in the state. To determine if an exotic is established may take years, the ABA-CLC requires at least 15 years.
                                                 
                                                So, if you believe Rose-ringed Parakeets or Black-throated Magpie Jays meet the ABA-CLC criteria http://aba.org/checklist/exotics.html I encourage you to do a census, research, publish and submit your findings to the California Bird Records Committee. I'm sure the CBRC would welcome it. I know the Arizona Bird Committee would.
                                                 
                                                Best
                                                 
                                                Kurt Radamaker
                                                Cave Creek, AZ
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                 

                                                
                                                Regards,
                                                Ed
                                                
                                                Ed Stonick
                                                Pasadena, CA
                                                edstonick@...
                                              • Kimball Garrett
                                                Birders, The Western Field Ornithologists California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting on 17-18 January 2014 in Los Gatos. Below is a brief
                                                Message 23 of 25 , Jan 21, 2014
                                                • 0 Attachment
                                                  Birders,

                                                  The Western Field Ornithologists' California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting on 17-18 January 2014 in Los Gatos. Below is a brief summary of actions, compiled by Committee Chair Joseph Morlan, relating to committee membership, the state list, and the review list.

                                                  The CBRC web site http://www.californiabirds.org has been updated by webmaster Joseph Morlan to reflect these actions.

                                                  Brian Daniels, John Garrett and Jim Tietz were elected to three-year terms on the Committee. We welcome back Jim who has served previously and has continued to help with the on-line CBRC database. Brian and John will be serving their first terms on the Committee. Rotating off the committee are Kristie Nelson, Jim Pike and Scott Terrill. Joseph Morlan will continue as Chair, Dan Singer as vice-chair and Guy McCaskie as CBRC Secretary.

                                                  Among various by-law revisions was approval of a provision to change the northern offshore boundary with Oregon to the area where the nearest point of land is within 200 nautical miles of the California coast. The area south of 42°N latitude had been used in the past. This change will eliminate a small wedge of offshore waters that were previously considered part of our California waters, but apparently only a single accepted record (of a "Dark-rumped" Petrel) has occurred in that area.

                                                  The committee voted to create a new category (RI) for the California Condor to indicate reintroduction in progress. This species was formerly listed as extirpated (E). Also Nazca Booby was removed from the Supplemental List of species which are of uncertain natural occurrence (the rationale being that the Supplemental List is for species whose provenance is uncertain, whereas we know exactly
                                                  what happened with the ship-assisted Nazca Booby).

                                                  One species group ("frigatebird sp.") was added to the review list based on a vote at the 2013 meeting, while three species and one species pair were removed.

                                                  Removed were:
                                                  Hawaiian Petrel and Galapagos/Hawaiian Petrel (now regular offshore)
                                                  Neotropic Cormorant (increasing rapidly in the Imperial Valley, breeding).
                                                  Pine Warbler (regular winter visitor in coastal Southern California).

                                                  Records of these species beginning 1 January 2014 will not be reviewed by the Committee. However, we continue to urge those who observe these species (and all other rarities) in California to thoroughly document sightings and provide details to the appropriate North American Birds regional or sub-regional editors as well as through eBird.

                                                  Among many additional topics discussed was the desire for photo submissions to be in the form of separate JPEG's with the original metadata (exif) generated by digital cameras rather than (or in addition to) embedded in word processing documents. We continue to urge observers to provide written context with all photo submissions, including circumstances of the sighting, description of behaviors and vocalizations, and anything else not evident in photographs. A revised submission form was approved and is available on our web site.

                                                  Lastly the committee is seeking a volunteer who is familiar with programming in MS Access to help us with our database. We need help creating queries and macros, and updating tables. Please contact Joe
                                                  Morlan (jmorlan@...) if you think you can help.

                                                  We are grateful to H. T. Harvey and Associates for hosting the meeting and generously supplying the sandwiches and pizza that got us through many long discussions; many thanks to CBRC members Steve Rottenborn and Scott Terrill for arranging this. The CBRC thanks its outgoing members for their service, and all of the observers who have submitted documentation of records to the CBRC over the past year.

                                                  This news posted by the CBRC "press secretary":
                                                  Kimball L. Garrett
                                                  Ornithology Collections Manager
                                                  Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
                                                  900 Exposition Blvd.
                                                  Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
                                                  kgarrett@...
                                                  http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
                                                • Kimball Garrett
                                                  The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting at the Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo on 23-24 January. The following
                                                  Message 24 of 25 , Feb 9
                                                  • 0 Attachment

                                                    The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting at the Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo on 23-24 January. The following items resulting from that meeting will be of interest to California birders:

                                                     

                                                    Changes to the STATE LIST:

                                                     

                                                    Arctic Warbler (Phylloscopus borealis) is removed and replaced with Arctic/Kamchatka Leaf Warbler (Phylloscopus borealis/examinandus); at present it is uncertain which of these taxa has occurred in California. The species pair Arctic/Kamchatka Leaf Warbler is also added to the review list.

                                                     

                                                    Tundra Bean-Goose (Anser serrirostris) is added to the state list (and review list) following the acceptance of the bird at the Salton Sea, Imperial Co. 19 Oct 2013 (CBRC record #2013-181); the species pair Taiga/Tundra Bean-Goose (Anser fabalis/serrirostris) is removed from the state list.

                                                     

                                                    Changes to the REVIEW LIST:

                                                     

                                                    Taiga/Tundra Bean-Goose is moved from the main Review List to the supplemental list of reviewed “species groups and hybrid taxa” at the end of the Review List

                                                     

                                                    Frigatebird sp. is removed from the “species groups and hybrid taxa” supplemental review list and replaced with Magnificent/Great/Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens/minor/ariel)

                                                     

                                                    Blue-footed Booby and Yellow-green Vireo are removed from the Review List

                                                     

                                                    COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP:

                                                     

                                                    Voting members Jon Dunn, Peter Pyle and Steve Rottenborn rotated off the Committee

                                                     

                                                    Lauren Harter, Kristie Nelson, and Scott Terrill were elected to the Committee as voting members

                                                     

                                                    Joe Morlan was re-elected as CBRC Chair

                                                     

                                                    Dan Singer was re-elected as CBRC Vice-Chair

                                                     

                                                    Finally, and most importantly, Guy McCaskie retired as Secretary after serving in that role since 2001. 

                                                    Tom Benson was elected to replace Guy as Secretary; all documentation of CBRC review species should now go to Tom Benson at secretary@...

                                                     

                                                    These changes to the State List, Review List, and Committee membership have been made on the CBRC web site by webmaster Joe Morlan; see:

                                                    http://californiabirds.org/

                                                     

                                                    In particular, note the tribute to outgoing secretary Guy McCaskie at:

                                                    http://californiabirds.org/GuyMcCaskie015.html

                                                     

                                                    Kimball L. Garrett

                                                    [acting as CBRC spokesperson]

                                                    Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

                                                    900 Exposition Blvd.

                                                    Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

                                                    (213) 763-3368

                                                    kgarrett@...

                                                     

                                                     

                                                     

                                                  • Tristan McKee
                                                    Thanks to the CBRC for all their good work. I was a little disturbed to see Yellow-green Vireo removed from the review list, considering the findings of this
                                                    Message 25 of 25 , Feb 9
                                                    • 0 Attachment
                                                      Thanks to the CBRC for all their good work.

                                                      I was a little disturbed to see Yellow-green Vireo removed from the review list, considering the findings of this major multilocus vireo phylogeny:


                                                      Basically, East Mexican Yellow-greens are poorly differentiated from North American Red-eyeds, while west slope/southern birds are a different beast entirely. Based on current knowledge, if the AOU acts on this, we will not know if we are seeing things that are basically Red-eyed Vireos with yellow-green plumage or the genetically distinct Yellow-greens from the west slope and south. 

                                                      Thanks to Alvaro Jaramillo for bringing this paper to my attention a few months back.

                                                      Tristan McKee
                                                      Arcata, CA

                                                      On Mon, Feb 9, 2015 at 2:54 PM, Kimball Garrett kgarrett@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                                                       

                                                      The California Bird Records Committee held its annual meeting at the Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo on 23-24 January. The following items resulting from that meeting will be of interest to California birders:

                                                       

                                                      Changes to the STATE LIST:

                                                       

                                                      Arctic Warbler (Phylloscopus borealis) is removed and replaced with Arctic/Kamchatka Leaf Warbler (Phylloscopus borealis/examinandus); at present it is uncertain which of these taxa has occurred in California. The species pair Arctic/Kamchatka Leaf Warbler is also added to the review list.

                                                       

                                                      Tundra Bean-Goose (Anser serrirostris) is added to the state list (and review list) following the acceptance of the bird at the Salton Sea, Imperial Co. 19 Oct 2013 (CBRC record #2013-181); the species pair Taiga/Tundra Bean-Goose (Anser fabalis/serrirostris) is removed from the state list.

                                                       

                                                      Changes to the REVIEW LIST:

                                                       

                                                      Taiga/Tundra Bean-Goose is moved from the main Review List to the supplemental list of reviewed “species groups and hybrid taxa” at the end of the Review List

                                                       

                                                      Frigatebird sp. is removed from the “species groups and hybrid taxa” supplemental review list and replaced with Magnificent/Great/Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens/minor/ariel)

                                                       

                                                      Blue-footed Booby and Yellow-green Vireo are removed from the Review List

                                                       

                                                      COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP:

                                                       

                                                      Voting members Jon Dunn, Peter Pyle and Steve Rottenborn rotated off the Committee

                                                       

                                                      Lauren Harter, Kristie Nelson, and Scott Terrill were elected to the Committee as voting members

                                                       

                                                      Joe Morlan was re-elected as CBRC Chair

                                                       

                                                      Dan Singer was re-elected as CBRC Vice-Chair

                                                       

                                                      Finally, and most importantly, Guy McCaskie retired as Secretary after serving in that role since 2001. 

                                                      Tom Benson was elected to replace Guy as Secretary; all documentation of CBRC review species should now go to Tom Benson at secretary@...

                                                       

                                                      These changes to the State List, Review List, and Committee membership have been made on the CBRC web site by webmaster Joe Morlan; see:

                                                      http://californiabirds.org/

                                                       

                                                      In particular, note the tribute to outgoing secretary Guy McCaskie at:

                                                      http://californiabirds.org/GuyMcCaskie015.html

                                                       

                                                      Kimball L. Garrett

                                                      [acting as CBRC spokesperson]

                                                      Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

                                                      900 Exposition Blvd.

                                                      Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

                                                      (213) 763-3368

                                                      kgarrett@...

                                                       

                                                       

                                                       


                                                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.