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Follow up to Kings Co. falcon

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  • Steve Summers
    I d like to add a follow up on Ed s recent post about the Kings Co. falcon. One field mark that several references point to about one difference between the
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 26, 2007
      I'd like to add a follow up on Ed's recent post about the Kings Co. falcon.
      One field mark that several references point to about one difference between
      the Gyrfalcon and Saker is that the tail is more spotted on the Saker and
      barred on the Gyr. This can be seen in some of the photos Ed posted in the
      file section. The Kings Co. bird definitely had a barred tail and in the
      field I counted that the wingtip came just to the third pale bar up from the
      tail tip.

      To help make a more complete story and to show some of the photos Ed and I
      have been looking at I've posted a pdf file on CALBIRDS in the file section
      showing some similar plumaged Gyrs taken from the internet. When I saw the
      bird both in flight and on the ground it did look larger to me than a
      Peregrine. When the bird was perched on the post it did seem more smaller.
      As in my original post on this bird its flight style was definitely more
      Gyr-like.

      From what's been discussed by Ed and from what I see if this bird is judged
      a hybrid I think it will be mostly based on size. I'll have to leave that up
      to others much more knowledgeable than I in such matters.

      Ed and I have had a fun time communicating back and forth on this bird and I
      think we both are waiting for more knowledgeable folks to come forth with
      opinions. This has been a great learning experience for me and as with Ed
      I've learned a lot about falconers and their birds. They sure do like to
      hybridize them! I'm still hoping we'll hear from the falconers if such a
      bird like this has been lost in a time frame that would fit the age of this
      bird.

      Steve Summers
      Porterville
    • karl@kerster.com
      I am a falconer and have had in front of my face all of the pure-bred and all of the hybrid falcons you are referring to. From what I have seen in real life,
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 26, 2007
        I am a falconer and have had in front of my face all of the pure-bred and
        all of the hybrid falcons you are referring to. From what I have seen in
        real life, the picture is of a pure gyr. That is how they look! Just like
        that! I showed the picture to both the saker (Lucky) and the GyrXMerlin
        hybrid (Xy) that are in my yard and they agree that it is a pure wild gyr.

        Karl G Kerster

        Kerster's Falconry

        I'd like to add a follow up on Ed's recent post about the Kings Co. falcon.
        One field mark that several references point to about one difference between
        the Gyrfalcon and Saker is that the tail is more spotted on the Saker and
        barred on the Gyr. This can be seen in some of the photos Ed posted in the
        file section. The Kings Co. bird definitely had a barred tail and in the
        field I counted that the wingtip came just to the third pale bar up from the
        tail tip.

        To help make a more complete story and to show some of the photos Ed and I
        have been looking at I've posted a pdf file on CALBIRDS in the file section
        showing some similar plumaged Gyrs taken from the internet. When I saw the
        bird both in flight and on the ground it did look larger to me than a
        Peregrine. When the bird was perched on the post it did seem more smaller.
        As in my original post on this bird its flight style was definitely more
        Gyr-like.

        From what's been discussed by Ed and from what I see if this bird is judged
        a hybrid I think it will be mostly based on size. I'll have to leave that up
        to others much more knowledgeable than I in such matters.

        Ed and I have had a fun time communicating back and forth on this bird and I
        think we both are waiting for more knowledgeable folks to come forth with
        opinions. This has been a great learning experience for me and as with Ed
        I've learned a lot about falconers and their birds. They sure do like to
        hybridize them! I'm still hoping we'll hear from the falconers if such a
        bird like this has been lost in a time frame that would fit the age of this
        bird.

        Steve Summers
        Porterville





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