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Rare Birds of California

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  • Guy McCaskie
    It appears that some birders are not aware that the California Bird Records Committee s RARE BIRDS OF CALIFORNIA is now available - go to
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 12, 2007
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      It appears that some birders are not aware that the California Bird Records Committee's RARE BIRDS OF CALIFORNIA is now available - go to http://www.wfo-cbrc.org/ to order. This approximately 600 page hardbound book compiles every CBRC decision through 2003, with an appendix that treats noteworthy records through 2006, if full of maps, charts, sketches and photographs. The book should be of interest to most birders, particularly those in California.

      Guy McCaskie
      Secretary, CBRC
      PO Box 275
      Imperial Beach, CA 91933

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    • erpfromca@aol.com
      I just picked up my copy at the recent Western Field Ornithologist s meeting and I have to say, it was worth the long wait. It is impressive and much, much
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 13, 2007
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        I just picked up my copy at the recent Western Field Ornithologist's meeting
        and I have to say, it was worth the long wait. It is impressive and much,
        much more than just a compendium of the state's rare bird records. The
        excellent introductory chapters on trends and a concise history of CA birding are
        fascinating.

        This book serves as more than a 'bible' for folks interested in the details
        of status and distribution of rare birds. Though not intended as a
        'bird-finding' guide, it could be used as a critical resource for people who want to
        increase their chances nailing those 'target' birds. Want to know the best
        dates and location to find that next Red-necked Stint? This book will tell you.
        Planning a pelagic trip and want the best shot at finally adding Manx
        Shearwater? This will tell you when and where to book it. Trying to decide if that
        Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher will stick around another day? You can see the
        history including length of stay for each accepted record. Planning that family
        vacation to California and you want to know what 'hot spots' are closest to
        your hotel? An impressive Appendix lists many hundreds of locations by county
        and gives the number of rare bird records AND coordinates to help you locate
        the spot. (sorry, no hotel accommodations on Southeast Farallon Island).

        I don't have ANY personal financial interest in this book, just think that
        anyone who is interested in rare CA birds (even if they are not from CA) will
        want a copy.


        Ed Pandolfino
        Carmichael, CA





        ************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com


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      • Sue & Lowell Young
        So how do you get the book Ed? Lowell Young Mariposa, CA
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 14, 2007
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          So how do you get the book Ed?

          Lowell Young
          Mariposa, CA
        • erpfromca@aol.com
          ... Western Field Ornithologists has just reduced the price of Rare Birds of California. Originally selling for $70.95, you can now buy it for only $25! It
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 7, 2011
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            ---- Posted with approval of the List Owners -----

            Western Field Ornithologists has just reduced the price of Rare Birds of
            California. Originally selling for $70.95, you can now buy it for only $25!

            It can be purchased online by going to the WFO site:
            _http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/08rboc.php_
            (http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/08rboc.php) where you can also read reviews of the book by Paul Hess and
            David Fix.

            This remarkable publication not only documents the details of all
            occurrences of rare birds in the state, it also puts those records into geographic
            and temporal context. If you want to know the mostly likely place and time
            of year to find a Yellow-throated Vireo in California (coastal SoCal, 2nd
            half of May), its in this book. The records are complete through 2003 and
            details on all records from 2004 to the present are online at the WFO web site
            (_http://www.californiabirds.org/cbrc_book/update.pdf_
            (http://www.californiabirds.org/cbrc_book/update.pdf) ). Beyond its value as a reference
            source, it is packed with outstanding photographs and includes articles on
            historical trends, a review of birding in California from 1960 to 2007, info
            about how to document and report rare birds, and species accounts for all the
            species that ever spent time on the California Bird Records Committee
            review list.

            Not many copies left so take advantage of this now.


            Ed Pandolfino
            Carmichael, CA


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