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Re: [CALBIRDS] How widespread in CA is African Collared-Dove?

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  • dsuddjian@aol.com
    In a message dated 9/6/2007 11:57:21 PM Pacific Daylight Time, rfs_berkeley@yahoo.com writes: If they re that common on the San Mateo Coast, I wonder why this
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 7, 2007
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      In a message dated 9/6/2007 11:57:21 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
      rfs_berkeley@... writes:

      If they're that common on the San Mateo Coast, I wonder why this is not
      the case in Oakland and Berkeley. They're about, but nothing like what
      you describe.

      Maybe it is a matter of scale. In Santa Cruz County we are seeing the pattern
      of expanding nuclei that Al mentions in the cities of Santa Cruz and
      Watsonville, but while the species is becoming increasingly widespread here it remains
      patchy and much more sporadic in other parts of the county. There are still
      significant areas of likely habitat where one would have a hard time finding
      ECD on order.

      Interestingly, ECD was present in a nucleus area in western Santa Cruz for
      several years before the regional invasion hit central CA a few years ago. It
      remained quite local in that nucleus for years and only exhibited the strong
      expanding pattern within western Santa Cruz coincident with the species'
      broadscale arrival in central CA two to three years ago. But in Watsonville there
      apparently were no nuclei before the regional invasion reached SCZ, but the
      expanding nuclei pattern then developed there. My impression is that the local
      pattern of nuclear explosion (if you'll pardon me) is fueled by the ongoing
      broadscale influx.

      David Suddjian
      Capitola, CA



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    • Floyd Hayes
      I don t doubt that there are pale Eurasian Collared-Doves resembling African Collared-Doves, but I was familiar with both of these species from the Caribbean
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 7, 2007
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        I don't doubt that there are pale Eurasian
        Collared-Doves resembling African Collared-Doves, but
        I was familiar with both of these species from the
        Caribbean and I'm quite confident both are present in
        the Napa Valley. On 2 January I saw about five of each
        (the pale ones aren't rare), with the Eurasian
        Collared-Doves giving three-noted calls and the
        presumed African Collared-Doves giving two-noted
        calls. I just posted photos at:

        http://www.geocities.com/floyd_hayes/collared-doves.html

        Incidentally, in contrast with the North American
        mainland, Eurasian Collared-Doves are spreading very
        slowly in the Caribbean. Despite an initial release in
        the northern Bahamas (New Providence in 1974) it is
        still relatively rare in the central and southern
        Bahamas (my brother and I photographed San Salvador's
        2nd in 2004). Unknown to most people, the birds were
        definitely released (well documented) on Guadeloupe in
        1976 (Barre et al., Pitirre 9(2):2-4, 1996), from
        which they slowly spread northward, only recently
        arriving in the Virgin Islands (one record, a bird I
        photographed in 2003), and they also spread southward,
        arriving in Dominica in 1987 and Martinique in 1994. I
        don't think they have been recorded yet on any islands
        to the south of Martinique except Trinidad, far to the
        south, where I photographed one (origin unknown) in
        2000.

        Floyd Hayes
        Hidden Valley Lake, CA



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      • Kimball Garrett
        [Note: I m not the listowner, but it s my opinion that Streptopelia doves are part of the California avifauna, and therefore fair game for discussion on this
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 7, 2007
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          [Note: I'm not the listowner, but it's my opinion that Streptopelia
          doves are part of the California avifauna, and therefore fair game for
          discussion on this list serve; I agree that discussions of population
          genetics may not qualify, however.]

          Two quick points:

          (1) Floyd surely is seeing African Collared-Doves (= "Barbary" or
          "Ringed Turtle-" Doves), and I didn't mean to imply in my previous
          messages that pale variant ECDs were the only possible explanation for
          what he was seeing. Domestic African Collared-Doves (ACDs or RTDs)
          escape very frequently, and of course central Los Angeles used to have a
          population that was even "ABA Countable" in the 1960s and 1970s (and had
          been established by the 1940s or earlier). Various morphs of ACDs are
          still released at the sorts of celebrations and public events that
          require liberation of large numbers of totally discombobulated domestic
          birds, and individuals escape all the time.

          (2) Regarding the discussion of ECDs being largely absent from most
          large urban areas such as the main San Francisco Bay metropolis, I think
          this is partly a matter of habitat -- this species generally doesn't do
          well in heavily urban areas. ECDs are absent or rare (tiny, very
          localized populations) in most of the greater Los Angeles urban area as
          well. This species depends almost entirely on grain -- in agricultural
          areas, weedy rural areas, industrial areas with grain mills, railroad
          right-of-ways in grain-producing regions, etc. Just about its only
          option in highly urbanized areas is commercial bird seed at feeders, and
          apparently there aren't enough feeders to sustain ECD populations in
          most highly urbanized areas.

          I'd much rather be out looking at Arctic Warblers than blabbing on about
          feral doves....

          Kimball

          Kimball L. Garrett
          Ornithology Collections Manager
          Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
          900 Exposition Blvd.
          Los Angeles CA 90007
          (213) 763-3368
          (213) 746-2999 FAX
          kgarrett@...


          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf
          > Of Floyd Hayes
          > Sent: Friday, September 07, 2007 10:59 AM
          > To: Calbirds
          > Subject: [CALBIRDS] RE: How widespread in CA is African Collared-Dove?
          >
          > I don't doubt that there are pale Eurasian
          > Collared-Doves resembling African Collared-Doves, but
          > I was familiar with both of these species from the
          > Caribbean and I'm quite confident both are present in
          > the Napa Valley.
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