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Watch for marked "Terngate" terns

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  • Kimball Garrett
    Birders, With Terngate very much in the news recently (charges have now been filed against three operators of the barges in Long Beach harbor that had been
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 20 1:30 PM
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      Birders,



      With "Terngate" very much in the news recently (charges have now been
      filed against three operators of the barges in Long Beach harbor that
      had been used by nesting Caspian and Elegant Terns), I wanted to take
      this opportunity to remind you that there is a chance that the small
      number of terns that were raised and released by the International Bird
      Rescue Research Center in San Pedro last August could be re-sighted this
      year.



      Nine Elegant Terns were marked with two orange bands on the left leg
      (and a USGS metal band on the right leg) and released at Cabrillo Beach
      in San Pedro LA. They should be looked for anywhere where Elegant Terns
      are concentrating this spring and summer (e.g. Bolsa Chica).



      Fifteen Caspian Terns were marked with a black alpha-numeric band on the
      left leg (and a USGS metal band on the right leg). The alphanumeric code
      starts with a "C" or "Y" and is followed by two numerals. These birds
      were released at the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge on 19 August
      2006. They should be looked for anywhere where Caspian Terns are
      congregating, both at the Salton Sea (and elsewhere inland) and along
      the coast.



      [The released terns were also marked with patches of green dye, but due
      to fading and molt these markings should no longer be visible]



      If you see any of the marked terns described above, please contact me or
      Kathy Molina (kmolina AT nhm.org). There are a great many Elegant Terns
      with only USGS metal bands - we are not interested in those (but of
      course if you can read the band, submit the information to the banding
      lab). Also, many Caspian Terns have USGS bands and often a combination
      of color bands and/or yellow alphanumeric bands. We are not interested
      in those, but if you can read the USGS band number, record color band
      combinations, and/or read the yellow alphanumeric bands, report that
      information to the banding lab. [Most of these birds with the auxiliary
      color/alphanumeric bands were banded at the Columbia River in
      Washington/Oregon].



      Please feel free to cross-post to other appropriate list-serves.



      Thanks for your help,



      Kimball



      Kimball L. Garrett

      Ornithology Collections Manager

      Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

      900 Exposition Blvd.

      Los Angeles CA 90007

      (213) 763-3368

      (213) 746-2999 FAX

      kgarrett@...





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