Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

More E. Coli, er, Collared-Dove

Expand Messages
  • Andrew Howe
    Here are my 1.5 cents on the Eurasian-collared Dove situation (some of which runs counter to previous posts). 1-Certainly, in many areas of its range, the
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 3, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Here are my 1.5 cents on the Eurasian-collared Dove
      situation (some of which runs counter to previous
      posts).

      1-Certainly, in many areas of its range, the Spotted
      Dove had begun its decline LONG before
      Eurasian-collared Doves were ever widespread or even
      present (and therefore niche competitors). Indeed, in
      western Riverside there’s about a seven year period
      between my last observation of Spotted (the most
      common yard bird when I was growing up) and my first
      sighting of Eurasian-collared.

      2-Although this species is now well established in
      many locations across Southern California, it’s
      perhaps premature to view this invasion as a permanent
      thing. True, this species has proven to be a very
      successful invader throughout Europe (see below), but
      other non-native species that seemed to do quite well
      initially, eventually declined for one reason or
      another (although much more localized in its range,
      Spotted Dove would be an example). This species
      certainly does appear on the fast track toward being
      the “next House Sparrow,” but we may not know this for
      quite some time.

      3-Finally (and with tongue firmly planted in cheek),
      there is even a remote possibility that this species
      is naturally occurring to the ABA area. Tony White’s
      article in “Birding” (Collared Dove: The Next New
      North American Species?; 18.3; June 1986) charts the
      species’ natural drive west from India to Iceland,
      hypothesizing that a logical next step would be the
      colonization of the Bahamas with vagrants found in
      Florida or perhaps the Maritimes. The Bahamas link
      would be tenuous indeed, as there is a report of
      several birds escaping from a pet store. Furthermore,
      I’m sure that the AOU, ABA, and California records
      committees have considered this matter, so the
      question of naturally invading vs. introduced is
      really a non-issue.

      However, if you hear a collared dove speaking Hindi .
      . .

      Andrew Howe
      Riverside, CA
      howe395@...
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.