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Eurasian Collared Dove in California

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  • SiriusGuy@aol.com
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 2, 2007
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      <<Why is it that Eurasian Collared Doves go so completely under reported?
      We hear more instances of people seeing Orange Bishops than we do of Collared
      Doves and yet the latter is much less likely an escapee! Any thoughts?>>


      I suspect the perception by many would be that in the case of today's
      "exotic" bird, ECDU, these will prove to be tomorrow's "house sparrow." I recall
      that soon after I took up birding a few years ago, these were the first birds
      I identified in Florida, while eating dinner outside my arrival night there.
      Clearly there must be something about this species that makes it readily
      able to compete, in many different locations.

      Perhaps by now, the question would be which California counties has ECDU so
      far NOT been found? The question for tomorrow likely will be how well will
      Mourning Doves and Spotted Doves compete for similar ecological niches with this
      westerly-migrating cousin.

      Alan Birnbaum
      Fresno, CA






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • scre@aol.com
      The question for tomorrow likely will be how well will Mourning Doves and Spotted Doves compete for similar ecological niches with this westerly-migrating
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 2, 2007
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        "The question for tomorrow likely will be how well will
        Mourning Doves and Spotted Doves compete for similar ecological niches with
        this
        westerly-migrating cousin."

        Since Eurasian Collared Doves first escapped in the city of Ventura back in
        the early 90's I have watched them increase dramactically in the city. As
        their numbers increased I watched Spotted Dove numbers decrease. It seemed
        everytime E Collared Doves moved into a new part of the city, Spotted Doves
        dissappeared from that area. Spotted Doves use to be abundant in the city with counts
        in the 100's now we are lucky to record them on the local CBC while Collared
        Doves now occur in the 100's. To me it seemed that the decline of Spotted
        Doves was directly related to the increase in Collared Doves, though I am aware
        that LA county had similar declines of Spotted Doves at the same time (without
        Collared Doves) though I think this was thought to be caused by predation? As
        for Mourning Doves I think they occupy a different enough niche that declines
        will not be seen and I don't think declines have been seen in other places
        that Collared Doves occur.

        David Vander Pluym
        Santa Cruz


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Thomas Miko
        I d welcome others comments on this, but I have noticed that the Eurasian Collared Doves in the American Southwest are more rural or at best suburban, than
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 2, 2007
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          I'd welcome others' comments on this, but I have noticed that the Eurasian Collared Doves in the American Southwest are more rural or at best suburban, than the birds in Europe. From Budapest to Athens to Istambul, I am quite used to seeing them in large cities, while the birds here seem far more rural in their habits i.e. habitat choice. I wonder if this is a reflection of the original colonizing population that they come from (???).
          Do the ones from Texas to Florida reside in large cities i.e. urban environments, or are they more rural there, also?
          Tom

          >From: SiriusGuy@...
          >Date: 2007/02/02 Fri AM 11:33:36 CST
          >To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [CALBIRDS] Eurasian Collared Dove in California

          >
          ><<Why is it that Eurasian Collared Doves go so completely under reported?
          >We hear more instances of people seeing Orange Bishops than we do of Collared
          >Doves and yet the latter is much less likely an escapee! Any thoughts?>>
          >
          >
          >I suspect the perception by many would be that in the case of today's
          >"exotic" bird, ECDU, these will prove to be tomorrow's "house sparrow." I recall
          >that soon after I took up birding a few years ago, these were the first birds
          >I identified in Florida, while eating dinner outside my arrival night there.
          >Clearly there must be something about this species that makes it readily
          >able to compete, in many different locations.
          >
          >Perhaps by now, the question would be which California counties has ECDU so
          >far NOT been found? The question for tomorrow likely will be how well will
          >Mourning Doves and Spotted Doves compete for similar ecological niches with this
          > westerly-migrating cousin.
          >
          >Alan Birnbaum
          >Fresno, CA
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
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          Thomas Miko (Mikó Tamás)

          thomas.miko@...
          thomas_miko@...

          653 S. Indian Hill Blvd., #C
          Claremont, CA 91711
          U.S.A.
          34.109167 N, 117.718293 W

          home: (909) 445-1456
          cell: (626) 390-1935
          work: (323) 226-7855

          "Luck favors the backbone, not the wishbone."-Doyle Brunson
        • Lilith Mageborn
          Why are Orange Bishops more reported than EC Doves? My guess is that they are brighter and more exotic, thus lending themselves to being noticed more often,
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 2, 2007
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            Why are Orange Bishops more reported than EC Doves? My guess is that they
            are brighter and more exotic, thus lending themselves to being noticed
            more often, while the EC Doves, from a distance, bear a resemblance to
            Mourning Doves in general -- from a *distance.* Non-birders are more
            likely to notice the OBs, because doves are very common (and largely
            share that same greyish tan coloring) around SoCal to the point of, at
            times, being a nuisance when they fill trees with non-stop cooing and
            calling. (Believe me. I lived in a Garden Grove neighborhood for two
            years at one point, and there were large flocks of Mourning Doves and
            American Crows in the trees and on the ground. I'll take the crows *any*
            day over the doves.) Anyway, that's my guess.

            When I was in St. George, Utah, last July, I found several EC Doves, in
            keeping with Tom's comment below. St. George is expanding but far from
            being urban since the outskirts are rural (where I found the ECDs),
            followed by many miles of redrock desert and desert.

            Just my penny's worth.

            Sue Jorgenson
            Anaheim CA


            On Fri, 02 Feb 2007 15:44:46 -0600 (CST) Thomas Miko
            <thomas.miko@...> writes:
            > I'd welcome others' comments on this, but I have noticed that the
            > Eurasian Collared Doves in the American Southwest are more rural or
            > at best suburban, than the birds in Europe. From Budapest to Athens
            > to Istambul, I am quite used to seeing them in large cities, while
            > the birds here seem far more rural in their habits i.e. habitat
            > choice. I wonder if this is a reflection of the original colonizing
            > population that they come from (???).
            > Do the ones from Texas to Florida reside in large cities i.e. urban
            > environments, or are they more rural there, also?
            > Tom
            >
            > >From: SiriusGuy@...
            > >Date: 2007/02/02 Fri AM 11:33:36 CST
            > >To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
            > >Subject: [CALBIRDS] Eurasian Collared Dove in California
            >
            > >
            > ><<Why is it that Eurasian Collared Doves go so completely under
            > reported?
            > >We hear more instances of people seeing Orange Bishops than we do
            > of Collared
            > >Doves and yet the latter is much less likely an escapee! Any
            > thoughts?>>
            > >
            > >
            > >I suspect the perception by many would be that in the case of
            > today's
            > >"exotic" bird, ECDU, these will prove to be tomorrow's "house
            > sparrow." I recall
            > >that soon after I took up birding a few years ago, these were the
            > first birds
            > >I identified in Florida, while eating dinner outside my arrival
            > night there.
            > >Clearly there must be something about this species that makes it
            > readily
            > >able to compete, in many different locations.
            > >
            > >Perhaps by now, the question would be which California counties has
            > ECDU so
            > >far NOT been found? The question for tomorrow likely will be how
            > well will
            > >Mourning Doves and Spotted Doves compete for similar ecological
            > niches with this
            > > westerly-migrating cousin.
            > >
            > >Alan Birnbaum
            > >Fresno, CA
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >Unsubscribe: mailto:CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > >Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
            > >Listowners: mailto:CALBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            > >For vacation suspension of mail go to the website. Click on Edit My
            > Membership and set your mail option to No Email. Or, send a blank
            > email to these addresses:
            > >Turn off email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-nomail@yahoogroups.com
            > >Resume email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-normal@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            > >
            > >Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > Thomas Miko (Mikó Tamás)
            >
            > thomas.miko@...
            > thomas_miko@...
            >
            > 653 S. Indian Hill Blvd., #C
            > Claremont, CA 91711
            > U.S.A.
            > 34.109167 N, 117.718293 W
            >
            > home: (909) 445-1456
            > cell: (626) 390-1935
            > work: (323) 226-7855
            >
            > "Luck favors the backbone, not the wishbone."-Doyle Brunson
            >
            >
            > Unsubscribe: mailto:CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
            > Listowners: mailto:CALBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > For vacation suspension of mail go to the website. Click on Edit My
            > Membership and set your mail option to No Email. Or, send a blank
            > email to these addresses:
            > Turn off email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-nomail@yahoogroups.com
            > Resume email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-normal@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Hank Brodkin
            I wouldn t be surprised if they are in all of the central and southern counties and in Inyo. They have also spread into Arizona, Sonora and Chihuahua at least.
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 3, 2007
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              I wouldn't be surprised if they are in all of the central and southern
              counties and in Inyo.
              They have also spread into Arizona, Sonora and Chihuahua at least. In
              Arizona they seem to pop up in small towns - in the middle of the Sonora
              Desert miles from anywhere. I am sure if you checked (and maybe have)
              places like China Lake, Borrego Springs, Big Pine, etc. they would be there.


              Hank Brodkin
              Carr Canyon, Cochise County, AZ
              hbrodkin@...
              "Butterflies of Arizona - a Photographic Guide"
              http://members.cox.net/hbrodkin/
              ____________________________________________________________________________
              1a. Eurasian Collared Dove in California
              Posted by: "SiriusGuy@..." SiriusGuy@... siriusguy50
              Date: Fri Feb 2, 2007 9:35 am ((PST))


              <<Why is it that Eurasian Collared Doves go so completely under reported?
              We hear more instances of people seeing Orange Bishops than we do of
              Collared
              Doves and yet the latter is much less likely an escapee! Any thoughts?>>
            • CHISHOLM, Graham
              One good source of information on reported locations is www.eBird.org . You can do a search by species and location and it will
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 3, 2007
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                One good source of information on reported locations is www.eBird.org
                <http://www.ebird.org/> . You can do a search by species and location
                and it will generate a map. Here is the data available for Eurasian
                Collared Dove on eBird for California. It will generate a map if you
                hit the tab on the top right.



                http://ebird.org/go/GuideMe?source=changeLocation&speciesCodes=eucdov&re
                portType=species&bMonth=01&bYear=2003&eMonth=12&eYear=2007&parentState=U
                S-NY&getLocations=states&states=US-CA&countyState=US-NY&hotspotState=US-
                NY&bcrState=US-NY&continue.x=13&continue.y=3&continue=Continue



                Thanks. Graham





                Graham Chisholm
                Deputy State Director &
                Conservation Director
                Audubon California
                4225 Hollis Street
                Emeryville, California 94608
                Tel. 510-601-1866/w
                Tel. 510-301-9407/c
                Fax 510-601-1954





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Bill Miller
                Eurasian collared doves have also been reported as far north as Humboldt and Siskiyou counties. -- Bill Miller Marysville, CA 530-742-2682 [Non-text portions
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 3, 2007
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                  Eurasian collared doves have also been reported as far north as Humboldt and
                  Siskiyou counties.

                  --
                  Bill Miller
                  Marysville, CA
                  530-742-2682


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Nate Dias
                  Allow me to share some east coast perspective. ECD have been firmly established in coastal South Carolina for over a decade. Here, they favor the developed
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 5, 2007
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                    Allow me to share some east coast perspective.

                    ECD have been firmly established in coastal South
                    Carolina for over a decade. Here, they favor the
                    developed sea islands (in particular dry, scrubby
                    beachfront areas) over any other habitat type.

                    ECD are also well-established in our rural,
                    agricultural areas and in suburban areas around cities
                    and towns.

                    In certain coastal places like Sullivan's Island, SC -
                    ECD are the predominate Dove, having supplanted
                    Mourning Doves from that category. They seem to be in
                    the process of doing this in portions of adjacent
                    Mount Pleasant, SC (on the mainland).

                    Have no doubt that Eurasian Collared-Doves are in CA
                    to stay and that their presence will affect other bird
                    species, in particular other Doves.

                    I am a bit fearful of the long-term effect of ECD on
                    Inca Doves in (sub)urban areas in places like SE
                    Arizona.

                    However, the presence of ECD is not bad news for all
                    birds - for example the Cooper's Hawks that nest in my
                    neighborhood. They seem to welcome ECDs filling the
                    Passenger Pigeon's place on the menu.

                    Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC



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