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Re: Tropical Storm John & Salton Sea pelagics

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  • Mark Brown
    All: For a peek at what might be coming our way see: http://elibrary.unm.edu/sora/wb/v30n04/ Seabirds carried inland by tropical storm by Roy Jones in Western
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 3, 2006
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      All:

      For a peek at what might be coming our way see:
      http://elibrary.unm.edu/sora/wb/v30n04/
      Seabirds carried inland by tropical storm by Roy Jones in Western
      Birds v. 30 #4 (1999) I look forward to the day old Audubon Field
      Notes, American Birds, Field Notes, and North American Bird archives
      are available online. The Changing Season for American Birds March
      1977 by Kenn Kaufman is subtitled : An intimate look at Kathleen and
      other avian phenomena of autumn 1976. It covers Tropical Storm
      Kathleen (nee Hurricane Kathleen) which deposited storm petrels etc on
      the Salton Sea and Arizona. Also the Changing Season by Michael Patten
      entitled: "Nora, El Nino and vagrants from afar"; is edifying. (Field
      Notes v. 52 p.14-18) Here is some tropical storm history:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_California_tropical_storms The
      National Weather Service is calling for flash flood warnings, flood
      warnings and flood watches throughout the Southwest. Supposedly washed
      out roads after Kathleen hampered checking for storm tossed birds. So
      be careful while chasing. As for Mr. Miko's question I suggest reading
      the Changing Season article available here:
      http://www.americanbirding.org/pubs/nab/archives/index.html I think
      the rule of thumb is that correlating out of range birds to tropical
      events around here means birding near in time and geography to the
      hurricane/tropical storm/tropical depression (eye) center. Unless the
      storm starts heading up the coast near the islands of the Santa
      Barbara Channel any 5 star birds you see out there are not likely
      connected to T.S. John. But are probably related to the warm seas or
      other factors. The remnants of a tropical cyclone entered southern
      California on September 15, 1910 and brought up to 2 inches of rain
      in Santa Barbara County so anything is possible. I think that less is
      known about the ornithological effect of tropical events in California
      than these effects from storms originating from the Atlantic and Gulf
      of Mexico. So everyone keep your eyes open and cameras ready. I am
      looking for Black-vented Shearwater, Red-billed Tropicbird, and South
      Polar Skua all on the "next twenty" list in Birds of the Salton Sea.
      And Bulwer's Petrel which is on the hypothetical list of the same book.
      Regards,

      Mark Brown
      Santa Maria
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