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Re:re: Little Stint

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  • Mark Brown
    Dear Jim, Oscar & CALBIRDERS: Well I am sure this is the best photo Oscar could get under the circumstances. If I saw a bird that looked like this, I would be
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 20, 2006
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      Dear Jim, Oscar & CALBIRDERS:

      Well I am sure this is the best photo Oscar could get under the
      circumstances. If I saw a bird that looked like this, I would be too
      excited to take a picture in focus. If this is not a magazine cover
      picture I think we can still use it to detect field marks which might
      help with identification. There are 7 , (CRBC) or 8 (S. Mlodinow
      N.A.B. v. 58 #3) California Little Stint records, there are 9 accepted
      California Red-necked Stint records, (CRBC). Not that much of a
      statistical difference. Jim believes that it is too early for a
      Little Stint; that idea might arise for us California birders because
      adult Little Stints have been detected almost twice as often on the
      east coast as on the west coast. Along the Pacific coast seven fall
      migrant adults have been found from July 9-28. So this bird is in the
      sweet spot for adults.

      The four bird suspects this bird might be are Little Stint,
      Red-necked Stint, alternate plumaged Sanderling, and a bright juvenile
      Least Sandpiper. I have not seen any juvenile Least Sandpiper yet this
      `fall". They usually show up in the first week of August?? Although
      the bird in question does have a sharp looking bill like a Least and
      it is noticeably smaller than the Western Sandpiper in the one picture
      I do not think it is a Least. The bird is not a Sanderling because of
      its small size. Then most likely, it is one of the two stints. The
      bird appears on the back to have straight white lines, not a V, good
      for Little. Its bill looks sharp at the end, good for Little. The legs
      appear long, good for Little. The back does not look gray at all also
      good for Little and not Red-necked. I.e. the Little Stint inner wing
      coverts are light brown to dusky brown with rather broad buffy or
      rufous edges while red-necked are cold gray with dark shaft streaks.
      (Veit & Jonsson 1984 Am. Birds v 38 #5) I also am no expert having
      no official experience with either stint.


      As Oscar has reported, this bird is still being seen and I look
      forward to more pictures and descriptions especially about behavior
      and vocalizations.

      Mark Brown
      Santa Maria
    • Joseph Morlan
      There is also another adult Little Stint at the Iona Island Sewer Ponds near Vancouver which has been present for the last few days. It has been well
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 21, 2006
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        There is also another adult Little Stint at the Iona Island Sewer Ponds
        near Vancouver which has been present for the last few days. It has been
        well photographed.

        --
        Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA 94044 jmorlan (at) ccsf.edu
        Fall Birding Classes start Sept 6 http://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/
        California Bird Records Committee http://www.wfo-cbrc.org/cbrc/
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