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Tern Colony Disaster

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  • Ed Stonick
    Thought the following article would be of interest: Tern colony cleared from second barge in harbor Group says 107 more dead baby birds found; 8 alive. By
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 1, 2006
      Thought the following article would be of interest:



      Tern colony cleared from second barge in harbor

      Group says 107 more dead baby birds found; 8 alive.

      By David Rogers, Staff writer Pasadena Star-News 7/1/06



      LONG BEACH -- The last of a tern colony that lived on two offshore barges
      was discovered Friday to have been wiped out, and numerous more dead baby
      birds were found washed ashore, advocates said.



      "There are no more birds. They're gone. They're dead," said Dan Salas,
      president of Harbor Breeze Cruises, who has followed the colony's demise
      since Wednesday, when more than 250 dead baby terns were found washed up on
      beaches after one of the barges was towed away.



      But the remainder of the colony about 500 to 600 birds, Salas estimated was
      no longer there as of Friday morning. The original barge that had been towed
      away was returned, "absolutely clean" of any bird droppings, while the barge
      that remained was cleared of birds, he said. And the bodies of 107 more baby
      terns were found Friday, bringing the total since Wednesday to 413, said
      Rebecca Dmytryk of the International Bird Rescue Research Center in San
      Pedro.



      Salas, whose company picks up passengers near the Aquarium of the Pacific,
      said the birds were "an important part of the tour," and some of them had
      names. "We actually watched the birds since the day they hatched," he said.
      "The people really enjoyed the birds."



      Terns are delicate, whitish birds with black markings on their heads and
      grayish markings on the wings. They often are seen skimming along the water
      close to shore as they look for fish.



      Dmytryk said the dead birds were too young to have moved from their nests on
      their own, and the colony appears to have been forced from the barges.



      "We've racked our brains to figure out if we can pinpoint a natural cause
      for this. Nothing fits," she said.



      The Press-Telegram was unable to confirm the towing company and the owner or
      owners of the barges as of Friday night, and calls to California Department
      of Fish and Game officials were not returned. A department investigator



      said Thursday the investigation was proceeding, but declined to elaborate.



      "Right now, we need to interview the owner of the company of the barges and
      the tug, the tug captain and his crew," said Kent Smirl, the investigator.



      Coast Guard Lt. j.g. Erik Sumpter said two barges had been anchored near
      White Island, an oil-producing platform in Long Beach harbor.



      One of the barges was being towed by the tugboat Timothy Peters to Santa
      Barbara earlier this week for a fireworks show, when the Coast Guard sent
      the barge back because there wasn't a load line certificate on file for it,
      Coast Guard Lt. Rick Detar said.



      That investigation continued Friday, he said.



      Sumpter did not know the name of the company that owned the barges and had
      no other details.



      Salas said he first saw the colony in mid-May, and the barges about a couple
      of months before that.



      The colony was an unusual sight. "I've been in this harbor 25 years, and
      I've never seen this," he said.



      Seven terns were found alive by afternoon Friday, bringing the total since
      Wednesday to 23, Dmytryk said. And Salas said by cell phone that another one
      was found early Friday night.



      "We're pulling it out of the water right now," he said. "He's two to three
      weeks away from flying. ... He's paddling. He's going to make it."



      The Associated Press contributed to this report.

      David Rogers can be reached at (562) 499-1246 or
      david.rogers@....





      Regards,

      Ed



      Ed Stonick

      Pasadena, CA

      edstonick@... <mailto:stonicks@...>







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Luke Cole
      This seems like an excellent opportunity for criminal prosecution under state and federal endangered species laws. We need to put pressure on the local
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 2, 2006
        This seems like an excellent opportunity for criminal prosecution under state and federal endangered species laws. We need to put pressure on the local District Attorneys and U.S. Attorneys to have some prosecution -- outrageous!

        Luke

        Luke Cole
        San Francisco

        -----Original Message-----
        >From: Ed Stonick <edstonick@...>
        >Sent: Jul 1, 2006 6:48 PM
        >To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [CALBIRDS] Tern Colony Disaster
        >
        >Thought the following article would be of interest:
        >
        >
        >
        >Tern colony cleared from second barge in harbor
        >
        >Group says 107 more dead baby birds found; 8 alive.
        >
        >By David Rogers, Staff writer Pasadena Star-News 7/1/06
        >
        >
        >
        >LONG BEACH -- The last of a tern colony that lived on two offshore barges
        >was discovered Friday to have been wiped out, and numerous more dead baby
        >birds were found washed ashore, advocates said.
        >
        >
        >
        >"There are no more birds. They're gone. They're dead," said Dan Salas,
        >president of Harbor Breeze Cruises, who has followed the colony's demise
        >since Wednesday, when more than 250 dead baby terns were found washed up on
        >beaches after one of the barges was towed away.
        >
        >
        >
        >But the remainder of the colony about 500 to 600 birds, Salas estimated was
        >no longer there as of Friday morning. The original barge that had been towed
        >away was returned, "absolutely clean" of any bird droppings, while the barge
        >that remained was cleared of birds, he said. And the bodies of 107 more baby
        >terns were found Friday, bringing the total since Wednesday to 413, said
        >Rebecca Dmytryk of the International Bird Rescue Research Center in San
        >Pedro.
        >
        >
        >
        >Salas, whose company picks up passengers near the Aquarium of the Pacific,
        >said the birds were "an important part of the tour," and some of them had
        >names. "We actually watched the birds since the day they hatched," he said.
        >"The people really enjoyed the birds."
        >
        >
        >
        >Terns are delicate, whitish birds with black markings on their heads and
        >grayish markings on the wings. They often are seen skimming along the water
        >close to shore as they look for fish.
        >
        >
        >
        >Dmytryk said the dead birds were too young to have moved from their nests on
        >their own, and the colony appears to have been forced from the barges.
        >
        >
        >
        >"We've racked our brains to figure out if we can pinpoint a natural cause
        >for this. Nothing fits," she said.
        >
        >
        >
        >The Press-Telegram was unable to confirm the towing company and the owner or
        >owners of the barges as of Friday night, and calls to California Department
        >of Fish and Game officials were not returned. A department investigator
        >
        >
        >
        >said Thursday the investigation was proceeding, but declined to elaborate.
        >
        >
        >
        >"Right now, we need to interview the owner of the company of the barges and
        >the tug, the tug captain and his crew," said Kent Smirl, the investigator.
        >
        >
        >
        >Coast Guard Lt. j.g. Erik Sumpter said two barges had been anchored near
        >White Island, an oil-producing platform in Long Beach harbor.
        >
        >
        >
        >One of the barges was being towed by the tugboat Timothy Peters to Santa
        >Barbara earlier this week for a fireworks show, when the Coast Guard sent
        >the barge back because there wasn't a load line certificate on file for it,
        >Coast Guard Lt. Rick Detar said.
        >
        >
        >
        >That investigation continued Friday, he said.
        >
        >
        >
        >Sumpter did not know the name of the company that owned the barges and had
        >no other details.
        >
        >
        >
        >Salas said he first saw the colony in mid-May, and the barges about a couple
        >of months before that.
        >
        >
        >
        >The colony was an unusual sight. "I've been in this harbor 25 years, and
        >I've never seen this," he said.
        >
        >
        >
        >Seven terns were found alive by afternoon Friday, bringing the total since
        >Wednesday to 23, Dmytryk said. And Salas said by cell phone that another one
        >was found early Friday night.
        >
        >
        >
        >"We're pulling it out of the water right now," he said. "He's two to three
        >weeks away from flying. ... He's paddling. He's going to make it."
        >
        >
        >
        >The Associated Press contributed to this report.
        >
        >David Rogers can be reached at (562) 499-1246 or
        >david.rogers@....
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >Regards,
        >
        >Ed
        >
        >
        >
        >Ed Stonick
        >
        >Pasadena, CA
        >
        >edstonick@... <mailto:stonicks@...>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >Unsubscribe: mailto:CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
        >Listowners: mailto:CALBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >For vacation suspension of mail go to the website. Click on Edit My Membership and set your mail option to No Email. Or, send a blank email to these addresses:
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        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        Luke Cole

        Center on Race, Poverty & the Environment
        450 Geary Street, Suite 500
        San Francisco, CA 94102
        415-346-4179 + fax 415-346-8723

        Providing legal and technical assistance to the grassroots movement for environmental justice
      • Thomas Miko
        You mean like the slap on the wrist that guy who knowingly shot AC-9 (the California Condor) on Harris Ranch got??? Yeah right. Tom ... Thomas Miko (Mikó
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 2, 2006
          You mean like the slap on the wrist that guy who knowingly shot AC-9 (the California Condor) on Harris Ranch got???

          Yeah right.

          Tom

          >From: Luke Cole <luke@...>
          >Date: Sun Jul 02 10:54:52 CDT 2006
          >To: Ed Stonick <edstonick@...>, CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Tern Colony Disaster

          >This seems like an excellent opportunity for criminal prosecution under state and federal endangered species laws. We need to put pressure on the local District Attorneys and U.S. Attorneys to have some prosecution -- outrageous!
          >
          >Luke
          >
          >Luke Cole
          >San Francisco
          >
          >-----Original Message-----
          >>From: Ed Stonick <edstonick@...>
          >>Sent: Jul 1, 2006 6:48 PM
          >>To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
          >>Subject: [CALBIRDS] Tern Colony Disaster
          >>
          >>Thought the following article would be of interest:
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Tern colony cleared from second barge in harbor
          >>
          >>Group says 107 more dead baby birds found; 8 alive.
          >>
          >>By David Rogers, Staff writer Pasadena Star-News 7/1/06
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>LONG BEACH -- The last of a tern colony that lived on two offshore barges
          >>was discovered Friday to have been wiped out, and numerous more dead baby
          >>birds were found washed ashore, advocates said.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>"There are no more birds. They're gone. They're dead," said Dan Salas,
          >>president of Harbor Breeze Cruises, who has followed the colony's demise
          >>since Wednesday, when more than 250 dead baby terns were found washed up on
          >>beaches after one of the barges was towed away.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>But the remainder of the colony about 500 to 600 birds, Salas estimated was
          >>no longer there as of Friday morning. The original barge that had been towed
          >>away was returned, "absolutely clean" of any bird droppings, while the barge
          >>that remained was cleared of birds, he said. And the bodies of 107 more baby
          >>terns were found Friday, bringing the total since Wednesday to 413, said
          >>Rebecca Dmytryk of the International Bird Rescue Research Center in San
          >>Pedro.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Salas, whose company picks up passengers near the Aquarium of the Pacific,
          >>said the birds were "an important part of the tour," and some of them had
          >>names. "We actually watched the birds since the day they hatched," he said.
          >>"The people really enjoyed the birds."
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Terns are delicate, whitish birds with black markings on their heads and
          >>grayish markings on the wings. They often are seen skimming along the water
          >>close to shore as they look for fish.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Dmytryk said the dead birds were too young to have moved from their nests on
          >>their own, and the colony appears to have been forced from the barges.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>"We've racked our brains to figure out if we can pinpoint a natural cause
          >>for this. Nothing fits," she said.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>The Press-Telegram was unable to confirm the towing company and the owner or
          >>owners of the barges as of Friday night, and calls to California Department
          >>of Fish and Game officials were not returned. A department investigator
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>said Thursday the investigation was proceeding, but declined to elaborate.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>"Right now, we need to interview the owner of the company of the barges and
          >>the tug, the tug captain and his crew," said Kent Smirl, the investigator.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Coast Guard Lt. j.g. Erik Sumpter said two barges had been anchored near
          >>White Island, an oil-producing platform in Long Beach harbor.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>One of the barges was being towed by the tugboat Timothy Peters to Santa
          >>Barbara earlier this week for a fireworks show, when the Coast Guard sent
          >>the barge back because there wasn't a load line certificate on file for it,
          >>Coast Guard Lt. Rick Detar said.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>That investigation continued Friday, he said.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Sumpter did not know the name of the company that owned the barges and had
          >>no other details.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Salas said he first saw the colony in mid-May, and the barges about a couple
          >>of months before that.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>The colony was an unusual sight. "I've been in this harbor 25 years, and
          >>I've never seen this," he said.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Seven terns were found alive by afternoon Friday, bringing the total since
          >>Wednesday to 23, Dmytryk said. And Salas said by cell phone that another one
          >>was found early Friday night.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>"We're pulling it out of the water right now," he said. "He's two to three
          >>weeks away from flying. ... He's paddling. He's going to make it."
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>The Associated Press contributed to this report.
          >>
          >>David Rogers can be reached at (562) 499-1246 or
          >>david.rogers@....
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Regards,
          >>
          >>Ed
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Ed Stonick
          >>
          >>Pasadena, CA
          >>
          >>edstonick@... <mailto:stonicks@...>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>Unsubscribe: mailto:CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >>Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
          >>Listowners: mailto:CALBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com
          >>
          >>For vacation suspension of mail go to the website. Click on Edit My Membership and set your mail option to No Email. Or, send a blank email to these addresses:
          >>Turn off email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-nomail@yahoogroups.com
          >>Resume email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-normal@yahoogroups.com
          >>
          >>
          >>Yahoo! Groups Links
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          >Luke Cole
          >
          >Center on Race, Poverty & the Environment
          >450 Geary Street, Suite 500
          >San Francisco, CA 94102
          >415-346-4179 + fax 415-346-8723
          >
          >Providing legal and technical assistance to the grassroots movement for environmental justice
          >
          >
          >
          >Unsubscribe: mailto:CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
          >Listowners: mailto:CALBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >For vacation suspension of mail go to the website. Click on Edit My Membership and set your mail option to No Email. Or, send a blank email to these addresses:
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          >
          >
          >
          >


          Thomas Miko (Mikó Tamás)

          thomas.miko@...
          thomas_miko@...

          653 S. Indian Hill Blvd., #C
          Claremont, CA 91711
          U.S.A.
          34.109167 N, 117.718293 W

          home: (909) 445-1456
          cell: (626) 390-1935
          work: (323) 226-7855

          FRS radio channel 11 code 22

          http://www.angelfire.com/ca2/birdsofhungary
          "The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast."
          -Oscar Wilde
        • Ed Stonick
          Hi Luke and Tom! I think the perpetrator may indeed face criminal charges, even though the terns are not on the endangered list. The latest news is that the
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 2, 2006
            Hi Luke and Tom!

            I think the perpetrator may indeed face criminal charges, even though the
            terns are not on the endangered list. The latest news is that the owner
            deliberately hosed the nests and babies into the water so the barge could be
            towed to wherever it was going for a fireworks show.

            Regards,
            Ed
             
            Ed Stonick
            Pasadena, CA
            edstonick@...
             


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Thomas Miko [mailto:thomas.miko@...]
            Sent: Sunday, July 02, 2006 2:48 PM
            To: Luke Cole; Ed Stonick; CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: Re: [CALBIRDS] Tern Colony Disaster

            You mean like the slap on the wrist that guy who knowingly shot AC-9 (the
            California Condor) on Harris Ranch got???

            Yeah right.

            Tom

            >From: Luke Cole <luke@...>
            >Date: Sun Jul 02 10:54:52 CDT 2006
            >To: Ed Stonick <edstonick@...>, CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Tern Colony Disaster

            >This seems like an excellent opportunity for criminal prosecution under
            state and federal endangered species laws. We need to put pressure on the
            local District Attorneys and U.S. Attorneys to have some prosecution --
            outrageous!
            >
            >Luke
            >
            >Luke Cole
            >San Francisco
            >
            >-----Original Message-----
            >>From: Ed Stonick <edstonick@...>
            >>Sent: Jul 1, 2006 6:48 PM
            >>To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
            >>Subject: [CALBIRDS] Tern Colony Disaster
            >>
            >>Thought the following article would be of interest:
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Tern colony cleared from second barge in harbor
            >>
            >>Group says 107 more dead baby birds found; 8 alive.
            >>
            >>By David Rogers, Staff writer Pasadena Star-News 7/1/06
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>LONG BEACH -- The last of a tern colony that lived on two offshore barges
            >>was discovered Friday to have been wiped out, and numerous more dead baby
            >>birds were found washed ashore, advocates said.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>"There are no more birds. They're gone. They're dead," said Dan Salas,
            >>president of Harbor Breeze Cruises, who has followed the colony's demise
            >>since Wednesday, when more than 250 dead baby terns were found washed up
            on
            >>beaches after one of the barges was towed away.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>But the remainder of the colony about 500 to 600 birds, Salas estimated
            was
            >>no longer there as of Friday morning. The original barge that had been
            towed
            >>away was returned, "absolutely clean" of any bird droppings, while the
            barge
            >>that remained was cleared of birds, he said. And the bodies of 107 more
            baby
            >>terns were found Friday, bringing the total since Wednesday to 413, said
            >>Rebecca Dmytryk of the International Bird Rescue Research Center in San
            >>Pedro.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Salas, whose company picks up passengers near the Aquarium of the Pacific,
            >>said the birds were "an important part of the tour," and some of them had
            >>names. "We actually watched the birds since the day they hatched," he
            said.
            >>"The people really enjoyed the birds."
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Terns are delicate, whitish birds with black markings on their heads and
            >>grayish markings on the wings. They often are seen skimming along the
            water
            >>close to shore as they look for fish.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Dmytryk said the dead birds were too young to have moved from their nests
            on
            >>their own, and the colony appears to have been forced from the barges.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>"We've racked our brains to figure out if we can pinpoint a natural cause
            >>for this. Nothing fits," she said.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>The Press-Telegram was unable to confirm the towing company and the owner
            or
            >>owners of the barges as of Friday night, and calls to California
            Department
            >>of Fish and Game officials were not returned. A department investigator
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>said Thursday the investigation was proceeding, but declined to elaborate.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>"Right now, we need to interview the owner of the company of the barges
            and
            >>the tug, the tug captain and his crew," said Kent Smirl, the investigator.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Coast Guard Lt. j.g. Erik Sumpter said two barges had been anchored near
            >>White Island, an oil-producing platform in Long Beach harbor.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>One of the barges was being towed by the tugboat Timothy Peters to Santa
            >>Barbara earlier this week for a fireworks show, when the Coast Guard sent
            >>the barge back because there wasn't a load line certificate on file for
            it,
            >>Coast Guard Lt. Rick Detar said.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>That investigation continued Friday, he said.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Sumpter did not know the name of the company that owned the barges and had
            >>no other details.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Salas said he first saw the colony in mid-May, and the barges about a
            couple
            >>of months before that.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>The colony was an unusual sight. "I've been in this harbor 25 years, and
            >>I've never seen this," he said.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Seven terns were found alive by afternoon Friday, bringing the total since
            >>Wednesday to 23, Dmytryk said. And Salas said by cell phone that another
            one
            >>was found early Friday night.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>"We're pulling it out of the water right now," he said. "He's two to three
            >>weeks away from flying. ... He's paddling. He's going to make it."
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>The Associated Press contributed to this report.
            >>
            >>David Rogers can be reached at (562) 499-1246 or
            >>david.rogers@....
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Regards,
            >>
            >>Ed
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Ed Stonick
            >>
            >>Pasadena, CA
            >>
            >>edstonick@... <mailto:stonicks@...>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>Unsubscribe: mailto:CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >>Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
            >>Listowners: mailto:CALBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com
            >>
            >>For vacation suspension of mail go to the website. Click on Edit My
            Membership and set your mail option to No Email. Or, send a blank email to
            these addresses:
            >>Turn off email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-nomail@yahoogroups.com
            >>Resume email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-normal@yahoogroups.com
            >>
            >>
            >>Yahoo! Groups Links
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            >Luke Cole
            >
            >Center on Race, Poverty & the Environment
            >450 Geary Street, Suite 500
            >San Francisco, CA 94102
            >415-346-4179 + fax 415-346-8723
            >
            >Providing legal and technical assistance to the grassroots movement for
            environmental justice
            >
            >
            >
            >Unsubscribe: mailto:CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
            >Listowners: mailto:CALBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com
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            >For vacation suspension of mail go to the website. Click on Edit My
            Membership and set your mail option to No Email. Or, send a blank email to
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            >
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            >
            >
            >
            >


            Thomas Miko (Mikó Tamás)

            thomas.miko@...
            thomas_miko@...

            653 S. Indian Hill Blvd., #C
            Claremont, CA 91711
            U.S.A.
            34.109167 N, 117.718293 W

            home: (909) 445-1456
            cell: (626) 390-1935
            work: (323) 226-7855

            FRS radio channel 11 code 22

            http://www.angelfire.com/ca2/birdsofhungary
            "The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast."
            -Oscar Wilde
          • Thomas Myers
            Does anyone know what species of tern these were? Thomas Myers San Diego ... Do you Yahoo!? Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail Beta. [Non-text
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 2, 2006
              Does anyone know what species of tern these were?

              Thomas Myers
              San Diego


              ---------------------------------
              Do you Yahoo!?
              Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail Beta.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Kimball Garrett
              Birders, There is, evidently, a full-blown investigation of the Long Beach Harbor tern colony disaster in the works. But this merely points out that wildlife
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 3, 2006
                Birders,

                There is, evidently, a full-blown investigation of the Long Beach Harbor
                tern colony disaster in the works. But this merely points out that
                wildlife agencies seem impotent to do anything to prevent such disasters
                (they can only attempt to react after disasters have happened). This is
                due mainly to two things:
                (1) California Fish and Game and U. S. Fish and Wildlife have
                been hit by staff and budget cutbacks (and, they will argue, by court
                challenges to their work) for so long that they can do very little in
                the way of habitat and wildlife protection. We're partly at fault
                because "we" keep electing anti-environment budget-axing politicians who
                could care less about wildlife. Fortunately, most politicians have to
                publicly appear to be opposed to the murder of cute, fuzzy baby terns,
                so maybe some pressure right now could result in some short-term gains.
                (2) The average American is absolutely 100% unaware of the
                Migratory Bird Treaty Act that protects our native bird species (and
                their parts, eggs, nests, etc.) from "take". I deal with the public all
                the time about such matters and it is astounding what people don't know.
                This means that agencies (and all of us) need to take a proactive,
                protective stance when sensitive wildlife issues arise. I don't know
                the details of the Long Beach case, but I find it fully believable that
                the barge caretakers had no clue that the terns "infesting" their barges
                had any legal protection. That's no excuse for violating the law, of
                course, but only a sea-change in thinking (i.e. operating on the
                assumption that all birds are protected from harm) will prevent future
                such occurrences. It is sad, but undoubtedly a consequence of (1)
                above, that the agencies knew about this colony and couldn't protect it,
                and allowed a second barge's nesting effort to be destroyed even as the
                issue was in the public spotlight after the first barge was ransacked.

                One other part to my tirade... Elegant and Caspian Terns nested nearly
                every year since the late 1990s in large numbers (along with small
                numbers of Royal Terns and Black Skimmers) on the fill area at Pier 400
                in Los Angeles Harbor, just a few miles from the Long Beach nesting
                site. Port construction proceeded (as planned) to the point that only a
                much smaller area of Pier 400 was available to colonial waterbirds.
                Because Least Terns are listed as Endangered and the other species are
                not so listed, the decision was made this year to allow ONLY Least Terns
                to nest in the area. Hence, we saw the movement of the Elegants and
                Caspians to what turns out to have been a disastrous alternative site.
                Once again, we are incapable of managing for a diversity of native
                species, proceeding instead with the tunnel-vision of protecting only
                "listed" species. It seems perfectly reasonable that port expansion
                planning could have accommodating several (not just one) tern species,
                but that didn't happen.

                Extensive efforts are being made to raise and ultimately release the few
                dozen young terns recovered alive. This is laudable, but a cursory
                knowledge of tern biology (with juveniles being fed by adults for weeks
                or even months post-fledging, and the specialized foraging techniques
                requiring much parental tutelage) suggests that the efforts are likely
                to have little success. All released birds will be banded, so this will
                be a good opportunity to monitor the efficacy of such rehabilitation
                efforts.

                Here's hoping that birders, wildlife agencies, and those who use the
                harbor areas of Long Beach and Los Angeles can find a way to protect
                these terns in the future.

                KLG

                Kimball L. Garrett
                Ornithology Collections Manager
                Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
                900 Exposition Blvd.
                Los Angeles CA 90007
                (213) 763-3368
                (213) 746-2999 FAX
                kgarrett@...

                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf
                > Of Luke Cole
                > Sent: Sunday, July 02, 2006 8:55 AM
                > To: Ed Stonick; CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Tern Colony Disaster
                >
                > This seems like an excellent opportunity for criminal prosecution
                under
                > state and federal endangered species laws. We need to put pressure on
                the
                > local District Attorneys and U.S. Attorneys to have some prosecution
                --
                > outrageous!
                >
                > Luke
              • Lidia Seebeck
                *Putting down my binocs for a moment to put on my political hat* If there is one thing I have learned in my six years of being politically active, is that most
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 3, 2006
                  *Putting down my binocs for a moment to put on my political hat*



                  If there is one thing I have learned in my six years of being politically
                  active, is that most incumbent politicians are deathly scared of their
                  little fiefdom being upset by some issue or force, either from within their
                  Party or otherwise, causing a defeat. All the recent attempts at
                  gerrymandering point to this phenomenon. If birders want to remedy this
                  situation, letters to those officials up for re-election this year could
                  work wonders. If officials seem insensitive, then publicizing their
                  responses could provoke some outrage and create some results.



                  It's probably wise to look at the issue as one of responsibility rather than
                  focusing on the birds. If the letters are perceived as being from a fringe
                  of animal welfare types, they may not get as much response as if the letters
                  point to the barge owner's responsibility in knowing laws that affect his
                  boat operation such as the MBTA. For that matter, if people actually
                  perceived one of their responsibilities as being to protect ecological
                  diversity, this would be a different society!



                  Lidia Seebeck

                  Pachappa Hill, Riverside CA



                  _____

                  From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  Of Kimball Garrett
                  Sent: Monday, July 03, 2006 1:39 PM
                  To: Luke Cole; Ed Stonick; CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [CALBIRDS] Tern Colony Disaster



                  Birders,

                  There is, evidently, a full-blown investigation of the Long Beach Harbor
                  tern colony disaster in the works. But this merely points out that
                  wildlife agencies seem impotent to do anything to prevent such disasters
                  (they can only attempt to react after disasters have happened). This is
                  due mainly to two things:
                  (1) California Fish and Game and U. S. Fish and Wildlife have
                  been hit by staff and budget cutbacks (and, they will argue, by court
                  challenges to their work) for so long that they can do very little in
                  the way of habitat and wildlife protection. We're partly at fault
                  because "we" keep electing anti-environment budget-axing politicians who
                  could care less about wildlife. Fortunately, most politicians have to
                  publicly appear to be opposed to the murder of cute, fuzzy baby terns,
                  so maybe some pressure right now could result in some short-term gains.
                  (2) The average American is absolutely 100% unaware of the
                  Migratory Bird Treaty Act that protects our native bird species (and
                  their parts, eggs, nests, etc.) from "take". I deal with the public all
                  the time about such matters and it is astounding what people don't know.
                  This means that agencies (and all of us) need to take a proactive,
                  protective stance when sensitive wildlife issues arise. I don't know
                  the details of the Long Beach case, but I find it fully believable that
                  the barge caretakers had no clue that the terns "infesting" their barges
                  had any legal protection. That's no excuse for violating the law, of
                  course, but only a sea-change in thinking (i.e. operating on the
                  assumption that all birds are protected from harm) will prevent future
                  such occurrences. It is sad, but undoubtedly a consequence of (1)
                  above, that the agencies knew about this colony and couldn't protect it,
                  and allowed a second barge's nesting effort to be destroyed even as the
                  issue was in the public spotlight after the first barge was ransacked.

                  One other part to my tirade... Elegant and Caspian Terns nested nearly
                  every year since the late 1990s in large numbers (along with small
                  numbers of Royal Terns and Black Skimmers) on the fill area at Pier 400
                  in Los Angeles Harbor, just a few miles from the Long Beach nesting
                  site. Port construction proceeded (as planned) to the point that only a
                  much smaller area of Pier 400 was available to colonial waterbirds.
                  Because Least Terns are listed as Endangered and the other species are
                  not so listed, the decision was made this year to allow ONLY Least Terns
                  to nest in the area. Hence, we saw the movement of the Elegants and
                  Caspians to what turns out to have been a disastrous alternative site.
                  Once again, we are incapable of managing for a diversity of native
                  species, proceeding instead with the tunnel-vision of protecting only
                  "listed" species. It seems perfectly reasonable that port expansion
                  planning could have accommodating several (not just one) tern species,
                  but that didn't happen.

                  Extensive efforts are being made to raise and ultimately release the few
                  dozen young terns recovered alive. This is laudable, but a cursory
                  knowledge of tern biology (with juveniles being fed by adults for weeks
                  or even months post-fledging, and the specialized foraging techniques
                  requiring much parental tutelage) suggests that the efforts are likely
                  to have little success. All released birds will be banded, so this will
                  be a good opportunity to monitor the efficacy of such rehabilitation
                  efforts.

                  Here's hoping that birders, wildlife agencies, and those who use the
                  harbor areas of Long Beach and Los Angeles can find a way to protect
                  these terns in the future.

                  KLG

                  Kimball L. Garrett
                  Ornithology Collections Manager
                  Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
                  900 Exposition Blvd.
                  Los Angeles CA 90007
                  (213) 763-3368
                  (213) 746-2999 FAX
                  kgarrett@nhm. <mailto:kgarrett%40nhm.org> org

                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroup <mailto:CALBIRDS%40yahoogroups.com> s.com
                  [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroup <mailto:CALBIRDS%40yahoogroups.com> s.com] On
                  Behalf
                  > Of Luke Cole
                  > Sent: Sunday, July 02, 2006 8:55 AM
                  > To: Ed Stonick; CALBIRDS@yahoogroup <mailto:CALBIRDS%40yahoogroups.com>
                  s.com
                  > Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Tern Colony Disaster
                  >
                  > This seems like an excellent opportunity for criminal prosecution
                  under
                  > state and federal endangered species laws. We need to put pressure on
                  the
                  > local District Attorneys and U.S. Attorneys to have some prosecution
                  --
                  > outrageous!
                  >
                  > Luke





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