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Re: [CALBIRDS] Yellow-billed Magpies & West Nile Virus

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  • Gary Zamzow
    ... Hi Jim, Here is an article from the Sacramento Bee. The Davis Enterprise had an article today about the Yellow-billed Magpies, but it has not been posted
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 31, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      On Aug 31, 2005, at 8:14 PM, Jim Greaves wrote:

      > "dying by the hundreds"? Where are the data? Drops in bird numbers on
      > local scales are normal in fall. It borders on hyperventilation to
      > assume WNV is the cause when there could be other factors such as
      > production in acorns to changes in vegetation to weather that could
      > cause, either singly or in combination, local out-migrations of birds
      > from areas where they "normally" abound. - Jim Greaves, Santa Barbara
      >
      >


      Hi Jim,
      Here is an article from the Sacramento Bee.
      The Davis Enterprise had an article today about the Yellow-billed
      Magpies, but
      it has not been posted on their web-site yet. I'll post it when they
      post it.
      Take care.
      Gary Zamzow
      Davis, CA



      http://www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/13405270p-14246595c.html
      W. Nile's toll on birds is soaring

      The yellow-billed magpie could disappear as virus spreads in north
      state.

      By Deb Kollars -- Bee Staff Writer
      Published 2:15 am PDT Saturday, August 13, 2005
      Story appeared on Page A1 of The Bee
      Get weekday updates of Sacramento Bee headlines and breaking news. Sign
      up here.
      As West Nile virus has moved into Sacramento County with a vengeance,
      it has killed thousands of birds and left wildlife experts worried
      about the survival of one of Northern California's more striking and
      clever birds: the yellow-billed magpie.

      Sacramento County has not only the highest number of confirmed human
      cases of West Nile in the state, but also far and away the highest
      number of birds that have died from the disease.

      According to figures released Friday by the state Department of
      Health Services, the number of reported dead birds in Sacramento County
      was 12,198 so far in 2005, representing 17.6 percent of the total
      69,203 dead bird reports for the state's 58 counties.

      Although not all the birds have been tested - state scientists stop
      testing once they've established West Nile has invaded an area - the
      state's top West Nile experts said there is no question the high dead
      bird counts stem from the disease.

      The actual numbers could easily be 10 times as high as those reported
      because many people do not report dead birds, said Stan Husted,
      supervising public health biologist for the state Department of Health
      Services.

      "It's all happening very fast," Husted said.

      Sacramento County's tally of confirmed human cases of West Nile
      remained at 36. Statewide that number rose from the 118 reported
      Tuesday to 174 Friday, with four people reported dead this year from
      the disease.

      The emerging concerns about birds came as mosquito control experts
      prepared for a second night of aerial spraying in southern Sacramento
      County. They also announced that infected mosquito counts were rising
      in Yolo County and may require insecticide treatments in populated
      areas in future days - most likely with ground rigs on city streets.

      "I don't think we're going to have to do aerial applications over the
      cities of Davis and Woodland," said Dave Brown, manager of the
      Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control District. "We believe we
      can handle them with ground-based units."

      The district is doing the treatments to stop the spread of West Nile,
      which is passed by infected mosquitoes.

      As the new numbers rolled out late Friday afternoon, officials of the
      mosquito control district were keeping an eye on the weather. Plans to
      spray 66,000 acres south of the American River were thwarted on Friday
      night. Planes were grounded after Delta winds picked up.

      Sacramento County is not the only hot spot.

      This summer, the mosquito control district has been using ground rigs
      to control mosquitoes in cemeteries and parks in various Yolo County
      locations, as well as the fairgrounds in Woodland. Agricultural areas
      of Yolo County have been receiving regular aerial sprayings, as they do
      every year, Brown said.

      As of Friday morning, the district had spent about $400,000 on plane
      and materials costs for four nights of spraying. The district has about
      $1 million in reserves to cover all spraying costs.

      Brown said traps in the northern areas of Sacramento County showed kill
      rates of between 40 percent and 80 percent, depending on the location,
      after three nights of aerial spraying.

      For many people, their first and only encounter with West Nile comes
      when they stumble upon a bird that has succumbed to the aggressive
      disease.

      A dead jay in a flower bed. A dead crow on the bike trail. A dead
      magpie lying in the street.

      The images have been haunting Sacramentans, and have provided a
      sobering record of the rapid spread of West Nile.

      Bobbi Larsen, a retiree living near Fair Oaks Boulevard and San Juan
      Avenue, is among many who have discovered birds wobbling on the ground,
      or already dead.

      "In one week's time, we've had 13 dead magpies on a tiny little section
      of our street," Larsen said. "I had a scrub jay who came every day at
      lunchtime and squawked for joy in the birdbath. Now he's gone."

      Dawn Austin, a painting contractor who lives near Orangevale, said she
      buried one bird after another this week under an oak tree on her small
      acreage. Most were jays and magpies.

      "I used to fill my bird feeder every day," Austin said. "Now, it's
      every four days or so."

      Many have mistakenly concluded the birds are dying from the aerial
      spraying.

      "It's not the spray. It's the virus," said Vicki Kramer, chief of the
      state health department's Vector Borne Disease Program.

      Birds play a critical role in the spread of West Nile virus. Birds are
      a favorite target of mosquitoes. When bitten by infected mosquitoes,
      birds can become "reservoirs" for the virus, passing it along to
      uninfected mosquitoes that bite them. Mosquitoes, in turn, infect
      people, horses and other animals; bird-to-human transmissions do not
      occur.

      Some species of birds are more vulnerable than others. The "corvid"
      family - which includes crows, jays, magpies and ravens - is
      particularly susceptible. Nearly 100 percent of infected crows die,
      usually in about five days, with the other corvid types not far behind,
      Husted said.

      Wildlife experts are especially worried about the yellow-billed magpie,
      said Dr. Holly Ernest, a wildlife veterinarian who directs the Wildlife
      Genetics Lab at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

      One clue the bird is in danger is that the black-billed magpie, which
      lives throughout western North America (except in areas populated by
      the yellow-billed) has been hit hard by West Nile.

      The yellow-billed magpie is not listed as a threatened species. But
      because it is endemic to California, meaning it lives nowhere else, a
      large kill-off could place the bird at risk of survival, Ernest said.
      She is involved in several research projects to monitor the disease's
      impact on the local magpie, including counts being conducted by
      volunteers from Davis as they ride their bicycles.

      A wide range of other birds such as finches, robins, quail, mourning
      doves and certain parakeets also can become infected with West Nile.
      They survive or die at varying rates, depending on the type of bird,
      said Nicholas Komar, research biologist for the Centers for Disease
      Control and Prevention in Fort Collins, Colo.

      Birds remain infectious for several days. Those that become infected
      but survive become immune for life and can pass that immunity to their
      offspring, Komar said. Eventually, the disease will run its course, he
      added, but based on other areas of the country, it could take several
      years. In New York, bird deaths have been a regular summer ritual since
      West Nile first hit in 1999.

      The disease attacks most of the major organs and neurological systems,
      leaving birds staggering and unable to move in the final stages.
      Gauging pain levels in birds is difficult, but researchers said birds
      with West Nile almost certainly suffer. The only way to stop birds from
      becoming infected is to reduce infected mosquito populations, Husted
      said.

      The dead bird reports were a major clue to local officials that the
      disease was spiraling and aerial spraying was needed. "That was one of
      the triggers that told us we had a problem," Brown said.

      For now, he said, the district is concentrating on fully covering
      66,000 acres targeted in southern Sacramento County, mostly with aerial
      spraying, supplemented with ground crews. If winds prevent spraying,
      the schedule may be stretched out over Sunday evening and beyond.

      In the light dosage being applied, the insecticide is considered safe
      for people and animals. People are advised to stay inside between 8:30
      p.m. and midnight.


      About the writer:

      The Bee's Deb Kollars can be reached at (916) 321-1090 or
      dkollars@....













      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gary Zamzow
      Hi Debbie, Kay, and others in Alameda County, Here is a link for reporting dead birds in Alameda County, and other information about WNV in Alameda County.
      Message 2 of 15 , Sep 1, 2005
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        Hi Debbie, Kay, and others in Alameda County,

        Here is a link for reporting dead birds in Alameda County, and other
        information
        about WNV in Alameda County.

        http://www.acgov.org/PublicHealth/wnv/

        I don't know if they want to test the dead birds for WNV.
        I hope that the Jay's don't get hit too hard.

        Take care.
        Gary Zamzow
        Davis, CA





        On Sep 1, 2005, at 9:11 AM, Debbie Viess wrote:

        >
        > Hi Gary,
        > �� There is one park that I go to frequently, and have done so for
        > over 20 years. Stellar�s jays were a constant presense�mobbing and
        > teasing with their calls. Two weeks ago, I saw two Stellars�
        > carcasses/ feather piles in Huckleberry Preserve. There is a fairly
        > stagnant creek at the bottom of the canyon, and high mosquito
        > potential in the Stellars habitat. I am also seeing groupings with far
        > fewer individuals, also, some of the scrub jays are moving into former
        > Stellars� areas. I will keep you posted.
        > �
        > Debbie
        > �
        >
        > Hi Debbie,
        > Is West Nile in the Bay Area, and the Oakland Hills?
        > If it is, and there are lots of mosquitos, Steller's Jays could be
        > vulnerable.
        > Please let me//us know if you hear anything about the Steller's.
        > Take care,
        > Gary Zamzow
        > Davis, CA
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Debbie Viess
        For the most current info on WNV, go to this website: www. westnile.ca.gov/. The news is not good for our California birds.
        Message 3 of 15 , Sep 1, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          For the most current info on WNV, go to this website: www.
          <http://www.westnile.ca.gov/> westnile.ca.gov/. The news is not good for
          our California birds. Humans are the least susceptible to the virus,
          amongst the various affected animal groups. Birds are at the top of the
          list, then horses (which can actually be vaccinated for the virus), then
          humans. It is rarely fatal in humans, and most human exposures cause no
          symptoms. It is deadly in birds and horses.

          WNV has been confirmed in all the counties of CA; when you see a record
          of a human case, you can be sure that the local birds are dying in
          droves. Pray that there is a sufficient reservoir of genetically
          resistant individuals to repopulate.

          Debbie Viess
          Oakland,CA

          -----Original Message-----
          From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of Gary Zamzow
          Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2005 10:03 PM
          To: CALBIRDS
          Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Yellow-billed Magpies & West Nile Virus


          On Aug 31, 2005, at 8:14 PM, Jim Greaves wrote:

          > "dying by the hundreds"? Where are the data? Drops in bird numbers on
          > local scales are normal in fall. It borders on hyperventilation to
          > assume WNV is the cause when there could be other factors such as
          > production in acorns to changes in vegetation to weather that could
          > cause, either singly or in combination, local out-migrations of birds
          > from areas where they "normally" abound. - Jim Greaves, Santa Barbara
          >
          >


          Hi Jim,
          Here is an article from the Sacramento Bee.
          The Davis Enterprise had an article today about the Yellow-billed
          Magpies, but
          it has not been posted on their web-site yet. I'll post it when they
          post it.
          Take care.
          Gary Zamzow
          Davis, CA



          http://www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/13405270p-14246595c.html
          W. Nile's toll on birds is soaring

          The yellow-billed magpie could disappear as virus spreads in north
          state.

          By Deb Kollars -- Bee Staff Writer
          Published 2:15 am PDT Saturday, August 13, 2005
          Story appeared on Page A1 of The Bee
          Get weekday updates of Sacramento Bee headlines and breaking news. Sign
          up here.
          As West Nile virus has moved into Sacramento County with a vengeance,
          it has killed thousands of birds and left wildlife experts worried
          about the survival of one of Northern California's more striking and
          clever birds: the yellow-billed magpie.

          Sacramento County has not only the highest number of confirmed human
          cases of West Nile in the state, but also far and away the highest
          number of birds that have died from the disease.

          According to figures released Friday by the state Department of
          Health Services, the number of reported dead birds in Sacramento County
          was 12,198 so far in 2005, representing 17.6 percent of the total
          69,203 dead bird reports for the state's 58 counties.

          Although not all the birds have been tested - state scientists stop
          testing once they've established West Nile has invaded an area - the
          state's top West Nile experts said there is no question the high dead
          bird counts stem from the disease.

          The actual numbers could easily be 10 times as high as those reported
          because many people do not report dead birds, said Stan Husted,
          supervising public health biologist for the state Department of Health
          Services.

          "It's all happening very fast," Husted said.

          Sacramento County's tally of confirmed human cases of West Nile
          remained at 36. Statewide that number rose from the 118 reported
          Tuesday to 174 Friday, with four people reported dead this year from
          the disease.

          The emerging concerns about birds came as mosquito control experts
          prepared for a second night of aerial spraying in southern Sacramento
          County. They also announced that infected mosquito counts were rising
          in Yolo County and may require insecticide treatments in populated
          areas in future days - most likely with ground rigs on city streets.

          "I don't think we're going to have to do aerial applications over the
          cities of Davis and Woodland," said Dave Brown, manager of the
          Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control District. "We believe we
          can handle them with ground-based units."

          The district is doing the treatments to stop the spread of West Nile,
          which is passed by infected mosquitoes.

          As the new numbers rolled out late Friday afternoon, officials of the
          mosquito control district were keeping an eye on the weather. Plans to
          spray 66,000 acres south of the American River were thwarted on Friday
          night. Planes were grounded after Delta winds picked up.

          Sacramento County is not the only hot spot.

          This summer, the mosquito control district has been using ground rigs
          to control mosquitoes in cemeteries and parks in various Yolo County
          locations, as well as the fairgrounds in Woodland. Agricultural areas
          of Yolo County have been receiving regular aerial sprayings, as they do
          every year, Brown said.

          As of Friday morning, the district had spent about $400,000 on plane
          and materials costs for four nights of spraying. The district has about
          $1 million in reserves to cover all spraying costs.

          Brown said traps in the northern areas of Sacramento County showed kill
          rates of between 40 percent and 80 percent, depending on the location,
          after three nights of aerial spraying.

          For many people, their first and only encounter with West Nile comes
          when they stumble upon a bird that has succumbed to the aggressive
          disease.

          A dead jay in a flower bed. A dead crow on the bike trail. A dead
          magpie lying in the street.

          The images have been haunting Sacramentans, and have provided a
          sobering record of the rapid spread of West Nile.

          Bobbi Larsen, a retiree living near Fair Oaks Boulevard and San Juan
          Avenue, is among many who have discovered birds wobbling on the ground,
          or already dead.

          "In one week's time, we've had 13 dead magpies on a tiny little section
          of our street," Larsen said. "I had a scrub jay who came every day at
          lunchtime and squawked for joy in the birdbath. Now he's gone."

          Dawn Austin, a painting contractor who lives near Orangevale, said she
          buried one bird after another this week under an oak tree on her small
          acreage. Most were jays and magpies.

          "I used to fill my bird feeder every day," Austin said. "Now, it's
          every four days or so."

          Many have mistakenly concluded the birds are dying from the aerial
          spraying.

          "It's not the spray. It's the virus," said Vicki Kramer, chief of the
          state health department's Vector Borne Disease Program.

          Birds play a critical role in the spread of West Nile virus. Birds are
          a favorite target of mosquitoes. When bitten by infected mosquitoes,
          birds can become "reservoirs" for the virus, passing it along to
          uninfected mosquitoes that bite them. Mosquitoes, in turn, infect
          people, horses and other animals; bird-to-human transmissions do not
          occur.

          Some species of birds are more vulnerable than others. The "corvid"
          family - which includes crows, jays, magpies and ravens - is
          particularly susceptible. Nearly 100 percent of infected crows die,
          usually in about five days, with the other corvid types not far behind,
          Husted said.

          Wildlife experts are especially worried about the yellow-billed magpie,
          said Dr. Holly Ernest, a wildlife veterinarian who directs the Wildlife
          Genetics Lab at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

          One clue the bird is in danger is that the black-billed magpie, which
          lives throughout western North America (except in areas populated by
          the yellow-billed) has been hit hard by West Nile.

          The yellow-billed magpie is not listed as a threatened species. But
          because it is endemic to California, meaning it lives nowhere else, a
          large kill-off could place the bird at risk of survival, Ernest said.
          She is involved in several research projects to monitor the disease's
          impact on the local magpie, including counts being conducted by
          volunteers from Davis as they ride their bicycles.

          A wide range of other birds such as finches, robins, quail, mourning
          doves and certain parakeets also can become infected with West Nile.
          They survive or die at varying rates, depending on the type of bird,
          said Nicholas Komar, research biologist for the Centers for Disease
          Control and Prevention in Fort Collins, Colo.

          Birds remain infectious for several days. Those that become infected
          but survive become immune for life and can pass that immunity to their
          offspring, Komar said. Eventually, the disease will run its course, he
          added, but based on other areas of the country, it could take several
          years. In New York, bird deaths have been a regular summer ritual since
          West Nile first hit in 1999.

          The disease attacks most of the major organs and neurological systems,
          leaving birds staggering and unable to move in the final stages.
          Gauging pain levels in birds is difficult, but researchers said birds
          with West Nile almost certainly suffer. The only way to stop birds from
          becoming infected is to reduce infected mosquito populations, Husted
          said.

          The dead bird reports were a major clue to local officials that the
          disease was spiraling and aerial spraying was needed. "That was one of
          the triggers that told us we had a problem," Brown said.

          For now, he said, the district is concentrating on fully covering
          66,000 acres targeted in southern Sacramento County, mostly with aerial
          spraying, supplemented with ground crews. If winds prevent spraying,
          the schedule may be stretched out over Sunday evening and beyond.

          In the light dosage being applied, the insecticide is considered safe
          for people and animals. People are advised to stay inside between 8:30
          p.m. and midnight.


          About the writer:

          The Bee's Deb Kollars can be reached at (916) 321-1090 or
          dkollars@....













          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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        • Jim Greaves
          Thanks. Wish it weren t true ... for the sake of the magpies and other birds! :-( ... [snipped] [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 15 , Sep 1, 2005
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            Thanks. Wish it weren't true ... for the sake of the magpies and
            other birds! :-(
            At 10:03 PM 8/31/2005, Gary Zamzow wrote:
            >[snipped]Hi Jim,
            >Here is an article from the Sacramento Bee.
            >The Davis Enterprise had an article today about the Yellow-billed
            >Magpies, but
            >it has not been posted on their web-site yet. I'll post it when they
            >post it.
            >Take care.
            >Gary Zamzow
            >Davis, CA
            >
            ><http://www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/13405270p-14246595c.html>http://www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/13405270p-14246595c.html
            >W. Nile's toll on birds is soaring
            [snipped]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Lilith Mageborn
            On my way back from a pelagic trip on Monday, I stopped at a rest stop on US 101 between Camp Roberts and Paso Robles. There was a Yellow-billed Magpie
            Message 5 of 15 , Sep 1, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              On my way back from a pelagic trip on Monday, I stopped at a rest stop on
              US 101 between Camp Roberts and Paso Robles. There was a Yellow-billed
              Magpie strutting all over the parking lot. I tried to get a picture of
              it with my digicam but it took exception to that (and I was sitting
              inside my truck in the shade). It flew up into a tree, scolding me, and
              finally flew off elsewhere. One other location I've seen YBMs is Morgan
              Hill in Santa Clara County, the northernmost reach of its range; a friend
              who lives there pointed them out to me in March 2003.

              Monday's YBM looked pretty lively to me and I hope it's one of the
              resistant ones.

              Sue Jorgenson
              Anaheim CA

              On Thu, 01 Sep 2005 15:28:06 -0700 Jim Greaves <lbvi.man@...>
              writes:
              > Thanks. Wish it weren't true ... for the sake of the magpies and
              > other birds! :-(

              > At 10:03 PM 8/31/2005, Gary Zamzow wrote:
              > >[snipped]Hi Jim,
              > >Here is an article from the Sacramento Bee.
              > >The Davis Enterprise had an article today about the Yellow-billed
              > >Magpies, but
              > >it has not been posted on their web-site yet. I'll post it when
              > they
              > >post it.
              > >Take care.
              > >Gary Zamzow
              > >Davis, CA
              > >
              >
              ><http://www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/13405270p-14246595c.html>http:
              //www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/13405270p-14246595c.html
              > >W. Nile's toll on birds is soaring
              > [snipped]
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
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            • Ken Burton
              Lilith, To set the record straight, Morgan Hill is far from the northernmost reach of the YBMA s range. That award goes to the Shasta Lake area in Shasta
              Message 6 of 15 , Sep 1, 2005
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                Lilith,

                To set the record straight, Morgan Hill is far from the "northernmost reach" of the YBMA's range. That award goes to the Shasta Lake area in Shasta County.

                Ken Burton
                McKinleyville
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Lilith Mageborn
                To: calbirds@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, September 01, 2005 5:17 PM
                Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Yellow-billed Magpies & West Nile Virus


                On my way back from a pelagic trip on Monday, I stopped at a rest stop on
                US 101 between Camp Roberts and Paso Robles. There was a Yellow-billed
                Magpie strutting all over the parking lot. I tried to get a picture of
                it with my digicam but it took exception to that (and I was sitting
                inside my truck in the shade). It flew up into a tree, scolding me, and
                finally flew off elsewhere. One other location I've seen YBMs is Morgan
                Hill in Santa Clara County, the northernmost reach of its range; a friend
                who lives there pointed them out to me in March 2003.

                Monday's YBM looked pretty lively to me and I hope it's one of the
                resistant ones.

                Sue Jorgenson
                Anaheim CA

                On Thu, 01 Sep 2005 15:28:06 -0700 Jim Greaves <lbvi.man@...>
                writes:
                > Thanks. Wish it weren't true ... for the sake of the magpies and
                > other birds! :-(

                > At 10:03 PM 8/31/2005, Gary Zamzow wrote:
                > >[snipped]Hi Jim,
                > >Here is an article from the Sacramento Bee.
                > >The Davis Enterprise had an article today about the Yellow-billed
                > >Magpies, but
                > >it has not been posted on their web-site yet. I'll post it when
                > they
                > >post it.
                > >Take care.
                > >Gary Zamzow
                > >Davis, CA
                > >
                >
                ><http://www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/13405270p-14246595c.html>http:
                //www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/13405270p-14246595c.html
                > >W. Nile's toll on birds is soaring
                > [snipped]
                >
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              • Lilith Mageborn
                Thanks for the clarification. I had been informed in 2003 that Morgan Hill was as far as they got -- but they seem to be getting around, don t they? :-) Sue
                Message 7 of 15 , Sep 1, 2005
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                  Thanks for the clarification. I had been informed in 2003 that Morgan
                  Hill was as far as they got -- but they seem to be getting around, don't
                  they? :-)

                  Sue

                  On Thu, 1 Sep 2005 17:30:45 -0700 "Ken Burton" <kmburton@...>
                  writes:
                  > Lilith,
                  >
                  > To set the record straight, Morgan Hill is far from the
                  > "northernmost reach" of the YBMA's range. That award goes to the
                  > Shasta Lake area in Shasta County.
                  >
                  > Ken Burton
                  > McKinleyville
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: Lilith Mageborn
                  > To: calbirds@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Thursday, September 01, 2005 5:17 PM
                  > Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Yellow-billed Magpies & West Nile Virus
                  >
                  >
                  > On my way back from a pelagic trip on Monday, I stopped at a rest
                  > stop on
                  > US 101 between Camp Roberts and Paso Robles. There was a
                  > Yellow-billed
                  > Magpie strutting all over the parking lot. I tried to get a
                  > picture of
                  > it with my digicam but it took exception to that (and I was
                  > sitting
                  > inside my truck in the shade). It flew up into a tree, scolding
                  > me, and
                  > finally flew off elsewhere. One other location I've seen YBMs is
                  > Morgan
                  > Hill in Santa Clara County, the northernmost reach of its range; a
                  > friend
                  > who lives there pointed them out to me in March 2003.
                  >
                  > Monday's YBM looked pretty lively to me and I hope it's one of
                  > the
                  > resistant ones.
                  >
                  > Sue Jorgenson
                  > Anaheim CA
                  >
                  > On Thu, 01 Sep 2005 15:28:06 -0700 Jim Greaves
                  > <lbvi.man@...>
                  > writes:
                  > > Thanks. Wish it weren't true ... for the sake of the magpies and
                  >
                  > > other birds! :-(
                  >
                  > > At 10:03 PM 8/31/2005, Gary Zamzow wrote:
                  > > >[snipped]Hi Jim,
                  > > >Here is an article from the Sacramento Bee.
                  > > >The Davis Enterprise had an article today about the
                  > Yellow-billed
                  > > >Magpies, but
                  > > >it has not been posted on their web-site yet. I'll post it when
                  >
                  > > they
                  > > >post it.
                  > > >Take care.
                  > > >Gary Zamzow
                  > > >Davis, CA
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  ><http://www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/13405270p-14246595c.html>http:
                  > //www.sacbee.com/content/news/story/13405270p-14246595c.html
                  > > >W. Nile's toll on birds is soaring
                  > > [snipped]
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
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                • Gary Zamzow
                  Hi Debbie, That is a good observation by your friend. Might be the work of an Accipiter. Hope so. I read that there are fewer reports of dead birds in the
                  Message 8 of 15 , Sep 4, 2005
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                    Hi Debbie,

                    That is a good observation by your friend. Might be the work of an
                    Accipiter. Hope so.

                    I read that there are fewer reports of dead birds in the
                    Davis/Sacramento area.
                    It might be because the virus has run its course, or that there are
                    fewer birds left to die.

                    I'm still finding Magpies in my census area, and pockets of Magpies
                    elsewhere.
                    I hope that these have developed an immunity to the WNV, and will be
                    nesting next spring.

                    I don't see large flocks of Magpies flying in and out of Davis at dawn
                    and dusk like I did last year at this time.
                    I'll keep counting Magpies to document a trend, which as of now, is
                    down.

                    Thank you Debbie, and take care.
                    Gary Zamzow
                    Davis, CA


                    On Sep 4, 2005, at 9:19 AM, Debbie Viess wrote:

                    >
                    > Hi Gary,
                    >   My data at this point on WNV in Stellers is circumstantial. A gal
                    > that lives close by Huckleberry Preserve in the Oakland Hills tells me
                    > that jays have been abundant at her feeders. If that is still
                    > currently the case, then perhaps my concern has been misguided. The
                    > feather piles and carcass could have been caused by an acciipiter. I
                    > will continue to monitor, and let you know if I obtain more and better
                    > data; if I find an intact carcass, I will send it off.
                    >  
                    > Debbie
                    >
                    >
                    > Hi Debbie,
                    > Is West Nile in the Bay Area, and the Oakland Hills?
                    > If it is, and there are lots of mosquitos, Steller's Jays could be
                    > vulnerable.
                    > Please let me//us know if you hear anything about the Steller's.
                    > Take care,
                    > Gary Zamzow
                    > Davis, CA
                    >
                    >
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                  • Gary Zamzow
                    Hi Michelle, That is good news. Can use some these days. Would you like to document the number of Magpies that you see? You could just count/estimate the ones
                    Message 9 of 15 , Sep 5, 2005
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                      Hi Michelle,

                      That is good news. Can use some these days.
                      Would you like to document the number of Magpies that you see?
                      You could just count/estimate the ones flying over, or roosting, or
                      nesting in your neighborhood.
                      I keep the tally on my computer.
                      Here is a link for information about counting Magpies.
                      http://www.vgl.ucdavis.edu/wildlife/projects_BBB.html

                      Sacramento/Davis has been the epicenter for WNV in California this year.
                      I hope that it doesn't get to your Magpies.

                      Thank you and take care.
                      Gary Zamzow
                      Davis, CA


                      On Sep 4, 2005, at 5:36 PM, Michelle Burkey wrote:

                      > Hi Gary
                      >  I live in North  Fairfield and am still seeing large flocks of YBM's
                      > every morning and evening. I saw several flocks of at least 50+ this
                      > morning and expect they'll be back this evening. I estimate at least
                      > 200 a day go over coming and going each day here.
                      >
                      > Michelle
                      >
                      >
                      > At 03:50 PM 9/4/2005 -0700, you wrote:
                      >> Hi Debbie,
                      >>
                      >> That is a good observation by your friend. Might be the work of an
                      >> Accipiter. Hope so.
                      >>
                      >> I read that there are fewer reports of dead birds in the
                      >> Davis/Sacramento area.
                      >> It might be because the virus has run its course, or that there are
                      >> fewer birds left to die.
                      >>
                      >> I'm still finding Magpies in my census area, and pockets of Magpies
                      >> elsewhere.
                      >> I hope that these have developed an immunity to the WNV, and will be
                      >> nesting next spring.
                      >>
                      >> I don't see large flocks of Magpies flying in and out of Davis at
                      >> dawn
                      >> and dusk like I did last year at this time.
                      >> I'll keep counting Magpies to document a trend, which as of now, is
                      >> down.
                      >>
                      >> Thank you Debbie, and take care.
                      >> Gary Zamzow
                      >> Davis, CA
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> On Sep 4, 2005, at 9:19 AM, Debbie Viess wrote:
                      >>
                      >> >
                      >> > Hi Gary,
                      >> >   My data at this point on WNV in Stellers is circumstantial. A gal
                      >> > that lives close by Huckleberry Preserve in the Oakland Hills
                      >> tells me
                      >> > that jays have been abundant at her feeders. If that is still
                      >> > currently the case, then perhaps my concern has been misguided. The
                      >> > feather piles and carcass could have been caused by an acciipiter.
                      >> I
                      >> > will continue to monitor, and let you know if I obtain more and
                      >> better
                      >> > data; if I find an intact carcass, I will send it off.
                      >> > 
                      >> > Debbie
                      >> >
                      >> >
                      >> > Hi Debbie,
                      >> > Is West Nile in the Bay Area, and the Oakland Hills?
                      >> > If it is, and there are lots of mosquitos, Steller's Jays could be
                      >> >  vulnerable.
                      >> > Please let me//us know if you hear anything about the Steller's.
                      >> > Take care,
                      >> > Gary Zamzow
                      >> > Davis, CA
                    • Debbie Viess
                      CA birders, Sorry for the cross-posting if you are also on the EBB list. I am still trying to puzzle out the migrant that we saw at our window. The closest
                      Message 10 of 15 , Oct 3, 2005
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                        CA birders,
                        Sorry for the cross-posting if you are also on the EBB list. I am
                        still trying to puzzle out the migrant that we saw at our window. The
                        closest match that I can come up with is a Taiga Orange-crowned Warbler
                        (it was solidly unmarked gray on its head, breast and back, with a white
                        eye stripe.couldn't see its butt in the dark). Would this be a possible
                        migrant in the area above Lake Tahoe? Thanks for any help from our
                        various CA birding mavens. D.V.


                        This past weekend, I was up at Echo Lake Lodge, just west of Lake Tahoe
                        along Hwy. 50. I was in the company of many mushrooming friends for a
                        weekend of mushroom hunting and feasting, but of course I brought my
                        binoculars; from the deck of the chalet, the birds were often at eye
                        level. Goshawks were our dramatic, local accipiter, and my friend
                        Howard, also a mushrooming birder, saw both Blue Grouse and a Merlin.
                        The Clark's Nutcracker's must be anticipating a hard winter.their crops
                        were bulging grotesquely with nuts, to the point where one flying by
                        almost had the profile of a folded-neck heron! The Steller's jays were
                        in raucous voice, and beautiful, fresh plumage; I especially liked the
                        pale electric blue streaks on their heads. Saturday night, a plain,
                        little gray bird with a faint white eye-line (vireo or warbler, lousy
                        light at night) appeared at the window of our main room. It had been
                        migrating over, but was captivated by either the light or its own
                        reflection. At any rate, we had to turn off all of our lights to get it
                        to go back on its journey. After a few minutes of dark, it disappeared.
                        Happy trails, little fella.

                        Debbie Viess
                        Oakland, CA


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