Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [CALBIRDS] Need ID on bird raiding hummingbird feeder

Expand Messages
  • Matt Sadowski
    Many birds other than hummingbirds drink from hummingbird feeders. I have seen Yellow-rumped Warblers and House Finches do it. Orioles are one of the most
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 6, 2005
      Many birds other than hummingbirds drink from hummingbird feeders. I have seen Yellow-rumped Warblers and House Finches do it. Orioles are one of the most common non-hummingbird nectar drinkers. Bullock's and Hooded Orioles arrived last month from their wintering grounds. From your description it sounds like Hooded Orioles are your visitors. If you have any fan palms in your neighborhood start looking for their yellowish bag-like nests underneath the leaves.

      Matt Sadowski
      Chula Vista, CA

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "ken_k_calif" <ellipsis@...>
      To: <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2005 12:10 PM
      Subject: [CALBIRDS] Need ID on bird raiding hummingbird feeder





      I live in El Sobrante, CA, which is in the foothills of the East San
      Francisco Bay Area. I maintain a hummingbird feeder, and noticed
      recently that the solution was disappearing at an unprecedented rate.
      I finally caught a larger bird feeding, but have no idea what it is. I haven't seen anything like it before. I have also seen it sipping
      nectar from the flowers of a nearby Albutilon (Flowering Maple). THe
      bird is slightly larger than a sparrow, and overall, it bears a strong resemblance to the sparrow, with the following exceptions:

      The beak is slender with a slight downward curve, and is about ¾"
      long, which leads me to believe that it is a nectar-feeder. The crown
      and back of the head are more rounded than a sparrow, and there is no
      crest. The head and breast are bright chartreuse yellow, with the
      exception of a black 'bib' under the face, about ½" wide, extending
      about an inch down onto the breast. There is a vague 'horizontal' (as
      the bird perches) white band on the wing. It has been accompanied by
      what I assume is a female, which is much more sparrow-like in
      coloration, having a muted, darker green overtone on it's breast.











      Unsubscribe: mailto:CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
      Listowners: mailto:CALBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com

      For vacation suspension of mail go to the website. Click on Edit My
      Membership and set your mail option to No Email. Or, send a blank email to
      these addresses:
      Turn off email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-nomail@yahoogroups.com
      Resume email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-normal@yahoogroups.com


      Yahoo! Groups Links
    • VALERIE CRAMER
      Hello, Ken. Welcome. I d guess that you have spotted a beautiful hooded oriole. They are known for raiding hummingbird feeders, balancing awkwardly, to take
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 6, 2005
        Hello, Ken.

        Welcome. I'd guess that you have spotted a beautiful hooded oriole. They are known for raiding hummingbird feeders, balancing awkwardly, to take their fill of sugar water.

        You can encourage this one by putting up an oriole feeder, an orange feeder with larger feeding ports designed for this bird. They also like to take juice from a half orange attached firmly to a board, or some grape jelly put out in a muffin tin, or a special oriole "jelly & orange half" feeder.

        They certainly are beautiful, aren't they. I wish they'd hurry up and come to where I live in Santa Rosa, CA. Enjoy. --Valerie

        ken_k_calif <ellipsis@...> wrote:


        Hi, I just joined this group, and I couldn't find anything in the
        archives that answered my question. Please forgive the lack of
        technical terms in my message - when it comes to birding, I'm one of
        the "Unwashed Masses".

        I live in El Sobrante, CA, which is in the foothills of the East San
        Francisco Bay Area. I maintain a hummingbird feeder, and noticed
        recently that the solution was disappearing at an unprecedented rate.
        I finally caught a larger bird feeding, but have no idea what it is. I
        haven't seen anything like it before. I have also seen it sipping
        nectar from the flowers of a nearby Albutilon (Flowering Maple). THe
        bird is slightly larger than a sparrow, and overall, it bears a strong
        resemblance to the sparrow, with the following exceptions:

        The beak is slender with a slight downward curve, and is about �"
        long, which leads me to believe that it is a nectar-feeder. The crown
        and back of the head are more rounded than a sparrow, and there is no
        crest. The head and breast are bright chartreuse yellow, with the
        exception of a black 'bib' under the face, about �" wide, extending
        about an inch down onto the breast. There is a vague 'horizontal' (as
        the bird perches) white band on the wing. It has been accompanied by
        what I assume is a female, which is much more sparrow-like in
        coloration, having a muted, darker green overtone on it's breast.

        With it's longer-than-normal beak, it is able to feed at the
        hummingbird feeder, in spite of the bee-guards. It's a clever bird -
        this morning, two of the bee guards had been pulled off and were on
        the ground.

        Thanks for any help,
        Ken
        El Sobrante








        Unsubscribe: mailto:CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
        Listowners: mailto:CALBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com

        For vacation suspension of mail go to the website. Click on Edit My Membership and set your mail option to No Email. Or, send a blank email to these addresses:
        Turn off email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-nomail@yahoogroups.com
        Resume email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-normal@yahoogroups.com





        ---------------------------------
        Yahoo! Groups Links

        To visit your group on the web, go to:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS/

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Nancy
        Ken, I believe you have a Hooded Oriole! I ve seen them once in a great while at my hummingbird feeder, most recently last Sunday. Beautiful bird! Nancy
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 6, 2005
          Ken, I believe you have a Hooded Oriole! I've seen them once in a great while at my hummingbird feeder, most recently last Sunday. Beautiful bird!

          Nancy Feagans
          Lake Elsinore, CA

          ken_k_calif <ellipsis@...> wrote:


          Hi, I just joined this group, and I couldn't find anything in the
          archives that answered my question. Please forgive the lack of
          technical terms in my message - when it comes to birding, I'm one of
          the "Unwashed Masses".

          I live in El Sobrante, CA, which is in the foothills of the East San
          Francisco Bay Area. I maintain a hummingbird feeder, and noticed
          recently that the solution was disappearing at an unprecedented rate.
          I finally caught a larger bird feeding, but have no idea what it is. I
          haven't seen anything like it before. I have also seen it sipping
          nectar from the flowers of a nearby Albutilon (Flowering Maple). THe
          bird is slightly larger than a sparrow, and overall, it bears a strong
          resemblance to the sparrow, with the following exceptions:

          The beak is slender with a slight downward curve, and is about �"
          long, which leads me to believe that it is a nectar-feeder. The crown
          and back of the head are more rounded than a sparrow, and there is no
          crest. The head and breast are bright chartreuse yellow, with the
          exception of a black 'bib' under the face, about �" wide, extending
          about an inch down onto the breast. There is a vague 'horizontal' (as
          the bird perches) white band on the wing. It has been accompanied by
          what I assume is a female, which is much more sparrow-like in
          coloration, having a muted, darker green overtone on it's breast.

          With it's longer-than-normal beak, it is able to feed at the
          hummingbird feeder, in spite of the bee-guards. It's a clever bird -
          this morning, two of the bee guards had been pulled off and were on
          the ground.

          Thanks for any help,
          Ken
          El Sobrante








          Unsubscribe: mailto:CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
          Listowners: mailto:CALBIRDS-owner@yahoogroups.com

          For vacation suspension of mail go to the website. Click on Edit My Membership and set your mail option to No Email. Or, send a blank email to these addresses:
          Turn off email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-nomail@yahoogroups.com
          Resume email delivery: mailto:CALBIRDS-normal@yahoogroups.com





          ---------------------------------
          Yahoo! Groups Links

          To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS/

          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          CALBIRDS-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.