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juv Broad-tailed Hawk, exotics

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  • Thomas Miko
    Dear Kimball and LA Birders, This afternoon at 1:45 pm a bird flew over me at Hazard Park, East Los Angeles, that I believe was a juvenile light phase
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 24, 2005
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      Dear Kimball and LA Birders,

      This afternoon at 1:45 pm a bird flew over me at Hazard Park, East Los Angeles, that I believe was a juvenile light phase Broad-winged Hawk. It was flying swiftly in a straight line overhead, going from west to east. Description given in the last paragraph. When I get home from work tonight I need to check Garrett & Dunn for status and distribution, i.e. will I get laughed off the list for claiming to see a BW Hawk in February. The other thing that I don't remember is how long it can take a buteo to reach adult plumage, i.e. can a Broad-winged Hawk still look like a juvenile in late February?


      To digress for a moment to exotic birds: I am not "for" or "against" them, i.e. I don't "need" them for my list, lifelist, A.B.A. list, or whatever. They are here, and since we see them, they bring questions up that I desire to ask, because I am curious about biology in general, and birds in particular. But, I agree with a lot of other peoples' statements like Ken and Ali about exotics in terms of how man has altered the ecology.

      Okay, this last part is documentation for Kimball:
      Small buteo type hawk. Shaped like a micro Red-tailed Hawk. Not shaped like an accipiter, harrier, or falcon. Tail length and width not correct for Cooper's or Sharp-shinned Hawk, too short and broad for that. Tail and wing length, breadth, and general shape similar but not 100% same as Red-tailed Hawk. I only saw the bird from underneath, and it was appr. 100 feet above me (my guess). Its entire underside was a pale mottled whitish grayish color. There was no rufous. I did not see barring on the undertail, to delineate Red-shouldered vs Broad-winged Hawks. The head was darker than the body, the way that Red-tailed and Swainson's Hawks heads are "separate" from the body, but I cannot give a more specific description, as this all happened so quickly. The entire end or tip of the wings was "dipped in black ink" in a manner reminiscent of Levantine Sparrowhawk (even though that's an accipiter). There were no patagial bars or other distinct patterns on the underwing. As the bird was flying away from me, I looked for but did not see the big white spot or rectangle on the end of the wings that Red-shouldered has.


      Thomas Miko (Mikó Tamás)

      thomas.miko@...
      thomas_miko@...

      653 S. Indian Hill Blvd., #C
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