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Re: [CALBIRDS] little gray bird ID help please

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  • OrCoRBA
    Andrei, First may I suggest, since you are interested in identifying birds, that you find in your area a local Audubon Society or other organization that gives
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 13, 2004
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      Andrei,
      First may I suggest, since you are interested in identifying birds, that you
      find in your area a local Audubon Society or other organization that gives
      courses on bird identification for beginners, or that gives free field trips
      with accomplished leaders. You might also want to find a local message
      board for birders in your area that could help you as your birding skills
      increase. As you develop skills in identification, you will find it's not
      just field marks in a book that birders use, but knowing what is in their
      area, when it is in their area, how abundant the species is in their area,
      and what habitats and behaviors the birds would show. With experience you
      won't confuse a gnatcatcher with a flycatcher with a warbler. For example,
      does the gnatcatchers in your field guide show any yellow? Does this bird
      sit in an exposed area on the top of a twig or post waiting for an insect to
      come by, and then return to the same post time and time again like a
      flycatcher? In addition, as you gain proficiency in bird identification,
      you will accumulate a useful vocabulary of bird anatomy....so that the small
      of the back becomes a bird's rump. There are a number of bird guides and CDs
      that would also help you in your quest. You might regularly bird a nearby
      park and get a feeling for the changing of the seasons and the changing bird
      life. Also may I suggest you start to learn the local common birds well,
      before you tackle the uncommon species. You might start by looking at the
      House Finch, Starling, and Yellow-rumped Warbler in your field guide (or
      check it out on the Internet) and see if you can find any of those species
      in your area.
      Joel Weintraub
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