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BANDED TURNSTONES AND BLACK BELLIED PLOVERS

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  • Gjon_Hazard@r1.fws.gov
    FYI -- This is from the Ornithological Societies of North America (OSNA) Newsletter: HELP US FIND COLOR BANDED TURNSTONES AND BLACK BELLIED PLOVERS--We color
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 7 1:18 PM
      FYI -- This is from the Ornithological Societies of North America (OSNA)
      Newsletter:

      HELP US FIND COLOR BANDED TURNSTONES AND BLACK BELLIED PLOVERS--We color
      banded Ruddy Turnstones and Black bellied Plovers near Nome, Alaska in June
      2004. Each bird wears a USGS silver metal band plus some combination of
      color bands. It is important to record the exact sequence on each leg.
      Please send observations along with location, date, your name and
      background (biologist, birder, etc.) and how to contact you if you are
      willing to be contacted should we need further information. Report any
      sightings to: PHIL BRUNER Biology Dept., Brigham Young University Hawaii,
      55 220 Kulanui St. Laie HI 96762. (EM: brunerp@..., PH: 808-293-3820,
      FX: 808-293-3825).

      ------------

      Please do not send reports to me. Thanks.

      Cheers,
      -Gj

      ====================================
      Gjon C. Hazard
      Fish and Wildlife Biologist
      Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office
      6010 Hidden Valley Road
      Carlsbad, CA 92009 USA
      Voice: 760/431-9440x287
      FAX: 760/431-9624
      E-mail: Gjon_Hazard@...
      http://carlsbad.fws.gov/
      ====================================
    • Al Eisner
      ... I don t understand why we repeatedly see these requests for bird band reports which require us to save or remember a variety of addresses to send reports
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 7 3:34 PM
        Gjon Hazard wrote:

        > FYI -- This is from the Ornithological Societies of North America (OSNA)
        > Newsletter:
        >
        > HELP US FIND COLOR BANDED TURNSTONES AND BLACK BELLIED PLOVERS--We color
        > banded Ruddy Turnstones and Black bellied Plovers near Nome, Alaska in June
        > 2004. Each bird wears a USGS silver metal band plus some combination of
        > color bands. It is important to record the exact sequence on each leg.
        > Please send observations along with location, date, your name and
        > background (biologist, birder, etc.) and how to contact you if you are
        > willing to be contacted should we need further information. Report any
        > sightings to: PHIL BRUNER Biology Dept., Brigham Young University Hawaii,
        > 55 220 Kulanui St. Laie HI 96762. (EM: brunerp@..., PH: 808-293-3820,
        > FX: 808-293-3825).

        I don't understand why we repeatedly see these requests for bird band
        reports which require us to save or remember a variety of addresses to
        send reports for different species or different types of bands. There
        are too many such requests to keep track of, and frankly I (and I suspect
        many others) don't even bother to save them. It was my understanding that
        all such reports can and should be sent to the Bird Banding Laboratory at
        Patuxent -- don't they act as a clearing-house and rerouter for sightings
        of banded birds? Is that still true? If it is, then surely the banders
        must know about it. It would seem to me that they ought to advertise this
        central facility, rather than expecting birders to save and/or remember
        a myriad of different addresses and phone numbers. Wouldn't that work?

        I'm not at all picking on Gjon, who I know was just a neutral relayer of
        this message. My comments above are ones I've thought about making
        several times in the past. Note also that I'm not at all objecting to
        circulating a specific request for help, only to the method of reporting
        which is almost-invariably requested.
        Al Eisner
      • Kimball Garrett
        Al: It is true that color-banded and other marked wild birds should be reported to the Bird Banding Lab (easy to do by telephone or through their web site).
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 7 3:51 PM
          Al:

          It is true that color-banded and other marked wild birds should be
          reported to the Bird Banding Lab (easy to do by telephone or through
          their web site). However, I find specific requests such as Phil
          Bruner's for his turnstones and plovers quite helpful for a couple of
          reasons.

          First, being aware of such studies, I (and other birders, I presume)
          will make a special effort to peruse flocks of the relevant species for
          bands; believe me, it's pretty easy to miss leg bands if you're not
          specifically looking for them.

          Second, it really is helpful to the researcher to get sightings reported
          directly to them. Mary Gustafson and the others in the banding lab do a
          great job, but they don't have the resources to get the sightings to the
          researchers in a timely fashion. This can be important, because the
          researchers may want to follow up on sightings or contact the observer
          to clarify or amplify details. We've been working with banded Black
          Skimmers for years, and we would have very little data if we relied
          solely on information submitted to the Banding Lab.

          Finally, such requests get to the heart of what regional or statewide
          listserves can contribute to field ornithology. Such postings rank well
          above 80% of the gibberish that graces most birding listserves (some of
          which I've contributed...).

          Al does make a good point that it would be very useful to have an easily
          searchable archive of such requests; at this point we all save such
          requests in our own, often clumsy, ways.

          -- Kimball

          Kimball L. Garrett
          Ornithology Collections Manager
          Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
          900 Exposition Blvd.
          Los Angeles CA 90007
          (213) 763-3368
          (213) 746-2999 FAX
          kgarrett@...

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Al Eisner [mailto:eisner@...]
          Sent: Thursday, October 07, 2004 3:35 PM
          To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] BANDED TURNSTONES AND BLACK BELLIED PLOVERS

          > HELP US FIND COLOR BANDED TURNSTONES AND BLACK BELLIED PLOVERS--We
          color
          > banded Ruddy Turnstones and Black bellied Plovers near Nome, Alaska in
          June
          > 2004

          I don't understand why we repeatedly see these requests for bird band
          reports which require us to save or remember a variety of addresses to
          send reports for different species or different types of bands.
        • Les Chibana
          Interestingly, one of these banded birds, a Ruddy Turnstone, has already turned up in the Kona area of Hawaii. It was reported on 9/26/04. It was banded on
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 7 3:54 PM
            Interestingly, one of these banded birds, a Ruddy Turnstone, has already
            turned up in the Kona area of Hawaii. It was reported on 9/26/04. It was
            banded on 6/5/04.

            Also, there are 2 banded Wandering Tattlers that have been returning to
            Hilo and Kona, Hawaii, since 1999. These were banded on the North
            Slope and Lake Clark, Alaska, in 1998 and 1999.

            So keep an eye out for banded individuals of these species in CA.

            Les Chibana
            Palo Alto CA

            On Oct 7, 2004, at 1:18 PM, Gjon_Hazard@... wrote:

            >
            > FYI -- This is from the Ornithological Societies of North America
            > (OSNA)
            > Newsletter:
            >
            > HELP US FIND COLOR BANDED TURNSTONES AND BLACK BELLIED PLOVERS--We
            > color
            > banded Ruddy Turnstones and Black bellied Plovers near Nome, Alaska in
            > June
            > 2004. Each bird wears a USGS silver metal band plus some combination of
            > color bands. It is important to record the exact sequence on each leg.
            > Please send observations along with location, date, your name and
            > background (biologist, birder, etc.) and how to contact you if you are
            > willing to be contacted should we need further information. Report any
            > sightings to: PHIL BRUNER Biology Dept., Brigham Young University
            > Hawaii,
            > 55 220 Kulanui St. Laie HI 96762. (EM: brunerp@..., PH:
            > 808-293-3820,
            > FX: 808-293-3825).
            >
            > ------------
            >
            > Please do not send reports to me. Thanks.
            >
            > Cheers,
            > -Gj
            >
            > ====================================
            > Gjon C. Hazard
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