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Fwd: [BIRDWG05] FWD: Two endangered California condor chicks hatch in Arizona

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  • Paul Fox
    Though this is from the Arizona list it has pertinence for California birds and birding. Hope this is all right. Paul ... [Non-text portions of this message
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 24, 2004
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      Though this is from the Arizona list it has pertinence for California
      birds and birding. Hope this is all right.
      Paul

      Begin forwarded message:

      > From: Mark Stevenson <drbrdr@...>
      > Date: June 24, 2004 5:46:33 PM PDT
      > To: BIRDWG05@...
      > Subject: [BIRDWG05] FWD: Two endangered California condor chicks hatch
      > in Arizona
      > Reply-To: Mark Stevenson <drbrdr@...>
      >
      > From : Arizona Game and Fish:
      >
      > Two endangered California condor chicks hatch in Arizona
      >
      > PHOENIX - Arizona Game and Fish Department biologists are announcing
      > another
      > success in the comeback story of the California condor in our state.
      > Biologists confirm two California condors hatched this summer in
      > Arizona,
      > marking the latest step in the bird's return from the brink of
      > extinction.
      > In 1987, biologists captured the last of the world's only 22 California
      > condors, in an effort to save and breed the species. The birds are
      > being
      > cared for by experts and are periodically released in California,
      > Mexico,
      > and Arizona, as the population begins to rebound. Condors were
      > reintroduced
      > into Arizona in 1996. The new nestlings are another sign that
      > biologists'
      > efforts are working.
      >
      > "We're encouraged by the successful hatching of these two eggs," says
      > Andi
      > Rogers, head of the Arizona Game and Fish Department's condor program.
      > "We
      > hope to see signs of recovery like this every year."
      >
      > Biologists and volunteers haven't actually seen the chicks because
      > they are
      > tucked into their cliff nests, more than a thousand feet away from
      > humans.
      > The parents' behavior patterns confirmed to biologists that the two
      > eggs
      > laid in March had hatched. One nestling is in Grand Canyon National
      > Park.
      > The other is in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument.
      >
      > "The next important milestone for these chicks will be fledging, or
      > learning
      > to fly for the first time," Rogers says. "We expect that to happen in
      > November or December."
      >
      > Arizona's condor population is steadily increasing. With the addition
      > of
      > these two nestlings, the state now has 47 condors in the wild. A total
      > of 97
      > condors are flying free in the world. Visitors to the Grand Canyon may
      > catch
      > a glimpse of the birds flying at the South Rim.
      >
      > "They're a rare treat for visitors both at the Grand Canyon Village
      > and at
      > the base of Vermilion Cliffs," says Rogers.
      >
      > More than 100 California condors are still being cared for in
      > captivity. The
      > birds can weigh up to 23 pounds and have a wingspan of up to 9 1/2
      > feet.
      >
      > The condor reintroduction in Arizona is a joint project of several
      > partners,
      > including Arizona Game and Fish Department, The Peregrine Fund, U.S.
      > Fish
      > and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service,
      > Kaibab National Forest, and Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.
      >
      >
      > forwarded by
      > Mark Stevenson
      > Tucson, AZ
      > 86 43 in 04
      >


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