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Strange Ibis in Placer County

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  • erpfromca@aol.com
    Any zoos or collectors missing a Sacred Ibis? An ibis I presume to be an immature Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopica), was at the Lincoln Sewage Treatment
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 8, 2003
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      Any zoos or collectors missing a Sacred Ibis?

      An ibis I presume to be an immature Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopica),
      was at the Lincoln Sewage Treatment Plant in Lincoln (Waverly Rd south of
      Nicolaus Rd) today. The bird had a red band on its right leg and was able to fly
      well (with no evidence of flight feather clipping) and was fairly wary of human
      approach.

      I received a call this afternoon saying that a Wood Stork was at this site
      and got there about 4PM. The bird was clearly some kind of ibis, but didn't fit
      any plumage of any North American ibis. I managed to get a couple of mediocre
      photos, but excellent looks at the bird standing and in flight.

      My ID is based primarily on Birds of Southern Africa by Sinclair et al. The
      description is below and I would appreciate comments from others familiar with
      exotic ibis species.


      Field notes:

      The bird, a long-legged, long-necked bird with a long, downcurved bill, was
      foraging with Snowy Egrets at the water's edge and was a little larger than the
      Snowys. The body and tail were all white. The head and face and bill were
      dark. The bill was a typical ibis bill, but seemed somewhat more stout and
      thicker at the base than a WF Ibis bill. The legs were jet black.

      The dark extended down from the head along the back of the neck but the
      throat and front of the neck were white.

      In flight the most striking feature was the thin trailing edge of the wings.
      All flight feathers were tipped with black making a thin, distinct black edge
      from the tip of the wing to the body. It appeared that the black extended
      further up on the last couple tertials since one could see a thin black line
      extended forward from the wing along the body at the innermost edge of the wings.
      The black trailing edge of the wings was visible from both above and below.

      On the upper side of the wings there were two thin 'commas' of brownish on
      either side of the carpal joint. In flight only the feet extended beyond the end
      of the tail.


      Appreciate any comments on this ID.

      Ed Pandolfino
      Carmichael, CA


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