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Re: [CVBirds] Strange Ibis in Placer County

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  • Les Chibana
    Ed, In Aug 1992, a Sacred Ibis was at Charleston Slough, Mountain View, Santa Clara Co. I was able to photograph it in flight and next to Snowy Egrets. Your
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 7, 2003
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      Ed,

      In Aug 1992, a Sacred Ibis was at Charleston Slough, Mountain View,
      Santa Clara Co. I was able to photograph it in flight and next to Snowy
      Egrets. Your description matches with what I can see in my slides. The
      alula, or perhaps a short outermost primary, was also extensively tipped
      in black and was a separate mark of black from the trailing edges of the
      wings. The tertials were also extensively black-tipped and appeared as
      black wedges next to the body. The toes extended approx. 5-6 inches
      behind the tail when in flight.

      This ibis was presumably an escapee. I couldn't see any leg bands in
      my slides.

      Les Chibana, Palo Alto


      On Friday, November 7, 2003, at 07:04 PM, ERPFROMCA@... wrote:

      > Any zoos or collectors missing a Sacred Ibis?
      >
      > An ibis I presume to be an immature Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis
      > aethiopica),
      > was at the Lincoln Sewage Treatment Plant in Lincoln (Waverly Rd south
      > of
      > Nicolaus Rd) today. The bird had a red band on its right leg and was
      > able to fly
      > well (with no evidence of flight feather clipping) and was fairly wary
      > of human
      > approach.
      >
      > I received a call this afternoon saying that a Wood Stork was at this
      > site
      > and got there about 4PM. The bird was clearly some kind of ibis, but
      > didn't fit
      > any plumage of any North American ibis. I managed to get a couple of
      > mediocre
      > photos, but excellent looks at the bird standing and in flight.
      >
      > My ID is based primarily on Birds of Southern Africa by Sinclair et
      > al. The
      > description is below and I would appreciate comments from others
      > familiar with
      > exotic ibis species.
      >
      >
      > Field notes:
      >
      > The bird, a long-legged, long-necked bird with a long, downcurved
      > bill, was
      > foraging with Snowy Egrets at the water's edge and was a little larger
      > than the
      > Snowys. The body and tail were all white. The head and face and bill
      > were
      > dark. The bill was a typical ibis bill, but seemed somewhat more stout
      > and
      > thicker at the base than a WF Ibis bill. The legs were jet black.
      >
      > The dark extended down from the head along the back of the neck but the
      > throat and front of the neck were white.
      >
      > In flight the most striking feature was the thin trailing edge of the
      > wings.
      > All flight feathers were tipped with black making a thin, distinct
      > black edge
      > from the tip of the wing to the body. It appeared that the black
      > extended
      > further up on the last couple tertials since one could see a thin
      > black line
      > extended forward from the wing along the body at the innermost edge of
      > the wings.
      > The black trailing edge of the wings was visible from both above and
      > below.
      >
      > On the upper side of the wings there were two thin 'commas' of
      > brownish on
      > either side of the carpal joint. In flight only the feet extended
      > beyond the end
      > of the tail.
      >
      >
      > Appreciate any comments on this ID.
      >
      > Ed Pandolfino
    • Luke Cole
      ... The 1992 bird was also seen at the duckpond at Palo Alto Baylands, and it did have a band. Ed s description sounds good for Sacred Ibis, Threskiornis
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 10, 2003
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        > This ibis was presumably an escapee. I couldn't see any leg bands in
        > my slides.

        The 1992 bird was also seen at the duckpond at Palo Alto Baylands, and it
        did have a band.

        Ed's description sounds good for Sacred Ibis, Threskiornis aethiopicus, and
        not the Madagascar subspecies (which some consider a full species,
        Threskiornis bernieri, and which does not have the black in the primaries).
        Clearly an introduced or escaped bird!

        Luke Cole
        San Francisco
      • Bruce Deuel
        As long as we re going so far afield and so far back in time, I ll mention there was a Sacred Ibis around Humboldt Bay in the summer and fall of 1994. Cheers,
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 10, 2003
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          As long as we're going so far afield and so far back in time, I'll mention there was a Sacred Ibis around Humboldt Bay in the summer and fall of 1994.

          Cheers,


          Bruce Deuel
          California Department of Fish and Game
          Redding
          bdeuel@...

          >>> "Luke Cole" <luke@...> 11/10/03 08:18AM >>>

          > This ibis was presumably an escapee. I couldn't see any leg bands in
          > my slides.

          The 1992 bird was also seen at the duckpond at Palo Alto Baylands, and it
          did have a band.

          Ed's description sounds good for Sacred Ibis, Threskiornis aethiopicus, and
          not the Madagascar subspecies (which some consider a full species,
          Threskiornis bernieri, and which does not have the black in the primaries).
          Clearly an introduced or escaped bird!

          Luke Cole
          San Francisco




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