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Nutting's Flycatcher

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  • Tom Grey
    At Mike Feighner s suggestion, I ve posted a picture I took of the Nutting s Flycatcher at Santa Cruz yesterday to this group s photo file, folder Flycatchers.
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 6, 2003
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      At Mike Feighner's suggestion, I've posted a picture I took of the
      Nutting's Flycatcher at Santa Cruz yesterday to this group's photo file,
      folder Flycatchers. The picture gives a pretty good view of the undertail
      in direct sun. Brown outer rectrices, extending all the way to the tip --
      rufous inner web, also all the way to the tip, rather than the brown
      curling around the whole tip as in Ash-throated. (I'm following the
      discussion in Don Roberson's posted note at
      http://montereybay.com/creagrus/SCZnutting.html

      Howell & Webb say that the Nutting's is hard to distinguish visually from
      Ash-throated in the field; I wonder, is the distinction noted above
      actually diagnostic?

      For my picture, see
      http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/calbirds/lst?.dir=/Flycatchers&.src=gr&
      .order=&.view=t&.done=http%3a//briefcase.yahoo.com/




      Tom Grey
      tgrey@...
    • Leslie Flint
      To follow on Jim Holmes posting of today....the Nutting s was not present again (after 7:45 am) all day until 4:20 in the afternoon when it came in to the back
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 6, 2003
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        To follow on Jim Holmes posting of today....the Nutting's was not
        present again (after 7:45 am) all day until 4:20 in the afternoon when
        it came in to the back of the olive trees at 1425 Laurel where it ate an
        olive (or tried to - it banged it on the tree branch for a while). Then
        it flew to the back of the yard into a leafless tree where it sat and
        preened - the setting sun shining nicely through its spread tail
        feathers. Then it flew to the front of 1411 Laurel and sat in the small
        leafless tree in the yard where we all got great views; it ate a rosehip
        while in the yard. After about 5 minutes it flew to the backyard again.
        It was there for at least 30 minutes in total. Many birders who came
        walked around the blocks on both sides of the street and didn't see the
        bird in any of the previous places (other olive trees, persimmon tree
        etc.) so I was elated it came back to yard where it was originally found.

        Leslie Flint
        San Mateo
      • John Luther
        The Nutting s Flycatcher was still at 1425 Laurel St in Santa Cruz today, Jan 17. Susanne Methvin and I first saw it about 7:59am and it fed for about 10
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 17, 2003
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          The Nutting's Flycatcher was still at 1425 Laurel St in Santa Cruz today,
          Jan 17. Susanne Methvin and I first saw it about 7:59am and it fed for
          about 10 minutes in the Olive trees in the front yard and by the driveway.
          It almost met its demise by the claws and jaws of a cat. The bird seems to
          have a habit of going to the ground to feed and the cat just missed the bird
          as it jumped onto a chair.

          John Luther
          Oakland
        • dsuddjian@aol.com
          The NUTTING S FLYCATCHER was still present today (2/3) at Santa Cruz around 12 noon, although I found it in a new spot. It was at 217 Sherman St., which is the
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 3, 2003
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            The NUTTING'S FLYCATCHER was still present today (2/3) at Santa Cruz around
            12 noon, although I found it in a new spot. It was at 217 Sherman St., which
            is the next street over to the east from its usual Laurel St. haunts. It was
            foraging in a large cottoneaster (eating the berries) and flycatching from
            adjacent trees. I heard several calls that were louder and sharper than what
            I've mostly been hearing from it (which were "weep" or "pweep" type calls).
            The louder calls could be characterized as a variation of the calls I'd heard
            before. I noted them as "pweeet!" or "pweeek!" This call was more drawn out
            than the other call and a bit upslurred.

            David L. Suddjian
            Capitola, CA
            Santa Cruz Bird Club
            Bird Records Keeper
            dsuddjian@...

            Santa Cruz Bird Club website: http://santacruzbirdclub.org/


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