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Gray morph Varied Thrush

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  • Kevin McKereghan
    This morning I observed a gray morph Varied Thrush in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. In Thrushes, Clement describes it as a extremely rare morph,
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 21, 2002
      This morning I observed a gray morph Varied Thrush in
      Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. In Thrushes, Clement
      describes it as a extremely rare morph, represented by
      one speciman, and a British record. I was wondering if
      anyone else has seen this morph and how rare it really
      is. Certainly I had never heard of one being seen, and
      knew of it solely from the Clement book.

      Thanks in advance

      Kevin McKereghan
      San Francisco CA
      theman@...
    • Kimball Garrett
      ... Kevin: These anaurantic Varied Thrushes (lacking typical carotenoid pigments) must be rare indeed, as they are virtually lacking in skin collections. I
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 23, 2002
        At 10:52 AM 12/21/2002 -0800, Kevin McKereghan wrote:
        >This morning I observed a gray morph Varied Thrush in
        >Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. In Thrushes, Clement
        >describes it as a extremely rare morph, represented by
        >one speciman, and a British record. I was wondering if
        >anyone else has seen this morph and how rare it really
        >is. Certainly I had never heard of one being seen, and
        >knew of it solely from the Clement book.


        Kevin:

        These "anaurantic" Varied Thrushes (lacking typical carotenoid pigments)
        must be rare indeed, as they are virtually lacking in skin collections. I
        can cite only one specimen of such a bird from California: a female
        collected 21 November 1977 at Emigrant Gap Ranger Station, Inyo Co. (Cal.
        State Northridge Vertebrate Collections, # 941); this is the specimen cited
        in the Clement Thrush book.

        I have seen only one such bird in life, a male in San Francisquito Canyon,
        Los Angeles Co., one winter in the early 1980s.

        I think a few other birders have seen birds in this plumage, and it would
        be interesting to hear the specifics from them.

        Kimball


        *****************************************************
        Kimball L. Garrett
        Ornithology Collections Manager
        Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
        900 Exposition Blvd.
        Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
        213-763-3368
        213-746-2999 FAX
        kgarrett@...
      • Jeff Davis
        I haven t seen this plumage, but I m aware of another specimen. A female, collected in Berkeley 25 March 1921, is at the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 23, 2002
          I haven't seen this plumage, but I'm aware of another specimen. A female,
          collected in Berkeley 25 March 1921, is at the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
          (#41851). To see a paper about this bird ("An orangeless mutant of the
          Varied Thrush and its bearing on sex differences"), go to
          http://elibrary.unm.edu/Condor/, select the years 1930-1939, then 1931, then
          Vol. 33, no. 4.

          Cheers!

          Jeff Davis
          Prather, CA



          -----Original Message-----
          From: Kimball Garrett [mailto:kgarrett@...]
          Sent: Monday, December 23, 2002 12:56 PM
          To: Kevin McKereghan; CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Gray morph Varied Thrush


          At 10:52 AM 12/21/2002 -0800, Kevin McKereghan wrote:
          >This morning I observed a gray morph Varied Thrush in
          >Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. In Thrushes, Clement
          >describes it as a extremely rare morph, represented by
          >one speciman, and a British record. I was wondering if
          >anyone else has seen this morph and how rare it really
          >is. Certainly I had never heard of one being seen, and
          >knew of it solely from the Clement book.


          Kevin:

          These "anaurantic" Varied Thrushes (lacking typical carotenoid pigments)
          must be rare indeed, as they are virtually lacking in skin collections. I
          can cite only one specimen of such a bird from California: a female
          collected 21 November 1977 at Emigrant Gap Ranger Station, Inyo Co. (Cal.
          State Northridge Vertebrate Collections, # 941); this is the specimen cited
          in the Clement Thrush book.

          I have seen only one such bird in life, a male in San Francisquito Canyon,
          Los Angeles Co., one winter in the early 1980s.

          I think a few other birders have seen birds in this plumage, and it would
          be interesting to hear the specifics from them.

          Kimball


          *****************************************************
          Kimball L. Garrett
          Ornithology Collections Manager
          Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
          900 Exposition Blvd.
          Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
          213-763-3368
          213-746-2999 FAX
          kgarrett@...



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        • creagrus
          Regarding anaurantic or schizochroist Varied Thrushes, there is a photo of such a bird on my web site at http://montereybay.com/creagrus/thrushes.html about
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 24, 2002
            Regarding anaurantic or schizochroist Varied Thrushes, there is a photo
            of such a bird on my web site at
            http://montereybay.com/creagrus/thrushes.html about halfway down the
            page.

            I photographed that bird at Emigrant Ranger Station, Death Valley Nat'l
            Park, California, on 17 Nov 1977. Until I read Kimball's post, I was
            unaware that it had been collected 4 days later (by whom?; given the
            date and place I presume these are the same birds). I have corresponded
            with Peter Clement about my bird and the British vagrant which showed
            similar characteristics and, if I am remembering right, there is a paper
            on the British vagrant in "British Birds" magazine. I may have gotten
            the word "schizochroism" from him.

            Don Roberson
          • Joseph Morlan
            It may be worth noting that a male Varied Thrush of otherwise similar description was reported in Santa Cruz earlier this month. See:
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 24, 2002
              It may be worth noting that a male Varied Thrush of otherwise similar
              description was reported in Santa Cruz earlier this month. See:

              http://www.sialia.com/s/calists.pl?rm=msg;prm=idx;dir=mbb;msg=1039040961-54915.txt

              --
              Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA 94044 jmorlan@...
              SF Spring Birding Classes - Feb 4 http://fog.ccsf.org/~jmorlan/
              California Bird Records Committee http://www.wfo-cbrc.org/cbrc/
            • Kimball Garrett
              ... Don and Calbirders: Just for clarification, the Emigrant Gap bird was not actively collected, but was salvaged after it was killed. The accession
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 24, 2002
                At 10:39 AM 12/24/2002 -0800, creagrus wrote:

                >I photographed that bird at Emigrant Ranger Station, Death Valley Nat'l
                >Park, California, on 17 Nov 1977. Until I read Kimball's post, I was
                >unaware that it had been collected 4 days later (by whom?; given the
                >date and place I presume these are the same birds). I have corresponded
                >with Peter Clement about my bird and the British vagrant which showed
                >similar characteristics and, if I am remembering right, there is a paper
                >on the British vagrant in "British Birds" magazine. I may have gotten
                >the word "schizochroism" from him.

                Don and Calbirders:

                Just for clarification, the Emigrant Gap bird was not actively collected,
                but was salvaged after it was killed. The accession information, by Donna
                P. Bessken (who salvaged the bird) and preparator Kathleen Baker, reads:
                "Observed bird for a couple of days around ERS. It was barely able to fly
                and dragged one wing on the ground as it hopped after insects. Bird was
                then killed by shrike." [For the record, I don't know what kind of shrike
                killed the thrush.]

                The term "schizochroism" may well be the correct one. I think I made up
                "anaurantic" (lacking orange) because it sounded good, but I prefer the
                more scientific term used in Law's note (the reference Jeff Davis
                provided): "orangeless".

                Kimball


                *****************************************************
                Kimball L. Garrett
                Ornithology Collections Manager
                Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
                900 Exposition Blvd.
                Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
                213-763-3368
                213-746-2999 FAX
                kgarrett@...
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