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Be on lookout for penguins

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  • Kimball Garrett
    Calbirders: If Humboldt Penguins can get to Alaska, they must surely come through California...... And note the speculation below that the bird might head
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 31, 2002
      Calbirders:

      If Humboldt Penguins can get to Alaska, they must surely
      come through California...... And note the speculation
      below that the bird might head south for the winter.

      See below from Alaska's Eaglechat [the photos referred to
      are, of course, not attached in this message]

      Kimball

      *****************************
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Steve Zimmerman
      Date: Monday, July 29, 2002 1:20 pm
      Subject: [Eaglechat] [Fwd: Penguin: small file sizes ...]

      > Hi, folks. Attached is a real mind-bender. The two files show an
      > apparent Humboldt Penguin that was caught in a fishing net off Noyes
      > Island. The pictures were sent to Kim Titus at ADF&G who called
      > me and
      > then forwarded the file. I don't know when the bird was caught--Kim
      > thought within the past couple of days. I believe the bird was
      > released
      > alive but details (assuming this is not a hoax) are sketchy at this
      > time. Steve Zimmerman


      Subject: Re:
      From: Tracy&Kim Rivera <ccfishc@...>
      Date: Mon, 29 Jul 2002 13:42:53 -0800

      Some more info on this bizarre incident......the bird showed up in the
      water within a purse seine net off of Noyes Island on July 18; the bird
      was released alive; and I guess, the bird really didn't want to leave!
      fishermen reported the bird was reluctant to go off the boat; I
      contacted Dr. Dee Boersma, a seabird researcher at the University of
      Washington (she researches Magellanic penguins in South America); she
      confirmed the ID as a Humboldt's; she said it is not uncommon at all
      down there for fishermen to keep these birds onboard as pets; her
      hypotheses is that the bird 'caught a ride' on some vessel to this
      hemisphere and then was released; she said it would have no problem
      surviving in these waters (similar temperature, forage, etc); she was
      pretty emphatic that the bird did not get here on its own;

      one other possibility is a released bird from a zoo or aquarium; but
      most birds in collections are somehow tagged and there was no report of
      any tagging on this bird

      I asked Dee how she thought this bird would fare in the winter; she
      said the only thing it might face is shortage of daylength, it's a
      diurnal forager and might not have enough daylight to forage....so she
      thought it might migrate, swim south.....

      very interesting!!!

      Listen on the radio for a story; Kim Titus got the report from a
      Ketchikan reporter; I referred Dee to call the reporter, which she did,
      and gave an extensive interview....so we might hear it on KTOO
      sometime???? the reporter is with KRBD, the Ketchikan station


      *****************************
      Kimball L. Garrett
      Ornithology Collections Manager
      Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
      900 Exposition Blvd.
      Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
      (213) 763-3368
      (213) 746-2999 FAX
      kgarrett@...
      *****************************
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