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Re: [CALBIRDS] Pattern of recent Blue-footed Booby records

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  • Daniel Sloan
    Perhaps it has something to with hurricane season ­ a hurricane in the Gulf, and a tropical storm in the Pacific (although the latter is pretty far south
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 14, 2013
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      Perhaps it has something to with hurricane season – a hurricane in the Gulf, and a tropical storm in the Pacific (although the latter is pretty far south right now, around Oaxaca). 

      Cheers,
      Dany Sloan
      LA, CA

      From: Ed Stonick <edstonick@...>
      Reply-To: Ed Stonick <edstonick@...>
      Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2013 17:24:56 -0700 (GMT-07:00)
      To: Kimball Garrett <kgarrett@...>, "calbirds@yahoogroups.com" <calbirds@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Pattern of recent Blue-footed Booby records

       

      Greetings!

      Thanks for the summary of observations Kimball.  I, too, wondered about the distribution of sightings but also why there are so many at once, when most years there are single birds or none at all.  Someone suggested extraordinary nesting success, as most of the birds seen are juveniles.  Could there also be a food problem down south driving the birds up north?

      Good birding,
      Ed

      Ed Stonick
      Pasadena, CA


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Kimball Garrett
      Sent: Sep 14, 2013 4:56 PM
      To: "calbirds@yahoogroups.com"
      Subject: [CALBIRDS] Pattern of recent Blue-footed Booby records

       

      Birders,

       

      In the past three days there have been at least 12 Blue-footed Boobies sighted at three coastal locations and three additional inland locations (5 to 15 miles from the ocean) just within Los Angeles County alone.  Add to these birds seen in the past few days on the lower Santa Ana River in Orange County, in coastal San Diego County at La Jolla, and well inland at Lake Skinner (5 birds) and Borrego Springs (plus a bird at Pt. Reyes), and it's clear there is a major "invasion" going on.  But, shockingly, there has yet to be a single report from the Salton Sea, and nearly every other past invasion involved multiples at the Sea and smaller numbers of individuals farther north and west (including on the coast).  I know that access to some areas of the Salton Sea has recently been limited by impassible roads due to rain and mud, but could anybody who has checked the Sea in the past couple of days please chime in on whether the absence of boobies there is real or just a function of coverage.  A route from the northern Gulf of California northwest through the Salton Sink and our deserts and on to the coastal slope seems to have been the norm in past booby events, but maybe this incursion has come up the west coast of Baja?

       

      Kimball

       

      Kimball L. Garrett

      Ornithology Collections Manager

      Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

      900 Exposition Blvd.

      Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

      213-763-3368

      kgarrett@...

      http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology

      Regards,
      Ed
      
      Ed Stonick
      Pasadena, CA
      edstonick@...

    • Christopher Taylor
      Dave Furseth just reported FIVE Blue-foots at Lake Skinner near Temecula. 1 adult and 4 juveniles. Since I m at my in-laws near Palm Springs, I might just hit
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 14, 2013
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        Dave Furseth just reported FIVE Blue-foots at Lake Skinner near
        Temecula. 1 adult and 4 juveniles. Since I'm at my in-laws near Palm
        Springs, I might just hit the Sea tomorrow!

        --
        Christopher Taylor
        Marina del Rey, CA
        http://kiwifoto.com



        -----Original Message-----
        From: Kimball Garrett [mailto:kgarrett@...]
        To calbirds@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, Sep 14, 2013 at 04:56 PM (PDT)
        Subject: [CALBIRDS] Pattern of recent Blue-footed Booby records [8.0K]
        Message-Id: <01086671FE110F4696ECE
        Birders,



        In the past three days there have been at least 12 Blue-footed Boobies sighted at three coastal locations and three additional inland locations (5 to 15 miles from the ocean) just within Los Angeles County alone. Add to these birds seen in the past few days on the lower Santa Ana River in Orange County, in coastal San Diego County at La Jolla, and well inland at Lake Skinner (5 birds) and Borrego Springs (plus a bird at Pt. Reyes), and it's clear there is a major "invasion" going on. But, shockingly, there has yet to be a single report from the Salton Sea, and nearly every other past invasion involved multiples at the Sea and smaller numbers of individuals farther north and west (including on the coast). I know that access to some areas of the Salton Sea has recently been limited by impassible roads due to rain and mud, but could anybody who has checked the Sea in the past couple of days please chime in on whether the absence of boobies there is real or just a function of coverage. A route from the northern Gulf of California northwest through the Salton Sink and our deserts and on to the coastal slope seems to have been the norm in past booby events, but maybe this incursion has come up the west coast of Baja?



        Kimball


        Kimball L. Garrett
        Ornithology Collections Manager
        Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
        900 Exposition Blvd.
        Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
        213-763-3368
        kgarrett@...
        http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
      • Jesse Ellis
        Another two individuals to consider are the one found in Lake Patagonia south of Tucson, Arizona, within the past few weeks, and one in Eastern New Mexico in
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 14, 2013
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          Another two individuals to consider are the one found in Lake Patagonia south of Tucson, Arizona, within the past few weeks, and one in Eastern New Mexico in mid August.

          If you zoom in on this map and limit it to the current year (http://tinyurl.com/2013boobies) you'll see both these individuals and the recent records around the LA Basin.

          Jesse Ellis
          West Los Angeles


          On Sat, Sep 14, 2013 at 5:24 PM, Ed Stonick <edstonick@...> wrote:
           

          Greetings!

          Thanks for the summary of observations Kimball.  I, too, wondered about the distribution of sightings but also why there are so many at once, when most years there are single birds or none at all.  Someone suggested extraordinary nesting success, as most of the birds seen are juveniles.  Could there also be a food problem down south driving the birds up north?

          Good birding,
          Ed

          Ed Stonick
          Pasadena, CA


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Kimball Garrett
          Sent: Sep 14, 2013 4:56 PM
          To: "calbirds@yahoogroups.com"
          Subject: [CALBIRDS] Pattern of recent Blue-footed Booby records

           

          Birders,

           

          In the past three days there have been at least 12 Blue-footed Boobies sighted at three coastal locations and three additional inland locations (5 to 15 miles from the ocean) just within Los Angeles County alone.  Add to these birds seen in the past few days on the lower Santa Ana River in Orange County, in coastal San Diego County at La Jolla, and well inland at Lake Skinner (5 birds) and Borrego Springs (plus a bird at Pt. Reyes), and it's clear there is a major "invasion" going on.  But, shockingly, there has yet to be a single report from the Salton Sea, and nearly every other past invasion involved multiples at the Sea and smaller numbers of individuals farther north and west (including on the coast).  I know that access to some areas of the Salton Sea has recently been limited by impassible roads due to rain and mud, but could anybody who has checked the Sea in the past couple of days please chime in on whether the absence of boobies there is real or just a function of coverage.  A route from the northern Gulf of California northwest through the Salton Sink and our deserts and on to the coastal slope seems to have been the norm in past booby events, but maybe this incursion has come up the west coast of Baja?

           

          Kimball

           

          Kimball L. Garrett

          Ornithology Collections Manager

          Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

          900 Exposition Blvd.

          Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

          213-763-3368

          kgarrett@...

          http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology

          Regards,
          Ed
          
          Ed Stonick
          Pasadena, CA
          edstonick@...




          --
          Jesse Ellis
          Post-doctoral Researcher
          Dept. of Integrative and Comparative Biology,
          UCLA
        • Kristie Nelson
          Just to follow up about the question of inland (Salton Sea) records - and to add another to the bunch...There was a Blue-footed Booby at Mono Lake on Aug. 25
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 15, 2013
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            Just to follow up about the question of inland (Salton Sea) records - and to add another to the bunch...
            There was a Blue-footed Booby at Mono Lake on Aug. 25 (I believe this would have been the first record of this pulse?).

            Very unfortunately, though, the photos of it are not available. Story was, Mono Lake Committee intern Max Henkels was leading the early evening naturalist walk at Mono Lake's south tufa reserve. Some tourists on his walk showed him photos on their digital camera of this strange bird that that they saw at Navy Beach earlier that afternoon - and wondered if he knew what it was. He said it was an obvious Blue-footed Booby standing on the shoreline of Mono Lake (and even zoomed the image up on the feet - Must've been nice pictures...). Unfortunately, he did not get their contact information to obtain copies of the photos, but I think the record is good, especially considering the invasion which has followed. 


            - Kristie


            To: calbirds@yahoogroups.com
            From: kgarrett@...
            Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2013 23:56:37 +0000
            Subject: [CALBIRDS] Pattern of recent Blue-footed Booby records



            Birders,
             
            In the past three days there have been at least 12 Blue-footed Boobies sighted at three coastal locations and three additional inland locations (5 to 15 miles from the ocean) just within Los Angeles County alone.  Add to these birds seen in the past few days on the lower Santa Ana River in Orange County, in coastal San Diego County at La Jolla, and well inland at Lake Skinner (5 birds) and Borrego Springs (plus a bird at Pt. Reyes), and it's clear there is a major "invasion" going on.  But, shockingly, there has yet to be a single report from the Salton Sea, and nearly every other past invasion involved multiples at the Sea and smaller numbers of individuals farther north and west (including on the coast).  I know that access to some areas of the Salton Sea has recently been limited by impassible roads due to rain and mud, but could anybody who has checked the Sea in the past couple of days please chime in on whether the absence of boobies there is real or just a function of coverage.  A route from the northern Gulf of California northwest through the Salton Sink and our deserts and on to the coastal slope seems to have been the norm in past booby events, but maybe this incursion has come up the west coast of Baja?
             
            Kimball
             

            Kimball L. Garrett

            Ornithology Collections Manager

            Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

            900 Exposition Blvd.

            Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

            213-763-3368

            kgarrett@...

            http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology



          • Chet McGaugh
            Good nudge from Kimball. I (and perhaps others?) did a booby search around the north end of the Salton Sea today, Sept 15, checking many of the likely spots,
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 15, 2013
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              Good nudge from Kimball.  I (and perhaps others?) did a booby search around the north end of the Salton Sea today, Sept 15, checking many of the likely spots, but NOT the most likely spot. Nudge. A lovely day of course, pelican and herons to  the extreme. Noticing that the gulls are all on the west side, and the big dark ones are scarce. I had thought that the summer Red-breasted Merganser flock at 81st was declining, burt all nine were present today. The Black Tern swarm of late was down to a single. Salt Creek remains "closed for the season" as does Corvina Beach and Mecca Beach.
              Chet




               
              -----Original Message-----
              From: Kimball Garrett
              Sent: Sep 14, 2013 4:56 PM
              To: "calbirds@yahoogroups.com"
              Subject: [CALBIRDS] Pattern of recent Blue-footed Booby records

               

              Birders,

               

              In the past three days there have been at least 12 Blue-footed Boobies sighted at three coastal locations and three additional inland locations (5 to 15 miles from the ocean) just within Los Angeles County alone.  Add to these birds seen in the past few days on the lower Santa Ana River in Orange County, in coastal San Diego County at La Jolla, and well inland at Lake Skinner (5 birds) and Borrego Springs (plus a bird at Pt. Reyes), and it's clear there is a major "invasion" going on.  But, shockingly, there has yet to be a single report from the Salton Sea, and nearly every other past invasion involved multiples at the Sea and smaller numbers of individuals farther north and west (including on the coast).  I know that access to some areas of the Salton Sea has recently been limited by impassible roads due to rain and mud, but could anybody who has checked the Sea in the past couple of days please chime in on whether the absence of boobies there is real or just a function of coverage.  A route from the northern Gulf of California northwest through the Salton Sink and our deserts and on to the coastal slope seems to have been the norm in past booby events, but maybe this incursion has come up the west coast of Baja?

               

              Kimball

               

              Kimball L. Garrett

              Ornithology Collections Manager

              Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

              900 Exposition Blvd.

              Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

              213-763-3368

              kgarrett@...

              http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology

            • Brian Sullivan
              Kimball et al. Add at least one more to the list. Found at Pt. Pinos this evening: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15182930 Thanks Brian ... --
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 15, 2013
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                Kimball et al.

                Add at least one more to the list. Found at Pt. Pinos this evening:

                http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15182930

                Thanks

                Brian


                On Sat, Sep 14, 2013 at 4:56 PM, Kimball Garrett <kgarrett@...> wrote:
                 

                Birders,

                 

                In the past three days there have been at least 12 Blue-footed Boobies sighted at three coastal locations and three additional inland locations (5 to 15 miles from the ocean) just within Los Angeles County alone.  Add to these birds seen in the past few days on the lower Santa Ana River in Orange County, in coastal San Diego County at La Jolla, and well inland at Lake Skinner (5 birds) and Borrego Springs (plus a bird at Pt. Reyes), and it's clear there is a major "invasion" going on.  But, shockingly, there has yet to be a single report from the Salton Sea, and nearly every other past invasion involved multiples at the Sea and smaller numbers of individuals farther north and west (including on the coast).  I know that access to some areas of the Salton Sea has recently been limited by impassible roads due to rain and mud, but could anybody who has checked the Sea in the past couple of days please chime in on whether the absence of boobies there is real or just a function of coverage.  A route from the northern Gulf of California northwest through the Salton Sink and our deserts and on to the coastal slope seems to have been the norm in past booby events, but maybe this incursion has come up the west coast of Baja?

                 

                Kimball

                 

                Kimball L. Garrett

                Ornithology Collections Manager

                Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

                900 Exposition Blvd.

                Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

                213-763-3368

                kgarrett@...

                http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology




                --
                ===========
                Brian L. Sullivan

                eBird Project Leader

                www.ebird.org

                Photo Editor
                Birds of North America Online
                http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
                -------------------------------
              • natureali
                A quick trip to Obsidian Butte in Salton Sea revealed 39 Blue-footed Boobies = 33 on one rock alone. Ran into a friend who had been circumnavigating the sea
                Message 7 of 9 , Oct 7, 2013
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                  A quick trip to Obsidian Butte in Salton Sea revealed 39 Blue-footed Boobies = 33 on one rock alone. Ran into a friend who had been circumnavigating the sea and his count was up to 103 from Riverside County down the west side and he was working his way north on the east side when I saw him.

                  Some of the boobies displayed yellow in their feet, but nothing lead me to think they were any other species. https://www.flickr.com/photos/natureali/10149387836/


                  Ali Sheehey

                  Weldon, CA




                  ---In calbirds@yahoogroups.com, <heraldpetrel@...> wrote:

                  Kimball et al.

                  Add at least one more to the list. Found at Pt. Pinos this evening:

                  http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15182930

                  Thanks

                  Brian


                  On Sat, Sep 14, 2013 at 4:56 PM, Kimball Garrett <kgarrett@...> wrote:
                   

                  Birders,

                   

                  In the past three days there have been at least 12 Blue-footed Boobies sighted at three coastal locations and three additional inland locations (5 to 15 miles from the ocean) just within Los Angeles County alone.  Add to these birds seen in the past few days on the lower Santa Ana River in Orange County, in coastal San Diego County at La Jolla, and well inland at Lake Skinner (5 birds) and Borrego Springs (plus a bird at Pt. Reyes), and it's clear there is a major "invasion" going on.  But, shockingly, there has yet to be a single report from the Salton Sea, and nearly every other past invasion involved multiples at the Sea and smaller numbers of individuals farther north and west (including on the coast).  I know that access to some areas of the Salton Sea has recently been limited by impassible roads due to rain and mud, but could anybody who has checked the Sea in the past couple of days please chime in on whether the absence of boobies there is real or just a function of coverage.  A route from the northern Gulf of California northwest through the Salton Sink and our deserts and on to the coastal slope seems to have been the norm in past booby events, but maybe this incursion has come up the west coast of Baja?

                   

                  Kimball

                   

                  Kimball L. Garrett

                  Ornithology Collections Manager

                  Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

                  900 Exposition Blvd.

                  Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

                  213-763-3368

                  kgarrett@...

                  http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology




                  --
                  ===========
                  Brian L. Sullivan

                  eBird Project Leader

                  www.ebird.org

                  Photo Editor
                  Birds of North America Online
                  http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
                  -------------------------------
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