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Sagebrush Sparrow in California

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  • Ed Stonick
    Greetings! I ve been following the discussion of the new split, including Kimball s discussion re. L. A. County. I m wondering about the rest of the state.
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 12 5:58 AM
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      Greetings!

      I've been following the discussion of the new split, including Kimball's discussion re. L. A. County. I'm wondering about the rest of the state. From what I've pieced together, it seems that Bell's Sparrow is the only one that nests in California, and that Sagebrush Sparrow nests in the Great Basin but may winter in California but probably away from the coast. Now that many birders are also photographers, there should be plenty of data on the new species in the months to come.

      Good birding,
      Ed

      Ed Stonick
      Pasadena, CA
      edstonick@...

      Regards,
      Ed

      Ed Stonick
      Pasadena, CA
      edstonick@...
    • Bruce Webb
      Ed: A correction to your statement below about Bell s sparrow is only one that nests in California. As you know, vast tracts of Great Basin occur in
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 12 8:09 AM
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        Ed:

        A correction to your statement below about Bell's sparrow is only one
        that nests in California. As you know, vast tracts of Great Basin occur
        in northeastern California. So, the newly named Sagebrush Sparrow
        (nevadensis) breeds in California -- in eastern Lassen and Modoc
        counties and also apparently near Bishop, California.

        A useful range map and links to audio files to our recently departed
        friends -- the now, nomenclaturally extirpated "Sage Sparrows" can be
        found here:

        http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3040

        The difficulty birders face iduring migration and overwintering
        situations is discerning the typically pale Sagebrush Sparrow
        Artemisiospiza nevadensis from similarly pale Bell's Sparrow -
        Artemisiospiza belli canescens .

        Photos of singing adult birds we usually find online are nice, but adult
        birds in worn plumage and juveniles will help get a better handle on
        their identification away from breeding locations. A challenge to
        photographers: A better series of photos of canescens in the heart of
        its Atriplex habitat in the Central Valley would be very useful.

        A lively discussion of this has been on the very active Central Valley
        Birds listserv. Even non-subscribers can follow it here:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/central_valley_birds/message/17779

        --
        Bruce Webb
        Granite Bay, CA




        On 8/12/2013 8:58 AM, Ed Stonick wrote:
        > Greetings!
        >
        > I've been following the discussion of the new split, including Kimball's discussion re. L. A. County. I'm wondering about the rest of the state. From what I've pieced together, it seems that Bell's Sparrow is the only one that nests in California, and that Sagebrush Sparrow nests in the Great Basin but may winter in California but probably away from the coast. Now that many birders are also photographers, there should be plenty of data on the new species in the months to come.
        >
        > Good birding,
        > Ed
        >
        > Ed Stonick
        > Pasadena, CA
        > edstonick@...
        >
        > Regards,
        > Ed
        >
        > Ed Stonick
        > Pasadena, CA
        > edstonick@...
        >
        >
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      • John Sterling
        Sagebrush Sparrows do nest in CA locally from Modoc County south to Mono and maybe northern Inyo counties. Not sure if photographs will help positively
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 12 8:37 AM
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          Sagebrush Sparrows do nest in CA locally from Modoc County south to Mono and maybe northern Inyo counties.

          Not sure if photographs will help positively identify Sagebrush from canescens Bell's Sparrows.


          John Sterling
          VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

          26 Palm Ave
          Woodland, CA 95695
          530 908-3836
          jsterling@...
          www.sterlingbirds.com

          On Aug 12, 2013, at 5:58 AM, Ed Stonick <edstonick@...> wrote:

          > Greetings!
          >
          > I've been following the discussion of the new split, including Kimball's discussion re. L. A. County. I'm wondering about the rest of the state. From what I've pieced together, it seems that Bell's Sparrow is the only one that nests in California, and that Sagebrush Sparrow nests in the Great Basin but may winter in California but probably away from the coast. Now that many birders are also photographers, there should be plenty of data on the new species in the months to come.
          >
          > Good birding,
          > Ed
          >
          > Ed Stonick
          > Pasadena, CA
          > edstonick@...
          >
          > Regards,
          > Ed
          >
          > Ed Stonick
          > Pasadena, CA
          > edstonick@...
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jamie Chavez
          Coincidentally, I posted to the Santa Barbara list Saturday regarding Bell s and Sagebrush Sparrows and linked to a series of photos of a bird I photographed
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 12 9:14 AM
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            Coincidentally, I posted to the Santa Barbara list Saturday regarding
            Bell's and Sagebrush Sparrows and linked to a series of photos of a bird I
            photographed in 2006 on the central coast which may have been nevadensis. I
            would welcome comments from those in the know. Apologies beforehand if the
            links in my sbcobirding post aren't instantaneously functional but you can
            copy and paste into your browser...

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sbcobirding/message/19705
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sbcobirding/message/19706

            --
            Jamie Chavez
            Santa Maria, CA
            http://www.sbcobirding.com/



            On Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 8:09 AM, Bruce Webb <BruWebb@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > Ed:
            >
            > A correction to your statement below about Bell's sparrow is only one
            > that nests in California. As you know, vast tracts of Great Basin occur
            > in northeastern California. So, the newly named Sagebrush Sparrow
            > (nevadensis) breeds in California -- in eastern Lassen and Modoc
            > counties and also apparently near Bishop, California.
            >
            > A useful range map and links to audio files to our recently departed
            > friends -- the now, nomenclaturally extirpated "Sage Sparrows" can be
            > found here:
            >
            > http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3040
            >
            > The difficulty birders face iduring migration and overwintering
            > situations is discerning the typically pale Sagebrush Sparrow
            > Artemisiospiza nevadensis from similarly pale Bell's Sparrow -
            > Artemisiospiza belli canescens .
            >
            > Photos of singing adult birds we usually find online are nice, but adult
            > birds in worn plumage and juveniles will help get a better handle on
            > their identification away from breeding locations. A challenge to
            > photographers: A better series of photos of canescens in the heart of
            > its Atriplex habitat in the Central Valley would be very useful.
            >
            > A lively discussion of this has been on the very active Central Valley
            > Birds listserv. Even non-subscribers can follow it here:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/central_valley_birds/message/17779
            >
            > --
            > Bruce Webb
            > Granite Bay, CA
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • borodayko2000
            I decided I might as well join the fray and seek opinions as well. I photographed Sage Sparrows at two locations. One was along Petrolium Club Road near Taft
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 12 2:57 PM
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              I decided I might as well join the fray and seek opinions as well. I photographed Sage Sparrows at two locations.

              One was along Petrolium Club Road near Taft in Apr 1995. I would not consider it coastal so I assume it is of the A. belli canescens subspecie.

              The other two photos were taken at Galileo Hill in Nov 1989. They may or may not be two different birds but I favor different based on some of the color pattern. Which are these A. belli canescens or nevadensis?

              I never dreamed I'd have to decide.

              The photos Sage Sparrow (belli or canescens) and Sage Sparrow (canescens or nevedensis) are posted in the Sparrows folder and can be viewed temporarily in the new photos folder.

              Regards, Al Borodayko
              Cypress, CA



              --- In CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com, Jamie Chavez <almiyi@...> wrote:
              >
              > Coincidentally, I posted to the Santa Barbara list Saturday regarding
              > Bell's and Sagebrush Sparrows and linked to a series of photos of a bird I
              > photographed in 2006 on the central coast which may have been nevadensis. I
              > would welcome comments from those in the know. Apologies beforehand
            • borodayko2000
              After reviewing the Peter Pyle article in Sibley guide (link below), I have come to a tentative conclusion that the two sparrows I photographed at Galileo Hill
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 20 1:05 PM
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                After reviewing the Peter Pyle article in Sibley guide (link below), I have come to a tentative conclusion that the two sparrows I photographed at Galileo Hill were a Bell's (canescens) and a Sagebrush Sparrow (nevadensis). See Sparrows folder.

                2a-0006_1: stronger malar / weak back streaking /no underpart streaking ergo BELL'S (canescens)

                2b-0007_1: weaker malar / more distinct back streaking / some underpart streaking ergo SAGEBRUSH (nevadensis)

                http://www.sibleyguides.com/wp-content/uploads/On-separating-Sagebrush-and-Bells-Sparrows.pdf

                The one I photographed (1-0005_1) near Taft is a Bell's conescens since that is one of their nesting areas and it is nesting time.

                Comments and denouncements appreciated.

                Al Borodayko
                Cypress, CA

                >
                > The photos Sage Sparrow (belli or canescens) and Sage Sparrow (canescens or nevedensis) are posted in the Sparrows folder and can be viewed temporarily in the new photos folder.
                >
                > Regards, Al Borodayko
                > Cypress, CA
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