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Re: [CALBIRDS] Short article on song playback

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  • Joseph Morlan
    Jim, The full article is at.... http://news.yahoo.com/smartphone-apps-may-killing-birds-175205275.html At latest count this article generated 121 comments and
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 16 7:12 PM
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      Jim,

      The full article is at....

      http://news.yahoo.com/smartphone-apps-may-killing-birds-175205275.html

      At latest count this article generated 121 comments and a thread on the
      Carolina Birds email list in which Mike Tove claimed that studies on song
      playback have shown it does no harm.

      http://birding.aba.org/message.php?mesid=461541&MLID=NzC&MLNM=North%20and%20South%20Carolina

      I'm not sure which studies Tove is referencing in his mention of "Multiple
      studies on passerine reaction dating back to the 1970's." It would be very
      interesting to get actual citations.

      In 2011, David Sibley posted on this subject in his blog...

      http://www.sibleyguides.com/2011/04/the-proper-use-of-playback-in-birding/

      Sibley claims there is no concrete evidence either way.


      On Mon, 17 Jun 2013 01:39:23 -0000, "Jim" <jpike44@...> wrote:

      >Hi,
      >
      >The Orange County Register includes an interesting section called "Earthweek: A Diary of the Planet" on Sundays. Today's edition includes a snippet that seems relevant to the current birding scene, and worthy of consideration:
      >
      >"Birdwatchers who play back birdsongs on their smartphones to attract wild birds can stop the winged creatures from performing important tasks like feeding their young, experts warn. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) says it is receiving more reports of people playing birdsong recordings so they can photograph birds or observe them up close. "It is selfish and shows no respect to the bird. People should never use playback to attract a species during its breeding season," said southern Wales RSPB spokesman Tony Whitehead. Bird expert Chris Thain told the BBC that people would be "devastated" if they realized how much harm the use of the apps can cause to wildlife.
      >
      >Jim Pike
      >HB
      --
      Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
      "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt
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