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Re: [CALBIRDS] Sparrow Identification

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  • Steve Hampton
    The coloration of the head suggests Lincoln s, but the unmarked white vent is all wrong for it, as well as the brown streaking against white underparts. It
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 2 10:24 PM
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      The coloration of the head suggests Lincoln's, but the unmarked white vent
      is all wrong for it, as well as the brown streaking against white
      underparts. It must be a desert version of a Song Sparrow.



      On Sat, Feb 2, 2013 at 10:11 PM, Bob & Carol Yutzy <boby@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > Look clearly like either a Lincoln's Sparrow with the buffy malars or
      > possibly a Song Sparrow to me.
      >
      > Bob Yutzy
      > Shasta, CA
      >
      > Hello Everyone,
      >
      > I spent some time in late December birding the Salton Sea and other parts
      > of Southern California. Being fairly inexperienced with sparrows I wanted
      > some input on what the bird might be... My best guess would be a Vesper
      > Sparrow.
      >
      > Any help would be much appreciated!
      >
      > Gerald Sylvester
      >
      > http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsnaturephotography/8437617878/in/photostream
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > �
      >
      > --
      > Bob & Carol Yutzy
      > Shasta, CA
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Steve Hampton
      Davis, CA


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jim
      Noting that virtually everyone on this site would know which species this was after experiencing it for just a few seconds in the field, I think the
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 3 1:16 AM
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        Noting that virtually everyone on this site would know which species this was after experiencing it for just a few seconds in the field, I think the combination of a distinct eyering, grayish supercilium, and creamy sub-moustachial stripe is leading folks astray. I have to agree with Dinuk and Doug that this is a Savannah Sparrow. The dingy ochraceous coloration in the supraloral area and the short tail wouldn't be found on a Song Sparrow. Further, if it was a Song Sparrow, per Patten et al.(2003), there are only 2 or 3 candidate subspecies likely to be found around the Salton Sea in winter. The least common is the attractive M. m. montana, which I see with some regularity in the Mojave desert in fall, and which this bird doesn't fit. It certainly doesn't look like the second most common subspecies, the cold, dark M. m. heermanni, which breeds in the Coachella Valley and throughout cismontane southern California. That only leaves the most common, M. m. fallax, but that would have strikingly rusty facial and malar stripes, rusty greater coverts, and rusty ventral streaks, plus a long tail, all of which this bird lacks.

        Jim Pike
        HB


        --- In CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com, Steve Hampton wrote:
        >
        > The coloration of the head suggests Lincoln's, but the unmarked white vent
        > is all wrong for it, as well as the brown streaking against white
        > underparts. It must be a desert version of a Song Sparrow.
        >
        >
        >
        > On Sat, Feb 2, 2013 at 10:11 PM, Bob & Carol Yutzy wrote:
        >
        > > **
        > >
        > >
        > > Look clearly like either a Lincoln's Sparrow with the buffy malars or
        > > possibly a Song Sparrow to me.
        > >
        > > Bob Yutzy
        > > Shasta, CA
        > >
        > > Hello Everyone,
        > >
        > > I spent some time in late December birding the Salton Sea and other parts
        > > of Southern California. Being fairly inexperienced with sparrows I wanted
        > > some input on what the bird might be... My best guess would be a Vesper
        > > Sparrow.
        > >
        > > Any help would be much appreciated!
        > >
        > > Gerald Sylvester
        > >
        > > http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsnaturephotography/8437617878/in/photostream
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > > Â
        > >
        > > --
        > > Bob & Carol Yutzy
        > > Shasta, CA
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Steve Hampton
        > Davis, CA
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Ali Sheehey
        Absolutely agree this is a Savannah Sparrow. The lore is yellow when the image is blown up. All other characteristics are consistent with that species. Yours
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 3 5:53 AM
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          Absolutely agree this is a Savannah Sparrow. The lore is yellow when the image is blown up. All other characteristics are consistent with that species.

          Yours in nature,

          Ali

          Alison Sheehey
          PO Box 153
          Weldon, CA 93283

          natureali@...
          www.natureali.org
          www.flickr.com/photos/natureali
          760-417-0268

          On Feb 3, 2013, at 1:16 AM, "Jim" <jpike44@...> wrote:

          >
          > Noting that virtually everyone on this site would know which species this was after experiencing it for just a few seconds in the field, I think the combination of a distinct eyering, grayish supercilium, and creamy sub-moustachial stripe is leading folks astray. I have to agree with Dinuk and Doug that this is a Savannah Sparrow. The dingy ochraceous coloration in the supraloral area and the short tail wouldn't be found on a Song Sparrow. Further, if it was a Song Sparrow, per Patten et al.(2003), there are only 2 or 3 candidate subspecies likely to be found around the Salton Sea in winter. The least common is the attractive M. m. montana, which I see with some regularity in the Mojave desert in fall, and which this bird doesn't fit. It certainly doesn't look like the second most common subspecies, the cold, dark M. m. heermanni, which breeds in the Coachella Valley and throughout cismontane southern California. That only leaves the most common, M. m. fallax, but that would have strikingly rusty facial and malar stripes, rusty greater coverts, and rusty ventral streaks, plus a long tail, all of which this bird lacks.
          >
          > Jim Pike
          > HB
          >
          > --- In CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com, Steve Hampton wrote:
          > >
          > > The coloration of the head suggests Lincoln's, but the unmarked white vent
          > > is all wrong for it, as well as the brown streaking against white
          > > underparts. It must be a desert version of a Song Sparrow.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > On Sat, Feb 2, 2013 at 10:11 PM, Bob & Carol Yutzy wrote:
          > >
          > > > **
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Look clearly like either a Lincoln's Sparrow with the buffy malars or
          > > > possibly a Song Sparrow to me.
          > > >
          > > > Bob Yutzy
          > > > Shasta, CA
          > > >
          > > > Hello Everyone,
          > > >
          > > > I spent some time in late December birding the Salton Sea and other parts
          > > > of Southern California. Being fairly inexperienced with sparrows I wanted
          > > > some input on what the bird might be... My best guess would be a Vesper
          > > > Sparrow.
          > > >
          > > > Any help would be much appreciated!
          > > >
          > > > Gerald Sylvester
          > > >
          > > > http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsnaturephotography/8437617878/in/photostream
          >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Bruce Mast
          The tip of the tail is partially obscured by a blurred branch but it appears to be notched, which would further support Savannah and rule out either of the
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 3 8:48 AM
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            The tip of the tail is partially obscured by a blurred branch but it appears
            to be notched, which would further support Savannah and rule out either of
            the Melospizas.

            Bruce Mast
            Oakland

            -----Original Message-----
            From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            Of Ali Sheehey
            Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 5:54 AM
            To: Jim
            Cc: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] Re: Sparrow Identification

            Absolutely agree this is a Savannah Sparrow. The lore is yellow when the
            image is blown up. All other characteristics are consistent with that
            species.

            Yours in nature,

            Ali

            Alison Sheehey
            PO Box 153
            Weldon, CA 93283

            natureali@...
            www.natureali.org
            www.flickr.com/photos/natureali
            760-417-0268

            On Feb 3, 2013, at 1:16 AM, "Jim" <jpike44@...> wrote:

            >
            > Noting that virtually everyone on this site would know which species this
            was after experiencing it for just a few seconds in the field, I think the
            combination of a distinct eyering, grayish supercilium, and creamy
            sub-moustachial stripe is leading folks astray. I have to agree with Dinuk
            and Doug that this is a Savannah Sparrow. The dingy ochraceous coloration in
            the supraloral area and the short tail wouldn't be found on a Song Sparrow.
            Further, if it was a Song Sparrow, per Patten et al.(2003), there are only 2
            or 3 candidate subspecies likely to be found around the Salton Sea in
            winter. The least common is the attractive M. m. montana, which I see with
            some regularity in the Mojave desert in fall, and which this bird doesn't
            fit. It certainly doesn't look like the second most common subspecies, the
            cold, dark M. m. heermanni, which breeds in the Coachella Valley and
            throughout cismontane southern California. That only leaves the most common,
            M. m. fallax, but that would have strikingly rusty facial and malar stripes,
            rusty greater coverts, and rusty ventral streaks, plus a long tail, all of
            which this bird lacks.
            >
            > Jim Pike
            > HB
            >
            > --- In CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com, Steve Hampton wrote:
            > >
            > > The coloration of the head suggests Lincoln's, but the unmarked
            > > white vent is all wrong for it, as well as the brown streaking
            > > against white underparts. It must be a desert version of a Song Sparrow.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > On Sat, Feb 2, 2013 at 10:11 PM, Bob & Carol Yutzy wrote:
            > >
            > > > **
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Look clearly like either a Lincoln's Sparrow with the buffy malars
            > > > or possibly a Song Sparrow to me.
            > > >
            > > > Bob Yutzy
            > > > Shasta, CA
            > > >
            > > > Hello Everyone,
            > > >
            > > > I spent some time in late December birding the Salton Sea and
            > > > other parts of Southern California. Being fairly inexperienced
            > > > with sparrows I wanted some input on what the bird might be... My
            > > > best guess would be a Vesper Sparrow.
            > > >
            > > > Any help would be much appreciated!
            > > >
            > > > Gerald Sylvester
            > > >
            > > > http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsnaturephotography/8437617878/in/pho
            > > > tostream
            >
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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