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native substitute for eucalyptus?

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  • Steve Hampton
    I m currently involved in a suburban riparian restoration project (in Davis, Sacramento Valley) where they want to remove some eucalyptus trees that are
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 15, 2013
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      I'm currently involved in a suburban riparian restoration project (in
      Davis, Sacramento Valley) where they want to remove some eucalyptus trees
      that are dripping with Yellow Warblers and other migrants eating lerps in
      late summer and with hummingbirds, Yellow-rumped and Orange-cr Warblers,
      and even a Western Tanager at the flowers thru the winter.

      They are willing to replace them with natives that provide the same
      services. The only native I'm aware of is bladderpod (very difficult to
      propagate), which blooms in the winter and provides a food source for
      Anna's Hummingbirds. Any other suggestions?

      much appreciated,

      --
      Steve Hampton
      Davis, CA


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jeff Davis
      Hi Steve, I don t think you ll find a plant native to the valley that matches the ecological function and value of eucalyptus for the species you mentioned.
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 16, 2013
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        Hi Steve,

        I don't think you'll find a plant native to the valley that matches the ecological function and value of eucalyptus for the species you mentioned. Regardless, Anna's Hummers are thought to have co-evolved with fuchsia-flowered gooseberry (Ribes speciosum) in California. This relationship is theorized to be the reason why Anna's originally became year-round residents and routinely begin breeding in December. This plant is normally distributed in the low foothills of the Coast Range and southern California mountains, from the Bay Area to the Mexico border. The species is readily cultivated, but I'm not sure how it would do in Davis. You might look into other species of Ribes as well. One that is fairly common in riparian areas on the valley floor is golden currant (Ribes aureum), but it flowers in spring. Many manzanitas also flower in winter, but none are native to the valley.

        Jeff Davis
        Fresno, CA

        On Jan 15, 2013, at 11:39 PM, Steve Hampton <stevechampton@...> wrote:

        > I'm currently involved in a suburban riparian restoration project (in
        > Davis, Sacramento Valley) where they want to remove some eucalyptus trees
        > that are dripping with Yellow Warblers and other migrants eating lerps in
        > late summer and with hummingbirds, Yellow-rumped and Orange-cr Warblers,
        > and even a Western Tanager at the flowers thru the winter.
        >
        > They are willing to replace them with natives that provide the same
        > services. The only native I'm aware of is bladderpod (very difficult to
        > propagate), which blooms in the winter and provides a food source for
        > Anna's Hummingbirds. Any other suggestions?
        >
        > much appreciated,
        >
        > --
        > Steve Hampton
        > Davis, CA
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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