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Gray Hawk vagrancy and winter occurrence

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  • lehman.paul@verizon.net
    In case anyone s interested, here s what I could quickly dig up--with the help of several experts in the Southwest and elsewhere--on Gray Hawk vagrancy in the
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 28, 2012
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      In case anyone's interested, here's what I could quickly dig up--with the
      help of several experts in the Southwest and elsewhere--on Gray Hawk
      vagrancy in the U.S. (and Mexico), plus some brief comments on winter
      occurrence. [Though first off, I'd like to mention that this species' name
      is Gray Hawk, not "Grey" Hawk, which has been unfortunately used in some
      publications to maintain British spelling for a bunch of species that occur
      solely in the New World....] Anyway, Gray Hawk is certainly not a species
      with a long record of long-distance vagrancy, and it was probably NOT on
      many people's short-list of the next several species to turn up in
      California! Some "vagrant" records slightly to the north of the species'
      normal range in AZ, NM, and TX may better be termed--to quote Mark
      Stevenson--as short-distance overshoots, adventurers, or potential
      colonizers, and indeed this species has recently spread as a nesting
      species (involving isolated, semi-sporadic pairs) to south-central AZ, se.
      NM, and w. TX. Going farther out than that, there are several records from
      the greater Prescott region in northern AZ. And beyond that, there are at
      least 3 records of true long-distance vagrants:

      Kansas: adult in April 1990 at Milford Reservoir, Geary County, which was
      a sight-record only by multiple observers, so put on state's hypothetical
      list; but this was followed by an adult photo'd in Wichita in Oct 2005.

      Baja: an adult photo'd in southern Baja California Sur on 30 Oct 2010.

      There is also a report from 1871 in Illinois.....

      The Kansas records committee originally declined to accept the first
      record--without a photo--also because of the belief that the bird might be
      an escape from a falconer; but later research suggested that this species
      is not kept by falconers, at least not at all regularly.

      As for late fall and winter occurrence, this species is rare but somewhat
      regular then in the Lower Rio Grande Valley in s. TX. But in AZ, it is
      casual in winter. One such winter bird in se. AZ is an adult that has
      returned for many years to an off-ramp area along I-19 at Amado, south of
      Green Valley, in an open-country, non-riparian, highway-edge situation
      (ranchland with scattered mesquite) somewhat reminiscent of where this
      current Carpinteria highway bird is hanging out!!

      --Paul Lehman, San Diego


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    • Chet Ogan
      Hi Paul: So does this mean that CBRC will be unlikely to accept this well photographed bird?  What records show up for young Gray Hawks that may have escaped
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 28, 2012
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        Hi Paul:
        So does this mean that CBRC will be unlikely to accept this well photographed bird?  What records show up for young Gray Hawks that may have escaped from zoos or private aviaries?  Are any Gray Hawks being kept by California zoos?  
         
        When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe.
        -John Muir 

        Chet Ogan
        oganc@...
        707-442-9353 home
        707-496-9001 cell


        ________________________________
        From: "lehman.paul@..." <lehman.paul@...>
        To: calbirds@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 11:37 AM
        Subject: [CALBIRDS] Gray Hawk vagrancy and winter occurrence


         
        In case anyone's interested, here's what I could quickly dig up--with the
        help of several experts in the Southwest and elsewhere--on Gray Hawk
        vagrancy in the U.S. (and Mexico), plus some brief comments on winter
        occurrence. [Though first off, I'd like to mention that this species' name
        is Gray Hawk, not "Grey" Hawk, which has been unfortunately used in some
        publications to maintain British spelling for a bunch of species that occur
        solely in the New World....] Anyway, Gray Hawk is certainly not a species
        with a long record of long-distance vagrancy, and it was probably NOT on
        many people's short-list of the next several species to turn up in
        California! Some "vagrant" records slightly to the north of the species'
        normal range in AZ, NM, and TX may better be termed--to quote Mark
        Stevenson--as short-distance overshoots, adventurers, or potential
        colonizers, and indeed this species has recently spread as a nesting
        species (involving isolated, semi-sporadic pairs) to south-central AZ, se.
        NM, and w. TX. Going farther out than that, there are several records from
        the greater Prescott region in northern AZ. And beyond that, there are at
        least 3 records of true long-distance vagrants:

        Kansas: adult in April 1990 at Milford Reservoir, Geary County, which was
        a sight-record only by multiple observers, so put on state's hypothetical
        list; but this was followed by an adult photo'd in Wichita in Oct 2005.

        Baja: an adult photo'd in southern Baja California Sur on 30 Oct 2010.

        There is also a report from 1871 in Illinois.....

        The Kansas records committee originally declined to accept the first
        record--without a photo--also because of the belief that the bird might be
        an escape from a falconer; but later research suggested that this species
        is not kept by falconers, at least not at all regularly.

        As for late fall and winter occurrence, this species is rare but somewhat
        regular then in the Lower Rio Grande Valley in s. TX. But in AZ, it is
        casual in winter. One such winter bird in se. AZ is an adult that has
        returned for many years to an off-ramp area along I-19 at Amado, south of
        Green Valley, in an open-country, non-riparian, highway-edge situation
        (ranchland with scattered mesquite) somewhat reminiscent of where this
        current Carpinteria highway bird is hanging out!!

        --Paul Lehman, San Diego

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        mail2web.com - Microsoft® Exchange solutions from a leading provider -
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