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Re: [CAJON] Washing Passenger Trains - Don Richardson

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  • JThomp1945@aol.com
    To all: ... I should add that the grade at Eighth Street was 0.3% descending for trains going through the washer, causing them to roll downgrade without
    Message 1 of 25 , Mar 6, 2012
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      To all:
       
      Here is more from Don Richardson:
      ------------------
       
      I should add that the grade at Eighth Street was 0.3% descending for trains
      going through the washer, causing them to roll downgrade without braking.

      On closer reflection, I seem to recall that we were required to consume three
      minutes for each car washed, making the washing process 30 minutes for a ten car
      train, more than I said earlier. This works out to about 2 miles per hour, if my
      math is correct.

      Don Richardson
      --------------------
       
      Thanks, Don.
       
      In the days of heavyweight trains, such as the Grand Canyon and the Scout, did those go through the car washers too?
       
      What can you tell us about the spraying of silver paint onto the trucks of the diesels and lightweight cars?
       
      John Thompson


      -----Original Message-----
      From: JThomp1945 <JThomp1945@...>
      To: CAJON <CAJON@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Mon, Mar 5, 2012 10:38 am
      Subject: Re: [CAJON] Washing Passenger Trains - Don Richardson

       
      To all:
       
      Here is further information from Don Richardson:
      -----------------------
       
      All inbound trains ran through the car wash at the Eighth Street coach yard
      after arrival at Los Angeles, as did locomotives assigned to the coast passenger
      pool. I was the only hostler who discovered that the dynamic brake would hold
      the engine at the required 1 mph. This was much easier than using the
      independent brake, as it was difficult to apply the brakes lightly enough to
      avoid stalling. The Budd cars were the worst to handle, as they had no
      independent brakes; you had to use the automatic brakes, which were more
      difficult to control.

      It took about 20 or 30 minutes to wash an entire train. If the engine was
      running backwards, the operator would turn the washer on immediately after the
      cab had cleared, giving us a "bonus" locomotive wash. If it was headed forward,
      the same thing happened, giving us an impromptu shower bath. We learned to keep
      the cab windows closed. I can still smell the pungent aroma of the acid bath
      that kept those stainless steel cars so shiny! I wonder if cars made of CORTEN
      steel got an acid wash?

      Don Richardson
      -------------------------
       
      Thanks, Don.  Would you know the sequence of when the trucks were repainted silver?
       
      John Thompson

    • JThomp1945@aol.com
      ... The heavyweight trains also went through the car wash at Eighth Street. I don t know if they got the acid rinse. The locomotives received new silver paint
      Message 2 of 25 , Mar 8, 2012
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        Here are more answers from Don Richardson:
        -----------------------
         
        The heavyweight trains also went through the car wash at Eighth Street. I don't
        know if they got the acid rinse.

        The locomotives received new silver paint on their trucks on a daily basis just
        before departure from the roundhouse for the depot. I assume the cars were
        treated the same as Eighth Street.

        Environmental regulations would prevent that now (and did for the past several
        years) for the same reason as some aerosols are banned. Any painting now has to
        be inside and within a protective screen.
         
        On a related note, even acid rinses are controversial. On trips to Europe we
        noticed that a lot of the old urban buildings are being cleaned of centuries of
        grime by using an acid rinse. To control air pollution, large plastic sheets are
        hung outside of the buildings from wooden scaffolding. When walking by them in
        the narrow city streets, the acid odor is overwhelming.

        Don Richardson
        --------------------------
         
        Thanks, Don,
        John Thompson



        -----Original Message-----
        From: JThomp1945 <JThomp1945@...>
        To: CAJON <CAJON@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tue, Mar 6, 2012 3:56 pm
        Subject: Re: [CAJON] Washing Passenger Trains - Don Richardson

         
        To all:
         
        Here is more from Don Richardson:
        ------------------
         
        I should add that the grade at Eighth Street was 0.3% descending for trains
        going through the washer, causing them to roll downgrade without braking.

        On closer reflection, I seem to recall that we were required to consume three
        minutes for each car washed, making the washing process 30 minutes for a ten car
        train, more than I said earlier. This works out to about 2 miles per hour, if my
        math is correct.

        Don Richardson
        --------------------
         
        Thanks, Don.
         
        In the days of heavyweight trains, such as the Grand Canyon and the Scout, did those go through the car washers too?
         
        What can you tell us about the spraying of silver paint onto the trucks of the diesels and lightweight cars?
         
        John Thompson


        -----Original Message-----
        From: JThomp1945 <JThomp1945@...>
        To: CAJON <CAJON@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Mon, Mar 5, 2012 10:38 am
        Subject: Re: [CAJON] Washing Passenger Trains - Don Richardson

         
        To all:
         
        Here is further information from Don Richardson:
        -----------------------
         
        All inbound trains ran through the car wash at the Eighth Street coach yard
        after arrival at Los Angeles, as did locomotives assigned to the coast passenger
        pool. I was the only hostler who discovered that the dynamic brake would hold
        the engine at the required 1 mph. This was much easier than using the
        independent brake, as it was difficult to apply the brakes lightly enough to
        avoid stalling. The Budd cars were the worst to handle, as they had no
        independent brakes; you had to use the automatic brakes, which were more
        difficult to control.

        It took about 20 or 30 minutes to wash an entire train. If the engine was
        running backwards, the operator would turn the washer on immediately after the
        cab had cleared, giving us a "bonus" locomotive wash. If it was headed forward,
        the same thing happened, giving us an impromptu shower bath. We learned to keep
        the cab windows closed. I can still smell the pungent aroma of the acid bath
        that kept those stainless steel cars so shiny! I wonder if cars made of CORTEN
        steel got an acid wash?

        Don Richardson
        -------------------------
         
        Thanks, Don.  Would you know the sequence of when the trucks were repainted silver?
         
        John Thompson

      • Darren
        Although this topic has not been discussed for some time, in seaching railpictures.net, at the various pictures taken in the picturesque state of New Mexico, I
        Message 3 of 25 , Sep 3 11:08 PM
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          Although this topic has not been discussed for some time, in seaching railpictures.net, at the various pictures taken in the picturesque state of New Mexico, I found a few pictures of the forklift operated car washer, and thought I'd share...
           
           
           
           


          --- On Mon, 3/5/12, Lancaster James <ljames1@...> wrote:

          From: Lancaster James <ljames1@...>
          Subject: Re: [CAJON] Washing Passenger Trains - Larry Occhiello
          To: CAJON@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, March 5, 2012, 11:37 AM

           

          On Mar 4, 2012, at 11:23 PM, JThomp1945@... wrote:



          To all:
           
          Here's more information from Larry Occhiello:
          -----------------------
           
          As I recall, the washer in Albq. was like a fork lift with the brush mounted so it could service both the regular cars as well as the Hi Level cars.
           
          Larry Occhiello
          -------------------------
           

          There is a small photo of the Albuquerque car washer here:

          Jim Lancaster

        • jtcampbell9603@sbcglobal.net
          Does anybody know of any mishaps that occurred while the Albuquerque mobile washer was scrubbing the side of the train? The way I remember it, one carman
          Message 4 of 25 , Sep 4 1:42 PM
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            Does anybody know of any mishaps that occurred while the Albuquerque mobile washer was scrubbing the side of the train? The way I remember it, one carman operated the washer and the expectation was that passengers would not do stupid things like loiter in the vestibule during washing.

            Tom Campbell
          • william martin
            Tom- IKnow Of None during The Time AT&SF operated The Machine Amtrak Is a other Story Bill Martin Re ATSF From: jtcampbell9603@sbcglobal.net
            Message 5 of 25 , Sep 4 2:27 PM
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              Tom- IKnow Of None during The Time AT&SF operated The Machine Amtrak Is a other Story
              Bill Martin
              Re
              ATSF

              From: "jtcampbell9603@..." <jtcampbell9603@...>
              To: CAJON@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, September 4, 2012 3:42 PM
              Subject: [CAJON] Re: Washing Passenger Trains

               
              Does anybody know of any mishaps that occurred while the Albuquerque mobile washer was scrubbing the side of the train? The way I remember it, one carman operated the washer and the expectation was that passengers would not do stupid things like loiter in the vestibule during washing.

              Tom Campbell


            • me @ home
              Tom Campbell wrote: = Does anybody know of any mishaps that occurred while the Albuquerque mobile washer was scrubbing the side of the train? The way I
              Message 6 of 25 , Sep 4 2:59 PM
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                Tom Campbell wrote:
                =>Does anybody know of any mishaps that occurred while the Albuquerque
                mobile washer was scrubbing the side of the train? The way I remember
                it, one carman operated the washer and the expectation was that
                passengers would not do stupid things like loiter in the vestibule
                during washing.
                =======================================

                And I reply:
                Reminds me of the time I rode thru the stationary washer at
                auto-train's Sanford yards, in a U-36-B,,,, There was more water in
                the cab than on the train!, (and the windows were closed!)
                We got seriously wet! plus the only "mishap" was the engine died
                before we were finished washing the train LOL!

                Ron Loving
                MAIN LINE MOTION PICTURES
                PO Box 3985
                Chester, Virginia 23831

                We now offer PROFESSIONAL transfer of 8mm & 16mm film to video!
                Call for info.

                New Tehachapi Cajon DVD shot mostly in the early 1970's
                http://mlmp.tripod.com//web/franzsalepage.htm
                If you have free long distance, call 804-526-2317 or
                TOLL-FREE: (in the USA only) 866-826-4809 (in the USA only)
                E-Mail: hoboron@...
                Website: http://www.mainlinemotionpictures.com




                =>Does anybody know of any mishaps that occurred while the Albuquerque
                mobile washer was scrubbing the side of the train? The way I remember
                it, one carman operated the washer and the expectation was that
                passengers would not do stupid things like loiter in the vestibule
                during washing.
                =>
                =>Tom Campbell
                =>
                =>------------------------------------
                =>
                =>Yahoo! Groups Links
                =>
                =>
                =>
              • Thomas Thompson
                Noticed several windows in the high level dome appeared scratched or abraded enough to ruin the view during an Amtrak trip. I wonder if the windows were
                Message 7 of 25 , Sep 4 4:15 PM
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                  Noticed several windows in the high level dome appeared scratched or abraded enough to ruin the view during an Amtrak trip. I wonder if the windows were replaced with plastic or the car was not an original heritage car. Don't remember the car origin as it has been some years. Possibly that occurred using worn out brushes. Amtrak did not impress as the heading out crew was acceptable while return trip crew was simply inconvenienced by the presence of passengers. Reminded me of going to to post office before the cutbacks.

                  Tom Thompson


                  From: "me @ home" <hoboron@...>
                  To: CAJON@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tue, September 4, 2012 4:59:23 PM
                  Subject: Re: [CAJON] Re: Washing Passenger Trains

                   


                  Tom Campbell wrote:
                  =>Does anybody know of any mishaps that occurred while the Albuquerque
                  mobile washer was scrubbing the side of the train? The way I remember
                  it, one carman operated the washer and the expectation was that
                  passengers would not do stupid things like loiter in the vestibule
                  during washing.
                  =======================================

                  And I reply:
                  Reminds me of the time I rode thru the stationary washer at
                  auto-train's Sanford yards, in a U-36-B,,,, There was more water in
                  the cab than on the train!, (and the windows were closed!)
                  We got seriously wet! plus the only "mishap" was the engine died
                  before we were finished washing the train LOL!

                  Ron Loving
                  MAIN LINE MOTION PICTURES
                  PO Box 3985
                  Chester, Virginia 23831

                  We now offer PROFESSIONAL transfer of 8mm & 16mm film to video!
                  Call for info.

                  New Tehachapi Cajon DVD shot mostly in the early 1970's
                  http://mlmp.tripod.com//web/franzsalepage.htm
                  If you have free long distance, call 804-526-2317 or
                  TOLL-FREE: (in the USA only) 866-826-4809 (in the USA only)
                  E-Mail: hoboron@...
                  Website: http://www.mainlinemotionpictures.com

                  =>Does anybody know of any mishaps that occurred while the Albuquerque
                  mobile washer was scrubbing the side of the train? The way I remember
                  it, one carman operated the washer and the expectation was that
                  passengers would not do stupid things like loiter in the vestibule
                  during washing.
                  =>
                  =>Tom Campbell
                  =>
                  =>------------------------------------
                  =>
                  =>Yahoo! Groups Links
                  =>
                  =>
                  =>

                • JThomp1945@aol.com
                  To all: ... Experience starting in 1947, in riding the Scout, Calif.Ltd, Grand Canyon Ltd, and El Cap, I observed that the traps and doors were always closed
                  Message 8 of 25 , Sep 6 4:23 PM
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                    To all:
                     
                    Bob Drenk sends this note:
                    ----------------------
                     
                    Experience starting in 1947, in riding the Scout, Calif.Ltd, Grand Canyon Ltd, and El Cap,
                    I observed that the traps and doors were always closed by the CCA's.. with prior warning.
                    Bob Drenk
                    ----------------------
                     
                    Thanks, Bob,
                    John Thompson
                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: me @ home <hoboron@...>
                    To: CAJON <CAJON@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tue, Sep 4, 2012 2:59 pm
                    Subject: Re: [CAJON] Re: Washing Passenger Trains

                     

                    Tom Campbell wrote:
                    =>Does anybody know of any mishaps that occurred while the Albuquerque
                    mobile washer was scrubbing the side of the train? The way I remember
                    it, one carman operated the washer and the expectation was that
                    passengers would not do stupid things like loiter in the vestibule
                    during washing.
                    =======================================

                    And I reply:
                    Reminds me of the time I rode thru the stationary washer at
                    auto-train's Sanford yards, in a U-36-B,,,, There was more water in
                    the cab than on the train!, (and the windows were closed!)
                    We got seriously wet! plus the only "mishap" was the engine died
                    before we were finished washing the train LOL!

                    Ron Loving
                    MAIN LINE MOTION PICTURES
                    PO Box 3985
                    Chester, Virginia 23831

                    We now offer PROFESSIONAL transfer of 8mm & 16mm film to video!
                    Call for info.

                    New Tehachapi Cajon DVD shot mostly in the early 1970's
                    http://mlmp.tripod.com//web/franzsalepage.htm
                    If you have free long distance, call 804-526-2317 or
                    TOLL-FREE: (in the USA only) 866-826-4809 (in the USA only)
                    E-Mail: hoboron@...
                    Website: http://www.mainlinemotionpictures.com

                    =>Does anybody know of any mishaps that occurred while the Albuquerque
                    mobile washer was scrubbing the side of the train? The way I remember
                    it, one carman operated the washer and the expectation was that
                    passengers would not do stupid things like loiter in the vestibule
                    during washing.
                    =>
                    =>Tom Campbell
                    =>
                    =>------------------------------------
                    =>
                    =>Yahoo! Groups Links
                    =>
                    =>
                    =>
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