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Re: [CAD_CAM_EDM_DRO] 3-Phase motor running from Single Phase Supply ?

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  • Matt Shaver
    ... In the US, 3 phase power is generally only available to industrial areas. If you wanted it in a residence, you would have to pay the entire cost of
    Message 1 of 38 , Jan 1, 2001
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      Chris Hellyar wrote:
      > Is it a major task to get 3 phase in some other parts of the world where
      > people are posting from?

      In the US, 3 phase power is generally only available to industrial
      areas. If you wanted it in a residence, you would have to pay the entire
      cost of stringing up the power lines from wherever the nearest 3 phase
      power was to your location. As most power companies are unionized, just
      the labor alone could run into the tens of thousands of dollars. Even if
      you were willing to pay the cost, the next problem you'll have is from
      the zoning authorities. I don't know how things work in NZ, but in the
      US different areas are designated for different uses such as residential
      (houses), commercial (stores), and industrial (machine shops, etc.).
      It's illegal in most areas to have machine shop in your home, if you do
      work for hire. If you're strictly a hobbyist, that's probably OK, as
      long as the neighbors don't complain about the noise, smell, or tractor
      trailers delivering steel and machinery to your house. The local zoning
      board (which would find out about your 3 phase power installation from
      the permit you would need for the electrical work) might get the idea
      that having three phase power puts your operation beyond the "hobbyist
      class". Also, the inspector that comes to check the wiring might rat you
      out to the zoning department if he looks around at your shop and thinks
      you've got some type of business going in your home. The worst case is
      that they take you to court, fine you a couple grand, and force you to
      get rid of your machinery.

      All that said, I know of lots of machine shops in houses (mostly small
      commercial job shops ;) ). They "get away with it" by keeping a low
      profile and camouflaging their operation as best they can. As an
      example, I never leave my garage door open because I don't want anyone
      to see my machines and decide to notify the authorities. Actually, I
      live in an older neighborhood and my neighbors could care less what I do
      (and I, them), but in the newer neighborhoods that have community
      organizations and restrictive covenants (rules you have to follow such
      as what color you are allowed to paint your front door), you could have
      real trouble.

      In short, yes, it's a major task.

      Matt (who lives in the land of the free, sort of...)
    • davemucha@juno.com
      Sorry for the stale response. I m trying to get this *@#%$^ Yahoo setup. Getting the posts to be most recent first is a pain.
      Message 38 of 38 , Jan 28, 2001
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        Sorry for the stale response. I'm trying to get this *@#%$^ Yahoo
        setup. Getting the posts to be most recent first is a pain.

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cad_cam_edm_dro/messagesearch

        will show the most recent at the top, and you scroll down
        to get older stuff.

        Cheers



        --- In CAD_CAM_EDM_DRO@y..., davemucha@j... wrote:
        > Hi,
        >
        > you don't need to get overly complicated. Suffice it to say you
        > cannot afford to get 3 phase from the power company.
        >
        > You can buy a 3 phase converter. They make an electronic converter
        > that takes single phase in and outputs 3 phase. MANY shops use
        this
        > to run 3 hp Bridgeports.
        >
        > Lathes would be better off by using a rotary converter, more money,
        > but better sine wave output for more even power.
        >
        > Expect about $125 US for a 5 hp electronic and near $300 for a
        rotary.
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In CAD_CAM_EDM_DRO@y..., Matt Shaver <mshaver@e...> wrote:
        > > Chris Hellyar wrote:
        > > > Is it a major task to get 3 phase in some other parts of the
        > world where
        > > > people are posting from?
        > >
        > > In the US, 3 phase power is generally only available to industrial
        > > areas. If you wanted it in a residence, you would have to pay the
        > entire
        > > cost of stringing up the power lines from wherever the nearest 3
        > phase
        > > power was to your location. As most power companies are
        unionized,
        > just
        > > the labor alone could run into the tens of thousands of dollars.
        > Even if
        > > you were willing to pay the cost, the next problem you'll have is
        > from
        > > the zoning authorities. I don't know how things work in NZ, but
        in
        > the
        > > US different areas are designated for different uses such as
        > residential
        > > (houses), commercial (stores), and industrial (machine shops,
        etc.).
        > > It's illegal in most areas to have machine shop in your home, if
        > you do
        > > work for hire. If you're strictly a hobbyist, that's probably OK,
        as
        > > long as the neighbors don't complain about the noise, smell, or
        > tractor
        > > trailers delivering steel and machinery to your house. The local
        > zoning
        > > board (which would find out about your 3 phase power installation
        > from
        > > the permit you would need for the electrical work) might get the
        > idea
        > > that having three phase power puts your operation beyond
        > the "hobbyist
        > > class". Also, the inspector that comes to check the wiring might
        > rat you
        > > out to the zoning department if he looks around at your shop and
        > thinks
        > > you've got some type of business going in your home. The worst
        case
        > is
        > > that they take you to court, fine you a couple grand, and force
        you
        > to
        > > get rid of your machinery.
        > >
        > > All that said, I know of lots of machine shops in houses (mostly
        > small
        > > commercial job shops ;) ). They "get away with it" by keeping a
        low
        > > profile and camouflaging their operation as best they can. As an
        > > example, I never leave my garage door open because I don't want
        > anyone
        > > to see my machines and decide to notify the authorities.
        Actually, I
        > > live in an older neighborhood and my neighbors could care less
        what
        > I do
        > > (and I, them), but in the newer neighborhoods that have community
        > > organizations and restrictive covenants (rules you have to follow
        > such
        > > as what color you are allowed to paint your front door), you
        could
        > have
        > > real trouble.
        > >
        > > In short, yes, it's a major task.
        > >
        > > Matt (who lives in the land of the free, sort of...)
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