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Around the Roman Table on Google Books

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  • ammadoukaina
    Here s the link. This is a book recommended by Marcus Audens, and I found it free online! Check it out!
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 8, 2011
      Here's the link. This is a book recommended by Marcus Audens, and I found it free online! Check it out!

      http://books.google.com/books?id=YXGlAr17oekC&pg=PA374&dq=Around+the+Roman+Table:+Food+and+Feasting+in+Ancient+Rome&hl=en&ei=VCd3Tc_cF4mqsAOUutm8BA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDkQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

      I have a list of cookbooks on Amazon...I cannot wait to order them!

      Blessings,
      Amma
    • Cassius
      Greetings, What a wonderful find. Many thanks to Senator Marcus Audens and yourself for finding this. I still haven t had any real Byzantine food EVER... but
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 11, 2011
        Greetings,

        What a wonderful find. Many thanks to Senator Marcus Audens and yourself for finding this.

        I still haven't had any real Byzantine food EVER... but I've had Roman food many times and enjoy it very much. Sigh... one of these days I'm going to have to try cooking from a... (gulp)... recipe. I've managed 46 years without even making an attempt yet, but the temptation is there, lol!

        Now if only there was a good how-to costuming manual online! ;)

        -Marcus Cassius Julianus



        --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, "ammadoukaina" <ammadoukaina@...> wrote:
        >
        > Here's the link. This is a book recommended by Marcus Audens, and I found it free online! Check it out!
        >
        > http://books.google.com/books?id=YXGlAr17oekC&pg=PA374&dq=Around+the+Roman+Table:+Food+and+Feasting+in+Ancient+Rome&hl=en&ei=VCd3Tc_cF4mqsAOUutm8BA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDkQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false
        >
        > I have a list of cookbooks on Amazon...I cannot wait to order them!
        >
        > Blessings,
        > Amma
        >
      • Amma Doukaina
        Hmm...seems like I ve seen a costuming site somewhere. I ll see if I can find anything. As for the Byzantine food, I bet you ve had marzipan. Everyone s had
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 11, 2011
          Hmm...seems like I've seen a costuming site somewhere. I'll see if I can find anything. As for the Byzantine food, I bet you've had marzipan. Everyone's had that right? LOL What about mead? What about lamb with rosemary and mint? Honey-basted pork or lamb? Maybe you've had more Byzantine food than you think! Walnuts, dates and figs were commonly eaten prior to a meal to whet the appetite.

          And if you let me know what you'd like to make, I'll happily see if I can dig up, or even create, a recipe. I recently unloaded a box with all my medieval recipes and culinary info. If it's something that would be more difficult in a modern kitchen (like spit-roasting a hog) I can redact it into a more modern appliance-friendly recipe for you. I just found a great source up the road from me of pure cone sugar...much better than the processed muck we typically use for sweeteners! And our international market has wonderful waters, like orange and rose, and we have an organic market that carries fresh figs and a wide selection of other fruits and nuts that are Byzantine-appropriate, which you can find in many markets depending where in the world you are. And citrus! And more! Look around, and you'll see "Byzantine" foods all over! :)

          I love food. I love to cook, and I love to feed people. I believe if you cook with love and passion, you feed not only the body, but also the soul. I pray that one day I'm blessed to prepare a meal for BN folks! It would be wonderful to spit roast a hog and a lamb with honeymead and herbs, lay out fresh plates of olives and cheese with bread, fruit and nuts. MMmmmmm...hungry yet?

          Blessings,
          Amma


          He who attains love cannot fall.
          
          —Saint Macarius the Great

          On 3/11/2011 7:42 AM, Cassius wrote:
           

          Greetings,

          What a wonderful find. Many thanks to Senator Marcus Audens and yourself for finding this.

          I still haven't had any real Byzantine food EVER... but I've had Roman food many times and enjoy it very much. Sigh... one of these days I'm going to have to try cooking from a... (gulp)... recipe. I've managed 46 years without even making an attempt yet, but the temptation is there, lol!

          Now if only there was a good how-to costuming manual online! ;)

          -Marcus Cassius Julianus

          --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, "ammadoukaina" <ammadoukaina@...> wrote:
          >
          > Here's the link. This is a book recommended by Marcus Audens, and I found it free online! Check it out!
          >
          > http://books.google.com/books?id=YXGlAr17oekC&pg=PA374&dq=Around+the+Roman+Table:+Food+and+Feasting+in+Ancient+Rome&hl=en&ei=VCd3Tc_cF4mqsAOUutm8BA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDkQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false
          >
          > I have a list of cookbooks on Amazon...I cannot wait to order them!
          >
          > Blessings,
          > Amma
          >

        • Timothy Dawson
          ... (gulp)... recipe. I ve managed 46 years without even making an attempt yet, Well, it really isn t a problem as there are no Byzantine recipes per se. So
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 13, 2011
            On 11 Mar 2011, at 14:42, Cassius wrote:
            >. one of these days I'm going to have to try cooking from a...
            (gulp)... recipe. I've managed 46 years without even making an attempt
            yet,

            Well, it really isn't a problem as there are no Byzantine recipes per
            se. So just read some sources, get together some ingredients they
            mention and cook something you like. Voilla! That has worked well
            for me for 20 years.

            A point I shall be making when I give a paper on this subject at the
            International Medieval Congress in July is that recipes are something
            of mirage. Food is always an intensely personal and transitory
            experience, that is often influenced by things other than the food
            itself. So even when one has a recipe, and all the ingredients it
            mentions, and follows it to the letter, the best that can be said is
            that one has had an approximate impression of what someone from then
            might have experienced on one occasion. The common factor is that
            people will always have wanted to eat something they enjoyed. So enjoy!

            Timothy
          • Cassius
            This may sound a bit silly, but that s great advice I honestly never thought of. Thank you! :) Hmm... now a list of Byzantine ingredients would be helpful. I m
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 13, 2011
              This may sound a bit silly, but that's great advice I honestly never thought of. Thank you! :)

              Hmm... now a list of Byzantine ingredients would be helpful. I'm no great cook, but I do like to "create" stuff that seems like it would be tasty. If you're using the correct food basics (common meats, veggies, spices, etc) how "off topic" could that kind of cooking really be?

              -Marcus Cassius Julianus

              --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, Timothy Dawson <timothy@...> wrote:
              >
              > On 11 Mar 2011, at 14:42, Cassius wrote:
              > >. one of these days I'm going to have to try cooking from a...
              > (gulp)... recipe. I've managed 46 years without even making an attempt
              > yet,
              >
              > Well, it really isn't a problem as there are no Byzantine recipes per
              > se. So just read some sources, get together some ingredients they
              > mention and cook something you like. Voilla! That has worked well
              > for me for 20 years.
              >
              > A point I shall be making when I give a paper on this subject at the
              > International Medieval Congress in July is that recipes are something
              > of mirage. Food is always an intensely personal and transitory
              > experience, that is often influenced by things other than the food
              > itself. So even when one has a recipe, and all the ingredients it
              > mentions, and follows it to the letter, the best that can be said is
              > that one has had an approximate impression of what someone from then
              > might have experienced on one occasion. The common factor is that
              > people will always have wanted to eat something they enjoyed. So enjoy!
              >
              > Timothy
              >
            • Amma Doukaina
              Well, create away and share your successful recipes! Very true that we have to kind of play by ear when we think of what was eaten in the past. Nothing more
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 13, 2011
                Well, create away and share your successful recipes! Very true that we have to kind of play by ear when we think of what was eaten in the past. Nothing more fun than poring over medieval receipts to look for menu ideas! And much of it wasn't all that tasty you realize when you recreate it and sometimes those sauces look more like vomit than edible food. If you're a good creation cook, you can have a lot of fun just fiddling with the possibilities. Of course, I think every culture has always had its own "stuff in a pot" recipes, where this and that come together to make a totally unique dish, and I can imagine that anyone cooking for a family then, as now, looked in the pantry and came up with something amazing out of scraps and leftovers quite often. :)

                You could always take on baking, and then we'd be unable to call you off for public service. That would be a nice retirement....bake all day and know that no one would be taking you or your animals off to war.

                And since we're on the topic of food, here's an idiot-proof recipe for pork and a common method for cooking it from the Byzantine era (over a spit, of course, not in the oven). I love easy recipes.

                Pop a pork roast, fat side up in a roasting pan that has a high lid so there's plenty of room above the meat when it's covered. Find a local liquor store that sells honeymead...there are a few microbreweries that do them here in CO, but I'm certain there are others that would be elsewhere. Baste the pork roast with honeymead as you slow-roast it, several hours at around 250-300 degrees, or even on a spit if you have it.
                He who attains love cannot fall.
                
                —Saint Macarius the Great

                On 3/13/2011 5:02 PM, Cassius wrote:
                 

                This may sound a bit silly, but that's great advice I honestly never thought of. Thank you! :)

                Hmm... now a list of Byzantine ingredients would be helpful. I'm no great cook, but I do like to "create" stuff that seems like it would be tasty. If you're using the correct food basics (common meats, veggies, spices, etc) how "off topic" could that kind of cooking really be?

                -Marcus Cassius Julianus

                --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, Timothy Dawson <timothy@...> wrote:
                >
                > On 11 Mar 2011, at 14:42, Cassius wrote:
                > >. one of these days I'm going to have to try cooking from a...
                > (gulp)... recipe. I've managed 46 years without even making an attempt
                > yet,
                >
                > Well, it really isn't a problem as there are no Byzantine recipes per
                > se. So just read some sources, get together some ingredients they
                > mention and cook something you like. Voilla! That has worked well
                > for me for 20 years.
                >
                > A point I shall be making when I give a paper on this subject at the
                > International Medieval Congress in July is that recipes are something
                > of mirage. Food is always an intensely personal and transitory
                > experience, that is often influenced by things other than the food
                > itself. So even when one has a recipe, and all the ingredients it
                > mentions, and follows it to the letter, the best that can be said is
                > that one has had an approximate impression of what someone from then
                > might have experienced on one occasion. The common factor is that
                > people will always have wanted to eat something they enjoyed. So enjoy!
                >
                > Timothy
                >

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