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Re: Daily Life in Byzantium...

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  • Cassius
    Greetings Amma, I didn t know ANY of this... this would make a great article in the Culture section of the website if you ever get a chance to write it up as a
    Message 1 of 20 , Dec 14, 2010
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      Greetings Amma,

      I didn't know ANY of this... this would make a great article in the Culture section of the website if you ever get a chance to write it up as a stand-alone bit. Not that we have much of a way to compensate you since there's no treasury at the moment. Maybe trade you for an ancient Byzantine artifact? THOSE we've got, lol!

      -Marcus Cassius Julianus



      --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, Amma Ulfsson <ammaulfsson@...> wrote:
      >
      > I'm so glad you asked! LOL Well, the Byzantines invented marzipan and
      > the fork, so we know they were not untalented when it came to eating! In
      > fact, the fork began as a sharpened end to a spoon which they would
      > 'spear' their food with. It then developed into the 3, 4 and 5-prong forks.
      >
      > Sauces were typically made of vinegar with either oil or honey, and
      > they enjoyed walnuts, capers, dried fruits and citrus. The common
      > cheeses were called prophatos and mizithra cheese. Breads were a
      > necessary staple, so much so that bakers and their animals were exempt
      > from any public duty at all, and they were the only ones! The herbs and
      > spices were perhaps the most amazing things- not only were Roman spices
      > in use, but also carroway, nutmeg, cinnamon, anise, mastic, cumin and
      > more. They were the first to mix sweet and savory and the first to use
      > saffron in cooking!
      >
      > Meat was typically pork, although lamb was also eaten. The wealthy
      > hunted gazelle and wild ass, and the Imperial Court kept lands for such
      > hunting! Salted mullet roe that was pressed into a dry sausage of sorts
      > was eaten, with caviar used commonly by the 1100s. On Orthodox fast
      > days, no meat or fish was usually eaten and instead, they ate pease
      > pudding with nutmeg. Millet porridge called piston was also commonly
      > eaten throughout the week, and millet is very good for you! Typically
      > during the medieval period, beef was cooked with verjuice, which
      > provided a bit of acid to deal with the typical issue of old meat. I
      > always add a bit of balsamic or red wine vinegar to my beef roasts to
      > enhance the flavor. I redacted a medieval roast recipe for the crock
      > pot, and it's delicious every time! :)
      >
      > Wines were resinated, much like retsina today, or sweet, like a muscato
      > yum!). Poushka (Roman posca) was also common. Honeywine (mead) was as
      > common as everywhere else, and was used to flavor foods!
      >
      > Rose sugar was a common sweet, and of course, the cult of St. Nicholas
      > invented the gingerbread cookie!
      >
      > Ah, and I'm adding black-eyed peas with a vinegar and honey sauce to the
      > menu, along with chichees- add a couple of cups of cooked chick peas
      > (garbanzos) to a pan and cover half the peas with water. Pour in just
      > enough olive oil to cover the peas and toss in several cloves of roasted
      > garlic. A couple of hours on a low setting, and yum.
      >
      > And, as Marcus Audens and I have been discussing, olive oil was used not
      > only for food, but for bathing as well! Oil was perfumed with herbs and
      > spices to help overcome the smells of a world without Tide and
      > deodorant, and the body would be rubbed in warm oil and scraped clean.
      >
      > Blessings,
      > Amma
      >
      > He who attains love cannot fall.
      >
      > ---Saint Macarius the Great
      >
      >
      > On 12/13/2010 1:55 PM, damnnedbeloved wrote:
      > >
      > > Khairete,
      > >
      > > So just out of curiousity, what was the cuisine like back then?
      > >
      > > Pax,
      > > Aeternia
      > >
      > > --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com
      > > <mailto:ByzantiumNovumCulture%40yahoogroups.com>, Amma Ulfsson
      > > <ammaulfsson@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Greetings dear Cassius,
      > > >
      > > > It seems as though soap was widely in use, but so was olive oil and
      > > > strigil bathing. Olive oil is one of the best things you can use on
      > > your
      > > > skin. In ancient times it was not only used for cleansing the body, but
      > > > it was also used medicinally and as an aphrodisiac! Most women know the
      > > > benefits of warm olive oil on dry skin or hair.
      > > >
      > > > On a side note, I'm considering making our Christmas dinner all
      > > > Byzantine this year. Anyone else?
      > > >
      > > > Amma
      > > >
      > > > He who attains love cannot fall.
      > > >
      > > > ---Saint Macarius the Great
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > On 12/11/2010 9:09 PM, Cassius wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Greetings Amma,
      > > > >
      > > > > I think "Daily Life in Byzantium" is out of print, but I'm sure a
      > > copy
      > > > > can still be found through Amazon, eBay or other online source.
      > > That's
      > > > > where I got my copy, lol!
      > > > >
      > > > > I've always wanted to have my own Roman bath as well. One thing I've
      > > > > really always wanted is a strigil... I'd actually use the thing!
      > > > >
      > > > > Even speaking of that, the lack of Byzantine detail is maddening. Did
      > > > > the Byzantines use oil and a strigil to remove dirt before
      > > bathing? Or
      > > > > did soap come into vogue sometime during the Byzantine period? I'll
      > > > > have to look that up!
      > > > >
      > > > > -Cassius
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com
      > > <mailto:ByzantiumNovumCulture%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > <mailto:ByzantiumNovumCulture%40yahoogroups.com>, Amma Ulfsson
      > > > > <ammaulfsson@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I have always wanted a Roman-style bath of my own! Of course, I
      > > need
      > > > > the
      > > > > > huge home to put it in first! No, it certainly wouldn't be
      > > public! :)
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I have been doing some reading to brush up on my cooking and food
      > > > > > knowledge, so I'll be interested to hear about more of what this
      > > book
      > > > > > offers! And I'll be looking for that book myself!
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Blessings,
      > > > > > Amma
      > > > > >
      > > > > > He who attains love cannot fall.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > ---Saint Macarius the Great
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > On 12/8/2010 8:38 PM, Cassius wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Greetings all,
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I finally received my copy of "Daily Life in Byzantium" but
      > > haven't
      > > > > > > had time to read much. However, the couple of snippits I have
      > > glanced
      > > > > > > at have me a little upset!
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > It's astounding how much information there is out there on
      > > Classical
      > > > > > > Rome. Every aspect of daily life is written about... from what
      > > > > went on
      > > > > > > in the baths, to how they cooked, gardened, dressed, made cloth,
      > > > > > > organized their homes, did art, etc. etc.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Byzantium? Well, who would bother to write about that!
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > It occured to me that I didn't even know if the Byzantines
      > > used Roman
      > > > > > > style baths. I looked it up online.. got ONE Wikipedia article
      > > > > about a
      > > > > > > bath house in Constantinople, that was burned down in the Nika
      > > riots
      > > > > > > and was "later rebuilt."
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > That's it.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > So far the Daily Life book is a gem, even though it's
      > > certainly not
      > > > > > > exhaustive in detail itself.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Anyway, the answer to my question was... the Byzantines pretty
      > > much
      > > > > > > kept up the Roman public bath system. It was common for
      > > Citizens in
      > > > > > > Constantinople to visit the baths twice a day, but three times was
      > > > > > > considered a bit decadant. The men and women bathed at different
      > > > > times
      > > > > > > because morals had changed a bit... but it all remained pretty
      > > much
      > > > > > > Roman for many centuries.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > It's the little details that make things interesting to the
      > > public I
      > > > > > > think. I've seen people really interested in the Roman baths, and
      > > > > it's
      > > > > > > amazing to see that the subject is ignored in Byzantium... simply
      > > > > > > because it was the *Eastern* empire.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Lots of cultural work to be done here I think! :)
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > -Marcus Cassius Julianus
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Amma Ulfsson
      To spear things while cooking makes perfect sense, but the fork with which you eat food came to us thanks to the Byzantines. Of course, it was a woman. Just
      Message 2 of 20 , Dec 14, 2010
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        To spear things while cooking makes perfect sense, but the fork with which you eat food came to us thanks to the Byzantines. Of course, it was a woman.
        Just one little article....
        http://mybyzantine.wordpress.com/2010/11/09/byzantine-women-%E2%80%93-the-princess-theophano-and-introducing-the-fork-into-europe/
        He who attains love cannot fall.
        
        —Saint Macarius the Great

        On 12/14/2010 4:28 AM, Timothy Dawson wrote:  

        On 14 Dec 2010, at 04:59, Amma Ulfsson wrote:
        > In fact, the fork began as a sharpened end to a spoon which they
        would 'spear' their food with.

        Where on earth did you get this bizarre idea? The two pronged fork as
        a cooking utensil existed as far back as Classical Greece. When it
        jumped from kitchen to table is presently uncertain (prior to the C4th
        CE, apparently), but I do suspect some Persian influence as it seems
        to have been confined to the East. Eating forks with more than two
        prongs post-date 1453.

        Timotheos

      • Belle Morte Statia
        You know I think it s safe to say.. Madam Amma puts my Lady Medievalist Mum almost to shame. Can I adopt you? seriously :-) ~Altessa Aeternia ... You know I
        Message 3 of 20 , Dec 14, 2010
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          You know I think it's safe to say..  Madam Amma puts my Lady Medievalist Mum almost to shame.


          Can I adopt you?  seriously :-)


          ~Altessa Aeternia

          On Mon, Dec 13, 2010 at 9:59 PM, Amma Ulfsson <ammaulfsson@...> wrote:
           

          I'm so glad you asked! LOL Well, the Byzantines invented marzipan and the fork, so we know they were not untalented when it came to eating! In fact, the fork began as a sharpened end to a spoon which they would 'spear' their food with. It then developed into the 3, 4 and 5-prong forks.

           Sauces were typically made of vinegar with either oil or honey, and they enjoyed walnuts, capers, dried fruits and citrus. The common cheeses were called prophatos and mizithra cheese. Breads were a necessary staple, so much so that bakers and their animals were exempt from any public duty at all, and they were the only ones! The herbs and spices were perhaps the most amazing things- not only were Roman spices in use, but also carroway, nutmeg, cinnamon, anise, mastic, cumin and more. They were the first to mix sweet and savory and the first to use saffron in cooking!

          Meat was typically pork, although lamb was also eaten. The wealthy hunted gazelle and wild ass, and the Imperial Court kept lands for such hunting! Salted mullet roe that was pressed into a dry sausage of sorts was eaten, with caviar used commonly by the 1100s. On Orthodox fast days, no meat or fish was usually eaten and instead, they ate pease pudding with nutmeg. Millet porridge called piston was also commonly eaten throughout the week, and millet is very good for you! Typically during the medieval period, beef was cooked with verjuice, which provided a bit of acid to deal with the typical issue of old meat. I always add a bit of balsamic or red wine vinegar to my beef roasts to enhance the flavor. I redacted a medieval roast recipe for the crock pot, and it's delicious every time! :)

          Wines were resinated, much like retsina today, or sweet, like a muscato yum!). Poushka (Roman posca) was also common. Honeywine (mead) was as common as everywhere else, and was used to flavor foods!

           Rose sugar was a common sweet, and of course, the cult of St. Nicholas invented the gingerbread cookie!

          Ah, and I'm adding black-eyed peas with a vinegar and honey sauce to the menu, along with chichees- add a couple of cups of cooked chick peas (garbanzos) to a pan and cover half the peas with water. Pour in just enough olive oil to cover the peas and toss in several cloves of roasted garlic. A couple of hours on a low setting, and yum.

          And, as Marcus Audens and I have been discussing, olive oil was used not only for food, but for bathing as well! Oil was perfumed with herbs and spices to help overcome the smells of a world without Tide and deodorant, and the body would be rubbed in warm oil and scraped clean.


          Blessings,
          Amma

          He who attains love cannot fall.
          
          —Saint Macarius the Great

          On 12/13/2010 1:55 PM, damnnedbeloved wrote:
           

          Khairete,

          So just out of curiousity, what was the cuisine like back then?

          Pax,
          Aeternia

          --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, Amma Ulfsson <ammaulfsson@...> wrote:
          >
          > Greetings dear Cassius,
          >
          > It seems as though soap was widely in use, but so was olive oil and
          > strigil bathing. Olive oil is one of the best things you can use on your
          > skin. In ancient times it was not only used for cleansing the body, but
          > it was also used medicinally and as an aphrodisiac! Most women know the
          > benefits of warm olive oil on dry skin or hair.
          >
          > On a side note, I'm considering making our Christmas dinner all
          > Byzantine this year. Anyone else?
          >
          > Amma
          >
          > He who attains love cannot fall.
          >
          > ---Saint Macarius the Great
          >
          >
          > On 12/11/2010 9:09 PM, Cassius wrote:
          > >
          > > Greetings Amma,
          > >
          > > I think "Daily Life in Byzantium" is out of print, but I'm sure a copy
          > > can still be found through Amazon, eBay or other online source. That's
          > > where I got my copy, lol!
          > >
          > > I've always wanted to have my own Roman bath as well. One thing I've
          > > really always wanted is a strigil... I'd actually use the thing!
          > >
          > > Even speaking of that, the lack of Byzantine detail is maddening. Did
          > > the Byzantines use oil and a strigil to remove dirt before bathing? Or
          > > did soap come into vogue sometime during the Byzantine period? I'll
          > > have to look that up!
          > >
          > > -Cassius
          > >
          > > --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com
          > > <mailto:ByzantiumNovumCulture%40yahoogroups.com>, Amma Ulfsson
          > > <ammaulfsson@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > I have always wanted a Roman-style bath of my own! Of course, I need
          > > the
          > > > huge home to put it in first! No, it certainly wouldn't be public! :)
          > > >
          > > > I have been doing some reading to brush up on my cooking and food
          > > > knowledge, so I'll be interested to hear about more of what this book
          > > > offers! And I'll be looking for that book myself!
          > > >
          > > > Blessings,
          > > > Amma
          > > >
          > > > He who attains love cannot fall.
          > > >
          > > > ---Saint Macarius the Great
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > On 12/8/2010 8:38 PM, Cassius wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > Greetings all,
          > > > >
          > > > > I finally received my copy of "Daily Life in Byzantium" but haven't
          > > > > had time to read much. However, the couple of snippits I have glanced
          > > > > at have me a little upset!
          > > > >
          > > > > It's astounding how much information there is out there on Classical
          > > > > Rome. Every aspect of daily life is written about... from what
          > > went on
          > > > > in the baths, to how they cooked, gardened, dressed, made cloth,
          > > > > organized their homes, did art, etc. etc.
          > > > >
          > > > > Byzantium? Well, who would bother to write about that!
          > > > >
          > > > > It occured to me that I didn't even know if the Byzantines used Roman
          > > > > style baths. I looked it up online.. got ONE Wikipedia article
          > > about a
          > > > > bath house in Constantinople, that was burned down in the Nika riots
          > > > > and was "later rebuilt."
          > > > >
          > > > > That's it.
          > > > >
          > > > > So far the Daily Life book is a gem, even though it's certainly not
          > > > > exhaustive in detail itself.
          > > > >
          > > > > Anyway, the answer to my question was... the Byzantines pretty much
          > > > > kept up the Roman public bath system. It was common for Citizens in
          > > > > Constantinople to visit the baths twice a day, but three times was
          > > > > considered a bit decadant. The men and women bathed at different
          > > times
          > > > > because morals had changed a bit... but it all remained pretty much
          > > > > Roman for many centuries.
          > > > >
          > > > > It's the little details that make things interesting to the public I
          > > > > think. I've seen people really interested in the Roman baths, and
          > > it's
          > > > > amazing to see that the subject is ignored in Byzantium... simply
          > > > > because it was the *Eastern* empire.
          > > > >
          > > > > Lots of cultural work to be done here I think! :)
          > > > >
          > > > > -Marcus Cassius Julianus
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          >


        • Amma Ulfsson
          You flatter me unnecessarily, my dear. And certainly, I am up for adoption! One rule, you must let me cook! He who attains love cannot fall. —Saint Macarius
          Message 4 of 20 , Dec 15, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            You flatter me unnecessarily, my dear. And certainly, I am up for adoption! One rule, you must let me cook!
            He who attains love cannot fall.
            
            —Saint Macarius the Great

            On 12/14/2010 10:23 PM, Belle Morte Statia wrote:  

            You know I think it's safe to say..  Madam Amma puts my Lady Medievalist Mum almost to shame.


            Can I adopt you?  seriously :-)


            ~Altessa Aeternia

            On Mon, Dec 13, 2010 at 9:59 PM, Amma Ulfsson <ammaulfsson@...> wrote:
             

            I'm so glad you asked! LOL Well, the Byzantines invented marzipan and the fork, so we know they were not untalented when it came to eating! In fact, the fork began as a sharpened end to a spoon which they would 'spear' their food with. It then developed into the 3, 4 and 5-prong forks.

             Sauces were typically made of vinegar with either oil or honey, and they enjoyed walnuts, capers, dried fruits and citrus. The common cheeses were called prophatos and mizithra cheese. Breads were a necessary staple, so much so that bakers and their animals were exempt from any public duty at all, and they were the only ones! The herbs and spices were perhaps the most amazing things- not only were Roman spices in use, but also carroway, nutmeg, cinnamon, anise, mastic, cumin and more. They were the first to mix sweet and savory and the first to use saffron in cooking!

            Meat was typically pork, although lamb was also eaten. The wealthy hunted gazelle and wild ass, and the Imperial Court kept lands for such hunting! Salted mullet roe that was pressed into a dry sausage of sorts was eaten, with caviar used commonly by the 1100s. On Orthodox fast days, no meat or fish was usually eaten and instead, they ate pease pudding with nutmeg. Millet porridge called piston was also commonly eaten throughout the week, and millet is very good for you! Typically during the medieval period, beef was cooked with verjuice, which provided a bit of acid to deal with the typical issue of old meat. I always add a bit of balsamic or red wine vinegar to my beef roasts to enhance the flavor. I redacted a medieval roast recipe for the crock pot, and it's delicious every time! :)

            Wines were resinated, much like retsina today, or sweet, like a muscato yum!). Poushka (Roman posca) was also common. Honeywine (mead) was as common as everywhere else, and was used to flavor foods!

             Rose sugar was a common sweet, and of course, the cult of St. Nicholas invented the gingerbread cookie!

            Ah, and I'm adding black-eyed peas with a vinegar and honey sauce to the menu, along with chichees- add a couple of cups of cooked chick peas (garbanzos) to a pan and cover half the peas with water. Pour in just enough olive oil to cover the peas and toss in several cloves of roasted garlic. A couple of hours on a low setting, and yum.

            And, as Marcus Audens and I have been discussing, olive oil was used not only for food, but for bathing as well! Oil was perfumed with herbs and spices to help overcome the smells of a world without Tide and deodorant, and the body would be rubbed in warm oil and scraped clean.


            Blessings,
            Amma

            He who attains love cannot fall.
            
            —Saint Macarius the Great

            On 12/13/2010 1:55 PM, damnnedbeloved wrote:
             

            Khairete,

            So just out of curiousity, what was the cuisine like back then?

            Pax,
            Aeternia

            --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, Amma Ulfsson <ammaulfsson@...> wrote:
            >
            > Greetings dear Cassius,
            >
            > It seems as though soap was widely in use, but so was olive oil and
            > strigil bathing. Olive oil is one of the best things you can use on your
            > skin. In ancient times it was not only used for cleansing the body, but
            > it was also used medicinally and as an aphrodisiac! Most women know the
            > benefits of warm olive oil on dry skin or hair.
            >
            > On a side note, I'm considering making our Christmas dinner all
            > Byzantine this year. Anyone else?
            >
            > Amma
            >
            > He who attains love cannot fall.
            >
            > ---Saint Macarius the Great
            >
            >
            > On 12/11/2010 9:09 PM, Cassius wrote:
            > >
            > > Greetings Amma,
            > >
            > > I think "Daily Life in Byzantium" is out of print, but I'm sure a copy
            > > can still be found through Amazon, eBay or other online source. That's
            > > where I got my copy, lol!
            > >
            > > I've always wanted to have my own Roman bath as well. One thing I've
            > > really always wanted is a strigil... I'd actually use the thing!
            > >
            > > Even speaking of that, the lack of Byzantine detail is maddening. Did
            > > the Byzantines use oil and a strigil to remove dirt before bathing? Or
            > > did soap come into vogue sometime during the Byzantine period? I'll
            > > have to look that up!
            > >
            > > -Cassius
            > >
            > > --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com
            > > <mailto:ByzantiumNovumCulture%40yahoogroups.com>, Amma Ulfsson
            > > <ammaulfsson@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I have always wanted a Roman-style bath of my own! Of course, I need
            > > the
            > > > huge home to put it in first! No, it certainly wouldn't be public! :)
            > > >
            > > > I have been doing some reading to brush up on my cooking and food
            > > > knowledge, so I'll be interested to hear about more of what this book
            > > > offers! And I'll be looking for that book myself!
            > > >
            > > > Blessings,
            > > > Amma
            > > >
            > > > He who attains love cannot fall.
            > > >
            > > > ---Saint Macarius the Great
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > On 12/8/2010 8:38 PM, Cassius wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Greetings all,
            > > > >
            > > > > I finally received my copy of "Daily Life in Byzantium" but haven't
            > > > > had time to read much. However, the couple of snippits I have glanced
            > > > > at have me a little upset!
            > > > >
            > > > > It's astounding how much information there is out there on Classical
            > > > > Rome. Every aspect of daily life is written about... from what
            > > went on
            > > > > in the baths, to how they cooked, gardened, dressed, made cloth,
            > > > > organized their homes, did art, etc. etc.
            > > > >
            > > > > Byzantium? Well, who would bother to write about that!
            > > > >
            > > > > It occured to me that I didn't even know if the Byzantines used Roman
            > > > > style baths. I looked it up online.. got ONE Wikipedia article
            > > about a
            > > > > bath house in Constantinople, that was burned down in the Nika riots
            > > > > and was "later rebuilt."
            > > > >
            > > > > That's it.
            > > > >
            > > > > So far the Daily Life book is a gem, even though it's certainly not
            > > > > exhaustive in detail itself.
            > > > >
            > > > > Anyway, the answer to my question was... the Byzantines pretty much
            > > > > kept up the Roman public bath system. It was common for Citizens in
            > > > > Constantinople to visit the baths twice a day, but three times was
            > > > > considered a bit decadant. The men and women bathed at different
            > > times
            > > > > because morals had changed a bit... but it all remained pretty much
            > > > > Roman for many centuries.
            > > > >
            > > > > It's the little details that make things interesting to the public I
            > > > > think. I've seen people really interested in the Roman baths, and
            > > it's
            > > > > amazing to see that the subject is ignored in Byzantium... simply
            > > > > because it was the *Eastern* empire.
            > > > >
            > > > > Lots of cultural work to be done here I think! :)
            > > > >
            > > > > -Marcus Cassius Julianus
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            >


          • damnnedbeloved
            I dubbeth thee Mummy. ~~Aeternia
            Message 5 of 20 , Dec 16, 2010
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              I dubbeth thee Mummy.


              ~~Aeternia

              --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, Amma Ulfsson <ammaulfsson@...> wrote:
              >
              > You flatter me unnecessarily, my dear. And certainly, I am up for
              > adoption! One rule, you must let me cook!
              >
              > He who attains love cannot fall.
              >
              > â€"Saint Macarius the Great
              >
              >
            • Amma Ulfsson
              I am honored! :) He who attains love cannot fall. ... I am honored! :) He who attains love cannot fall. Saint Macarius the Great On 12/16/2010 9:49 AM,
              Message 6 of 20 , Dec 19, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                I am honored! :)
                He who attains love cannot fall.
                
                —Saint Macarius the Great

                On 12/16/2010 9:49 AM, damnnedbeloved wrote:
                 

                I dubbeth thee Mummy.

                ~~Aeternia

                --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, Amma Ulfsson <ammaulfsson@...> wrote:
                >
                > You flatter me unnecessarily, my dear. And certainly, I am up for
                > adoption! One rule, you must let me cook!
                >
                > He who attains love cannot fall.
                >
                > â€"Saint Macarius the Great
                >
                >

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