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Ostrich Ragout

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  • James Mathews
    Master Christopher England; Another of my friends expressed a real desire to try the Osrich Vinaigrette, so I thought I would sent her the other recipe which
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 20, 2014
      Master Christopher England;

      Another of my friends expressed a real desire to try the Osrich Vinaigrette, so I thought I would sent her the other recipe which goes a little farther into the cooking aspect of this dish.  Once it was set up, there was no reason not to send it to all the oganizations to which I belong.  So here is the second Ostrich Recpe.  I would think the the osprich pieces would be rather large, and would necessitat cutting them up similar to a larger animal.

      >>>> Ostrich Ragout <<<<

      Until the 1980’s the ostrich was considered as exotic as the elephant, but since then it has become available in supermarkets.  Cooking a whole ostrich is an enormous task, but Aspicius provides the below recipe for ostrich:

      In struthione elixo: piper, mentam, cuminum, assume, apii, semen, dactylos vel caryotas, mel, acetum, passum, liquamen, et oleum modice et in caccabo facies ut bulliat.  Amulo obligas, et sic partes struthionis in lance perfundis, et desuper piper aspargis. Si autem in condituram coquere volueris, alicam addis.

      For boiled ostrich: pepper, mint, roast cumin, celery seed, dates or Jericho dates, honey, vinegar, passum, garum,a little oil.  Put these in a pot and bring to the boil.  Bind with amulum, pour over the pieces of ostrich in a serving dish and sprinkle with pepper.  If you wish to cook the ostrich in the sauce, add alicia.  (Ap. 212)

      You may prefer to roast or fry your ostrich, rather than boil it.  Which ever you choose, the sauce goes well with it.  For 500g ostrich pieces , fried or boiled you will need:

      >> 2 teaspoons flour;
      >> 2 tablespoons olive oil;
      >> 300ml passum (desert wine);
      >> 1 tablespoon roast cumin seeds;
      >> 1 teaspoon celery seeds;
      >> 3 pitted candied dates;
      >> 3 tablespoons of garum, or a 50g tin of anchovies;
      >> 1 teaspoon pepper corns;
      >> 2 tablespoons fresh chopped mint;
      >> 1 teaspoon honey;
      >> 3 tablespoons strong vinegar.

      Make a roux with the flour and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, add the passum, and continue to stir until the sauce is smooth.  Pound together in the following order: the cumin, celery seeds, dates, garum or anchovies, peppercorns, chopped mint, the remaining olive oil, the honey, and vinegar.  Add this to the thickened wine sauce.  Then stir in the ostrich pieces and let them heat through in the sauce.     
    • christopher england
      Well, if I do end up getting ahold of some ostrich, I sure know where to go for a recipe. On Monday, January 20, 2014 3:45 PM, James Mathews
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 24, 2014
        Well, if I do end up getting ahold of some ostrich, I sure know where to go for a recipe.



        On Monday, January 20, 2014 3:45 PM, James Mathews <JLMTopog@...> wrote:
         
        Master Christopher England;

        Another of my friends expressed a real desire to try the Osrich Vinaigrette, so I thought I would sent her the other recipe which goes a little farther into the cooking aspect of this dish.  Once it was set up, there was no reason not to send it to all the oganizations to which I belong.  So here is the second Ostrich Recpe.  I would think the the osprich pieces would be rather large, and would necessitat cutting them up similar to a larger animal.

        >>>> Ostrich Ragout <<<<

        Until the 1980’s the ostrich was considered as exotic as the elephant, but since then it has become available in supermarkets.  Cooking a whole ostrich is an enormous task, but Aspicius provides the below recipe for ostrich:

        In struthione elixo: piper, mentam, cuminum, assume, apii, semen, dactylos vel caryotas, mel, acetum, passum, liquamen, et oleum modice et in caccabo facies ut bulliat.  Amulo obligas, et sic partes struthionis in lance perfundis, et desuper piper aspargis. Si autem in condituram coquere volueris, alicam addis.

        For boiled ostrich: pepper, mint, roast cumin, celery seed, dates or Jericho dates, honey, vinegar, passum, garum,a little oil.  Put these in a pot and bring to the boil.  Bind with amulum, pour over the pieces of ostrich in a serving dish and sprinkle with pepper.  If you wish to cook the ostrich in the sauce, add alicia.  (Ap. 212)

        You may prefer to roast or fry your ostrich, rather than boil it.  Which ever you choose, the sauce goes well with it.  For 500g ostrich pieces , fried or boiled you will need:

        >> 2 teaspoons flour;
        >> 2 tablespoons olive oil;
        >> 300ml passum (desert wine);
        >> 1 tablespoon roast cumin seeds;
        >> 1 teaspoon celery seeds;
        >> 3 pitted candied dates;
        >> 3 tablespoons of garum, or a 50g tin of anchovies;
        >> 1 teaspoon pepper corns;
        >> 2 tablespoons fresh chopped mint;
        >> 1 teaspoon honey;
        >> 3 tablespoons strong vinegar.

        Make a roux with the flour and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, add the passum, and continue to stir until the sauce is smooth.  Pound together in the following order: the cumin, celery seeds, dates, garum or anchovies, peppercorns, chopped mint, the remaining olive oil, the honey, and vinegar.  Add this to the thickened wine sauce.  Then stir in the ostrich pieces and let them heat through in the sauce.     


      • Jeff Smith
        Hi there, Is there anything that can replace ostrich in these recipes? Some other meat? Baduila ... From: christopher england Sent: 01/24/14 12:24 PM To:
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 24, 2014
          Hi there,
           
          Is there anything that can replace ostrich in these recipes? Some other meat?
           
          Baduila
           

           

          ----- Original Message -----

          From: christopher england

          Sent: 01/24/14 12:24 PM

          To: ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com

          Subject: Re: [ByzantiumNovumCulture] Ostrich Ragout

           
           

           

          Well, if I do end up getting ahold of some ostrich, I sure know where to go for a recipe.
           
           
          On Monday, January 20, 2014 3:45 PM, James Mathews <JLMTopog@...> wrote:
           
          Master Christopher England;
           
          Another of my friends expressed a real desire to try the Osrich Vinaigrette, so I thought I would sent her the other recipe which goes a little farther into the cooking aspect of this dish.  Once it was set up, there was no reason not to send it to all the oganizations to which I belong.  So here is the second Ostrich Recpe.  I would think the the osprich pieces would be rather large, and would necessitat cutting them up similar to a larger animal.
           
          >>>> Ostrich Ragout <<<<
           
          Until the 1980’s the ostrich was considered as exotic as the elephant, but since then it has become available in supermarkets.  Cooking a whole ostrich is an enormous task, but Aspicius provides the below recipe for ostrich:
           
          In struthione elixo: piper, mentam, cuminum, assume, apii, semen, dactylos vel caryotas, mel, acetum, passum, liquamen, et oleum modice et in caccabo facies ut bulliat.  Amulo obligas, et sic partes struthionis in lance perfundis, et desuper piper aspargis. Si autem in condituram coquere volueris, alicam addis.
           
          For boiled ostrich: pepper, mint, roast cumin, celery seed, dates or Jericho dates, honey, vinegar, passum, garum,a little oil.  Put these in a pot and bring to the boil.  Bind with amulum, pour over the pieces of ostrich in a serving dish and sprinkle with pepper.  If you wish to cook the ostrich in the sauce, add alicia.  (Ap. 212)
           
          You may prefer to roast or fry your ostrich, rather than boil it.  Which ever you choose, the sauce goes well with it.  For 500g ostrich pieces , fried or boiled you will need:
           
          >> 2 teaspoons flour;
          >> 2 tablespoons olive oil;
          >> 300ml passum (desert wine);
          >> 1 tablespoon roast cumin seeds;
          >> 1 teaspoon celery seeds;
          >> 3 pitted candied dates;
          >> 3 tablespoons of garum, or a 50g tin of anchovies;
          >> 1 teaspoon pepper corns;
          >> 2 tablespoons fresh chopped mint;
          >> 1 teaspoon honey;
          >> 3 tablespoons strong vinegar.
           
          Make a roux with the flour and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, add the passum, and continue to stir until the sauce is smooth.  Pound together in the following order: the cumin, celery seeds, dates, garum or anchovies, peppercorns, chopped mint, the remaining olive oil, the honey, and vinegar.  Add this to the thickened wine sauce.  Then stir in the ostrich pieces and let them heat through in the sauce.     
           

           

           





          BADUILA CHALKEUS
          Senator, Grand Chancellor of Byzantium Novum, Duke of Anatoliou Pelagous, etc.
        • James Mathews
          Senator Baduila; In response to your question about substituting another kind of meat for ostrich -- The lady whom I first contacted indicated that she would
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 24, 2014
            Senator Baduila;

            In response to your question about substituting another kind of meat for ostrich -- The lady whom I first contacted indicated that she would use the first Ostrich recipe with chicken because ostrich was not available.  Although there is no mention of such in Mr. Faas' Cookbook, I would think that turkey would be a satisfactory substitute as well (my idea).  There are, however, the following which are mentioned in the cookbook and all have cooking directions for them.  Chicken, as one would imagine, has the most recipes, but the following  were mentioned as well:

            Thrush, Figpecker (ficedula - pied flycatcher), quail, Ibis, storks, wood pigeon, goose liver, whole goose, duck, crane, flamingo, parrot, turtle-doves, herons, swans, peacock, pheasant, or guinea fowl.

            Poultry pie is recommended for all birds and the wrapping of poultry in a dough of oil and flour and put in the oven.  Time for baking depends upon the size of the bird; Bake at 325 degrees F,  quail 30 minutes, chicken one hour, swan three hours.  It might make sense (and be more Roman) to boil the swan before wrapping it in the crust!!!
             
            Respectfully;

            Marcus Audens
              
            On Jan 24, 2014, at 12:26 PM, Jeff Smith wrote:

            Hi there,

             
            Is there anything that can replace ostrich in these recipes? Some other meat?
             
            Baduila
             

          • Jeff Smith
            Thanks you, Senator. I think those birds (well, some of them anyway) are more likely to wind up on my plate than an ostrich. Baduila ... From: James Mathews
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 24, 2014
              Thanks you, Senator. I think those birds (well, some of them anyway) are more likely to wind up on my plate than an ostrich.
               
              Baduila
               
               

               

              ----- Original Message -----

              From: James Mathews

              Sent: 01/24/14 03:53 PM

              To: ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com

              Subject: Re: [ByzantiumNovumCulture] Ostrich Ragout

               
               

              Senator Baduila;

               
              In response to your question about substituting another kind of meat for ostrich -- The lady whom I first contacted indicated that she would use the first Ostrich recipe with chicken because ostrich was not available.  Although there is no mention of such in Mr. Faas' Cookbook, I would think that turkey would be a satisfactory substitute as well (my idea).  There are, however, the following which are mentioned in the cookbook and all have cooking directions for them.  Chicken, as one would imagine, has the most recipes, but the following  were mentioned as well:
               
              Thrush, Figpecker (ficedula - pied flycatcher), quail, Ibis, storks, wood pigeon, goose liver, whole goose, duck, crane, flamingo, parrot, turtle-doves, herons, swans, peacock, pheasant, or guinea fowl.
               
              Poultry pie is recommended for all birds and the wrapping of poultry in a dough of oil and flour and put in the oven.  Time for baking depends upon the size of the bird; Bake at 325 degrees F,  quail 30 minutes, chicken one hour, swan three hours.  It might make sense (and be more Roman) to boil the swan before wrapping it in the crust!!!
               
              Respectfully;
               
              Marcus Audens
                
              On Jan 24, 2014, at 12:26 PM, Jeff Smith wrote:
               

              Hi there,

               
              Is there anything that can replace ostrich in these recipes? Some other meat?
               
              Baduila
               

               





              BADUILA CHALKEUS
              Senator, Grand Chancellor of Byzantium Novum, Duke of Anatoliou Pelagous, etc.
            • James Mathews
              Senator Baduila; Well, I have only eaten ostrich that one time at a Roman Event. It was a sausage about that same diameter as a normal pork sausage, probably
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 24, 2014
                Senator Baduila;

                Well, I have only eaten ostrich that one time at a Roman Event.  It was a sausage about that same diameter as a normal pork sausage, probably two to three feet in length.  It was coiled flat and skewered two ways with long wooden pins.  It was then laid on a grill over hot coals and cooked on both sides.  The sausage was pre-seasoned well and the meat as very delicious.  I know that there are ostrich farms in the U. S. just as there are elk and buffalo farms, so perhaps the meat will become more popular in time.

                Respectfully;

                Marcus Audens

                 
                On Jan 24, 2014, at 4:07 PM, Jeff Smith wrote:

                Thanks you, Senator. I think those birds (well, some of them anyway) are more likely to wind up on my plate than an ostrich.

                 
                Baduila
                 
                 

                ----- Original Message -----

                From: James Mathews

                Sent: 01/24/14 03:53 PM

                To: ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com

                Subject: Re: [ByzantiumNovumCulture] Ostrich Ragout

                 
                 

                Senator Baduila;

                 
                In response to your question about substituting another kind of meat for ostrich -- The lady whom I first contacted indicated that she would use the first Ostrich recipe with chicken because ostrich was not available.  Although there is no mention of such in Mr. Faas' Cookbook, I would think that turkey would be a satisfactory substitute as well (my idea).  There are, however, the following which are mentioned in the cookbook and all have cooking directions for them.  Chicken, as one would imagine, has the most recipes, but the following  were mentioned as well:
                 
                Thrush, Figpecker (ficedula - pied flycatcher), quail, Ibis, storks, wood pigeon, goose liver, whole goose, duck, crane, flamingo, parrot, turtle-doves, herons, swans, peacock, pheasant, or guinea fowl.
                 
                Poultry pie is recommended for all birds and the wrapping of poultry in a dough of oil and flour and put in the oven.  Time for baking depends upon the size of the bird; Bake at 325 degrees F,  quail 30 minutes, chicken one hour, swan three hours.  It might make sense (and be more Roman) to boil the swan before wrapping it in the crust!!!
                 
                Respectfully;
                 
                Marcus Audens
                  
                On Jan 24, 2014, at 12:26 PM, Jeff Smith wrote:
                 

                Hi there,

                 
                Is there anything that can replace ostrich in these recipes? Some other meat?
                 
                Baduila
                 
                 




                BADUILA CHALKEUS
                Senator, Grand Chancellor of Byzantium Novum, Duke of Anatoliou Pelagous, etc.


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