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Caucasus Mtns.

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  • James Mathews
    ... A range of mountains (also known as the Caspian Range) extending between he Euxine (Black) and the Caspian Seas (in a broader sense the term Caucasus is
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 20, 2012
      >>>Caucasus<<< (Kavkas).

      A range of mountains (also known as the Caspian Range) extending between he Euxine (Black) and the Caspian Seas (in a broader sense the term Caucasus is used to include regions to the North and South as well).  The mythical hero Prometheus was aid to have been imprisoned on a Caucasus mountainside, and the land of Colchis (to the southwest) was the goal of the Argonauts’ quest for the Golden Fleece.  After a prolonged and at times brilliant prehistory, in which the route beside the Caspian already played a major part in migrations from central to southwest Asia--and the East-West road became frequented as well--the Black Sea Coast of the Caucasus was colonized by the Greeks between the eighth and sixth centuries BC.  Herodotus knew of the great size of the range and the diversity of it peoples (later stressed in further detail by Strabo and Pliny the Elder, see also Dioscurias.  For the northwestern area, see Bosporus [Cimmerian], Phanagoria).

      Alexander the Great’s conquest of the Persian Empire freed the southern fringes of the Caucasian region, but Iberia (Georgia), through which ran the Darial Pass or Caucasian Gates (also misleadingly known as the Caspian Gates), came under the control of Mithridates VI of Pontus until his defeat by Pompey the Great (65); thereafter the little Iberian state was a Roman client from time to time, though Nero’s proposed expedition to annex it never materialized.  Albania (Shirvan) to the East was often loosely dependent upon Rome; the reorganization of Cappadocia by Vespasian (AD 69-79) was intended to dominate Albania and Iberia alike.  As for Colchis bordering on the Euxine coast, parts of its maritime strip was more or less permanently under Roman and later Byzantine supervision and control.  The ample Caucasian forests were especially prized for shipbuilding.  (Alexandria by the Caucasus [qv] has nothing to do with the Caucasus Mountains; it is in the Paropamisus [Hindu Kush], and owed it’s name to a confusion between the two ranges).

      Reference:

      Michael Grant, “A Guide To the Ancient World, A Dictionary Of Classical Place Names,” H.W. Wilson, Co. 1986, Page 158.

      Respectfully Submitted,  Marcus Audens

    • James Mathews
      Greetings All; For those who may have an interest in the military actions of the ancient and medieval periods, I have just uploaded a diagram of the Battle of
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 30, 2012
        Greetings All;

        For those who may have an interest in the military actions of the
        ancient and medieval periods, I have just uploaded a diagram of the
        "Battle of Casilinum #2" onto the Militarium Blog:

        http://ByzantiumNovumMilitarium.blogspot.com

        An explanation of the differences between Battle #1 and #2 is
        included. Enjoy!!!

        Respectfully;

        Marcus Audens
      • James Mathews
        Sorry about the previous article s title! I was in a hurry to get the item out in the mail. Respectfully; Marcus Audens
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 30, 2012
          Sorry about the previous article's title! I was in a hurry to get the
          item out in the mail.

          Respectfully;

          Marcus Audens
          On Aug 30, 2012, at 1:22 PM, James Mathews wrote:

          >
          > Greetings All;
          >
          > For those who may have an interest in the military actions of the
          > ancient and medieval periods, I have just uploaded a diagram of the
          > "Battle of Casilinum #2" onto the Militarium Blog:
          >
          > http://ByzantiumNovumMilitarium.blogspot.com
          >
          > An explanation of the differences between Battle #1 and #2 is
          > included. Enjoy!!!
          >
          > Respectfully;
          >
          > Marcus Audens
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