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Re: [ByzantiumNovumCulture] the Cato Journal: Volume 14 Number 2, Fall 1994

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  • Sandra Rangel
    Yeah it was definitely an interesting article. And I had assumed it was written fairly recently (ie 1-2 years) given how some people are viewing the current
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 13, 2011
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      Yeah it was definitely an "interesting" article. And I had assumed it was written fairly recently (ie 1-2 years) given how some people are viewing the current economic situation but it was from '94.

      Rohesia

      On Tue, Sep 13, 2011 at 2:37 AM, Timothy Dawson <timothy@...> wrote:
       

      Hooray for Capitalist Historical Revisionsism!

      Shame it is quite undermined by the fact that the empire did not "die"
      at that time at all.

      Dr. Timothy Dawson
      Secretary / Treasurer
      Hetaireia Palatiou



      On 12 Sep 2011, at 15:12, Sandra Rangel wrote:
      Greetings,

      I am doing a little research about grain and bread in early Byzantium/
      Late Roman times and found this intriguing article.

      "How Excessive Government Killed Ancient Rome" by Bruce Bartlett

      http://www.cato.org/pubs/journal/cjv14n2-7.html

      YIS,

      Lady Rohesia
      Governor of Neophthia


    • Cassius
      Greetings Lady Rohesia, Many thanks for posting this! I m not certain I agree with the overall point of the article but it was certainly an interesting read.
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 4, 2011
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        Greetings Lady Rohesia,

        Many thanks for posting this! I'm not certain I agree with the overall point of the article but it was certainly an interesting read.

        I'm wondering what the author would think of Byzantine government, which was *strictly* controlled by the State, yet had the strongest currency and economic security in the European continent for centuries.

        Oddly, the largest of the *internal* causes of the collapse of Byzantine prosperity was through privatization. Large land barons began to amass huge tax-free estates that were so wealthy they presented a challenge that eventually bankrupted the state. Reminds me a bit of modern mega-corporations, but I'm sure I'm also reading my own thoughts into history also, lol! ;)

        In any case it's great to see stuff that makes one think. Many thanks for posting it!

        -Marcus Cassius Julianus





        --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, Sandra Rangel <arwynn16@...> wrote:
        >
        > Greetings,
        >
        > I am doing a little research about grain and bread in early Byzantium/Late
        > Roman times and found this intriguing article.
        >
        > "How Excessive Government Killed Ancient Rome" by Bruce Bartlett
        >
        > http://www.cato.org/pubs/journal/cjv14n2-7.html
        >
        > YIS,
        >
        > Lady Rohesia
        > Governor of Neophthia
        >
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