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Roman Beetroot Soup

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  • James Mathews
    Rohesia; You are quite welcome. Below is a beetroot soup -- Roman Borshch (recipe from Varro (Ap. 64); Make a stock of water, sweet white wine, salt, and a
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 13, 2011
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      Rohesia;

      You are quite welcome.  

      Below is a beetroot soup -- "Roman Borshch"  (recipe from Varro (Ap. 64);

      Make a stock of water, sweet white wine, salt, and a skinny old chicken.  (Bring to a boil and cook until the chicken is thoroughly done.) Then peel four beetroot and add them to the stock.  Remove the chicken.  When the soup is dark red and tasty, strain it and pour it back into the pan.  Leave it to cool.  If preferred, remove some of the chicken fat and replace it with a dash of olive oil.  The Russians often used ferment beetroot juice in borscht.  In all likelihood the Romans also discovered that the soup tastes better after a few days.  Bring the soup to a boil every 12 hours to prevent it from spoiling.  Add pieces of chopped beetroot before serving.

      Reference:

      Patrick Fass (Eds.-Author), Shaun Whiteside (trans.) "Around the Roman Table; Food and Feasting In Ancient Rome," (Univ. of Chicago Press - 1994)


      On Jul 12, 2011, at 11:04 PM, Sandra Rangel wrote:

      Thanks for this.... I bought a small one at World Market for scribing... now I need to go back and buy one for food! I have that book, was just given to me as a gift last week, but had not read it yet.


      Rohesia

      On Tue, Jul 12, 2011 at 10:16 PM, James Mathews <JLMTopog@...> wrote:
       


      Below is an article about the use of the mortar in Roman Kitchens:

      The Mortar

      The mortar (mortarium) occupied a prominent place in the kitchens and restaurants, and was used not only to grind salt, pepper, and hard spices but also to pound herbs into paste and vegetables into pulp.  Meat and fish were mashed and minced in the mortar for all kinds of dishes, such as terrines and meatballs.  Sauces were blended in it too.  You can emulsify and blend vinaigrettes and mayonnaise in a mortar, without any whipping -- in fact, all the work of modern food-processors and blenders can be accomplished in a mortar  (with a little extra elbow grease!!).

      The order in which ingredients are put into a mortar is of some relevance.  Anything that must be ground to a fine powder, then sieved goes in first, when the mortar is dry; things such as coriander seed, bits of husk, cumin, fennel, and cardamom.  Then follow the smallest seeds and the hardest spices, such as lovage, rue, rocket, mustard, poppy, and fenugreek.  Dried herbs, the stalks removed, follow, and then sturdier ingredients, such as garlic — coarse salt helps to reduce it and other vegetables to a fine paste.  The Romans also used the mortar to crush nuts and dried fruit into a paste as the base of many sauces.  The pastes were mixed with liquids, such as broth or brine, vinegar or wine, water or oil, or some combination of these to make various kinds of sauces.

      Reference:

      Patrick Faas (Author / Eds.), Shaun Whiteside (trans.), "Around the Roman Table; Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome," Univ. of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 1994 [ISBN 0-226-23347--2 (pbk)].

      Respectfully Submitted;

      Marcus Audens 




    • Amma Doukaina
      Here s some more information on the soup: It was originally made from cow parsnip, called a barszcz and that was the original name. This parsnip is also part
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 13, 2011
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        Here's some more information on the soup:

        It was originally made from cow parsnip, called a barszcz and that was the
        original name. This parsnip is also part of the hogweed family, and the
        soup was called hogweed borscht in some places. Note the word is spelled
        in about 20 different ways depending on the area and language. Depending
        where in Eastern Europe you are, it can be thin with or without a dollop
        of sour cream on top, creamy, red (from either tomatoes or beetroot), have
        meat, potatoes (not medieval, nor are tomatoes), and the sour flavor was
        caused by fermented wheat or a mix of fermented beet juice and old meat
        stock that was in the pot from sitting around all the time. Yummy, right?!
        They can even be various shades of red or can be green! It just depends
        what veggies you use.
        Originally, a pot was kept in the home for cast-off parts of veggies. When
        the pot was full or the family needed a meal, water or stock was added and
        it was cooked into a mushy vegetable stew, which was usually strained to
        get out the skins and other inedible pieces. The edible parts would be cut
        up and returned to the pot. Since primarily the beet tops were eaten in
        medieval times, the beet root would be in the veggie pot. When it cooked,
        it turned the whole thing red, and tada! Borscht was born! Truly though,
        "barszcz" has been made in different areas in very different ways for a
        very long time.

        Thank you for sharing this!

        Amma

        On Wed, 13 Jul 2011 09:05:46 -0600, James Mathews <JLMTopog@...>
        wrote:

        > Rohesia;
        >
        > You are quite welcome.
        >
        > Below is a beetroot soup -- "Roman Borshch" (recipe from Varro (Ap.
        > 64);
        >
        > Make a stock of water, sweet white wine, salt, and a skinny old
        > chicken. (Bring to a boil and cook until the chicken is thoroughly
        > done.) Then peel four beetroot and add them to the stock. Remove the
        > chicken. When the soup is dark red and tasty, strain it and pour it
        > back into the pan. Leave it to cool. If preferred, remove some of
        > the chicken fat and replace it with a dash of olive oil. The Russians
        > often used ferment beetroot juice in borscht. In all likelihood the
        > Romans also discovered that the soup tastes better after a few days.
        > Bring the soup to a boil every 12 hours to prevent it from spoiling.
        > Add pieces of chopped beetroot before serving.
        >
        > Reference:
        >
        > Patrick Fass (Eds.-Author), Shaun Whiteside (trans.) "Around the Roman
        > Table; Food and Feasting In Ancient Rome," (Univ. of Chicago Press -
        > 1994)
        >
        >
        > On Jul 12, 2011, at 11:04 PM, Sandra Rangel wrote:
        >
        >> Thanks for this.... I bought a small one at World Market for
        >> scribing... now I need to go back and buy one for food! I have that
        >> book, was just given to me as a gift last week, but had not read it
        >> yet.
        >>
        >>
        >> Rohesia
        >>
        >> On Tue, Jul 12, 2011 at 10:16 PM, James Mathews
        >> <JLMTopog@...> wrote:
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Below is an article about the use of the mortar in Roman Kitchens:
        >>
        >> The Mortar
        >>
        >> The mortar (mortarium) occupied a prominent place in the kitchens
        >> and restaurants, and was used not only to grind salt, pepper, and
        >> hard spices but also to pound herbs into paste and vegetables into
        >> pulp. Meat and fish were mashed and minced in the mortar for all
        >> kinds of dishes, such as terrines and meatballs. Sauces were
        >> blended in it too. You can emulsify and blend vinaigrettes and
        >> mayonnaise in a mortar, without any whipping -- in fact, all the
        >> work of modern food-processors and blenders can be accomplished in a
        >> mortar (with a little extra elbow grease!!).
        >>
        >> The order in which ingredients are put into a mortar is of some
        >> relevance. Anything that must be ground to a fine powder, then
        >> sieved goes in first, when the mortar is dry; things such as
        >> coriander seed, bits of husk, cumin, fennel, and cardamom. Then
        >> follow the smallest seeds and the hardest spices, such as lovage,
        >> rue, rocket, mustard, poppy, and fenugreek. Dried herbs, the stalks
        >> removed, follow, and then sturdier ingredients, such as garlic —
        >> coarse salt helps to reduce it and other vegetables to a fine
        >> paste. The Romans also used the mortar to crush nuts and dried
        >> fruit into a paste as the base of many sauces. The pastes were
        >> mixed with liquids, such as broth or brine, vinegar or wine, water
        >> or oil, or some combination of these to make various kinds of sauces.
        >>
        >> Reference:
        >>
        >> Patrick Faas (Author / Eds.), Shaun Whiteside (trans.), "Around the
        >> Roman Table; Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome," Univ. of Chicago
        >> Press, Chicago and London, 1994 [ISBN 0-226-23347--2 (pbk)].
        >>
        >> Respectfully Submitted;
        >>
        >> Marcus Audens
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >


        --
        Vocatus atque non vocatus, Deus aderit.

        There is nothing wrong with you that reincarnation won't cure.
        ~~Jack E. Leonard~~
      • James Mathews
        Lady Amma; This goes along with the story of the soup that was kept cooking on the coals in the fireplace in colonial America. When the men in the field
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 13, 2011
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          Lady Amma;

          This goes along with the story of the "soup" that was kept cooking on the coals in the fireplace in colonial America.  When the men in the field came in for a lunch the soup was scooped out of the pot and eaten with bread.  Whatever vegetables were in season, or whatever wild animals were trapped or shot were also added to the soup pot and it was kept full most of the time.

          I would imagine that like the Romans, these people realized that soup was better standing for a day or two, and brought the soup to a boil periodically to keep it from spoiling.  In the Roman cookbook there is a comment in regard to while the beetroot was being boiled, the attached leaves and stems were being steamed for consumption as well.  I have never tried beet leaves, so I guess the next time we get some beets with leaves attached, I really should try them.  Say a prayer (grin!!).

          Respectfully;

          Marcus Audens

            
          On Jul 13, 2011, at 11:43 AM, Amma Doukaina wrote:

          Here's some more information on the soup:

          It was originally made from cow parsnip, called a barszcz and that was the 
          original name. This parsnip is also part of the hogweed family, and the 
          soup was called hogweed borscht in some places. Note the word is spelled 
          in about 20 different ways depending on the area and language. Depending 
          where in Eastern Europe you are, it can be thin with or without a dollop 
          of sour cream on top, creamy, red (from either tomatoes or beetroot), have 
          meat, potatoes (not medieval, nor are tomatoes), and the sour flavor was 
          caused by fermented wheat or a mix of fermented beet juice and old meat 
          stock that was in the pot from sitting around all the time. Yummy, right?! 
          They can even be various shades of red or can be green! It just depends 
          what veggies you use.
          Originally, a pot was kept in the home for cast-off parts of veggies. When 
          the pot was full or the family needed a meal, water or stock was added and 
          it was cooked into a mushy vegetable stew, which was usually strained to 
          get out the skins and other inedible pieces. The edible parts would be cut 
          up and returned to the pot. Since primarily the beet tops were eaten in 
          medieval times, the beet root would be in the veggie pot. When it cooked, 
          it turned the whole thing red, and tada! Borscht was born! Truly though, 
          "barszcz" has been made in different areas in very different ways for a 
          very long time.

          Thank you for sharing this!

          Amma

          On Wed, 13 Jul 2011 09:05:46 -0600, James Mathews <JLMTopog@...> 
          wrote:

          > Rohesia;
          >
          > You are quite welcome.
          >
          > Below is a beetroot soup -- "Roman Borshch" (recipe from Varro (Ap.
          > 64);
          >
          > Make a stock of water, sweet white wine, salt, and a skinny old
          > chicken. (Bring to a boil and cook until the chicken is thoroughly
          > done.) Then peel four beetroot and add them to the stock. Remove the
          > chicken. When the soup is dark red and tasty, strain it and pour it
          > back into the pan. Leave it to cool. If preferred, remove some of
          > the chicken fat and replace it with a dash of olive oil. The Russians
          > often used ferment beetroot juice in borscht. In all likelihood the
          > Romans also discovered that the soup tastes better after a few days.
          > Bring the soup to a boil every 12 hours to prevent it from spoiling.
          > Add pieces of chopped beetroot before serving.
          >
          > Reference:
          >
          > Patrick Fass (Eds.-Author), Shaun Whiteside (trans.) "Around the Roman
          > Table; Food and Feasting In Ancient Rome," (Univ. of Chicago Press -
          > 1994)
          >
          >
          > On Jul 12, 2011, at 11:04 PM, Sandra Rangel wrote:
          >
          >> Thanks for this.... I bought a small one at World Market for
          >> scribing... now I need to go back and buy one for food! I have that
          >> book, was just given to me as a gift last week, but had not read it
          >> yet.
          >>
          >>
          >> Rohesia
          >>
          >> On Tue, Jul 12, 2011 at 10:16 PM, James Mathews
          >> <JLMTopog@...> wrote:
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Below is an article about the use of the mortar in Roman Kitchens:
          >>
          >> The Mortar
          >>
          >> The mortar (mortarium) occupied a prominent place in the kitchens
          >> and restaurants, and was used not only to grind salt, pepper, and
          >> hard spices but also to pound herbs into paste and vegetables into
          >> pulp. Meat and fish were mashed and minced in the mortar for all
          >> kinds of dishes, such as terrines and meatballs. Sauces were
          >> blended in it too. You can emulsify and blend vinaigrettes and
          >> mayonnaise in a mortar, without any whipping -- in fact, all the
          >> work of modern food-processors and blenders can be accomplished in a
          >> mortar (with a little extra elbow grease!!).
          >>
          >> The order in which ingredients are put into a mortar is of some
          >> relevance. Anything that must be ground to a fine powder, then
          >> sieved goes in first, when the mortar is dry; things such as
          >> coriander seed, bits of husk, cumin, fennel, and cardamom. Then
          >> follow the smallest seeds and the hardest spices, such as lovage,
          >> rue, rocket, mustard, poppy, and fenugreek. Dried herbs, the stalks
          >> removed, follow, and then sturdier ingredients, such as garlic —
          >> coarse salt helps to reduce it and other vegetables to a fine
          >> paste. The Romans also used the mortar to crush nuts and dried
          >> fruit into a paste as the base of many sauces. The pastes were
          >> mixed with liquids, such as broth or brine, vinegar or wine, water
          >> or oil, or some combination of these to make various kinds of sauces.
          >>
          >> Reference:
          >>
          >> Patrick Faas (Author / Eds.), Shaun Whiteside (trans.), "Around the
          >> Roman Table; Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome," Univ. of Chicago
          >> Press, Chicago and London, 1994 [ISBN 0-226-23347--2 (pbk)].
          >>
          >> Respectfully Submitted;
          >>
          >> Marcus Audens
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >

          -- 
          Vocatus atque non vocatus, Deus aderit.

          There is nothing wrong with you that reincarnation won't cure.
          ~~Jack E. Leonard~~


        • Amma Doukaina
          Yes, the leaves were more commonly used in fact. You can use fresh ones for salads too. On Wed, 13 Jul 2011 10:28:47 -0600, James Mathews
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 13, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Yes, the leaves were more commonly used in fact. You can use fresh ones
            for salads too.

            On Wed, 13 Jul 2011 10:28:47 -0600, James Mathews <JLMTopog@...>
            wrote:

            > Lady Amma;
            >
            > This goes along with the story of the "soup" that was kept cooking on
            > the coals in the fireplace in colonial America. When the men in the
            > field came in for a lunch the soup was scooped out of the pot and
            > eaten with bread. Whatever vegetables were in season, or whatever
            > wild animals were trapped or shot were also added to the soup pot and
            > it was kept full most of the time.
            >
            > I would imagine that like the Romans, these people realized that soup
            > was better standing for a day or two, and brought the soup to a boil
            > periodically to keep it from spoiling. In the Roman cookbook there is
            > a comment in regard to while the beetroot was being boiled, the
            > attached leaves and stems were being steamed for consumption as well.
            > I have never tried beet leaves, so I guess the next time we get some
            > beets with leaves attached, I really should try them. Say a prayer
            > (grin!!).
            >
            > Respectfully;
            >
            > Marcus Audens
            >
            >
            > On Jul 13, 2011, at 11:43 AM, Amma Doukaina wrote:
            >
            >> Here's some more information on the soup:
            >>
            >> It was originally made from cow parsnip, called a barszcz and that
            >> was the
            >> original name. This parsnip is also part of the hogweed family, and
            >> the
            >> soup was called hogweed borscht in some places. Note the word is
            >> spelled
            >> in about 20 different ways depending on the area and language.
            >> Depending
            >> where in Eastern Europe you are, it can be thin with or without a
            >> dollop
            >> of sour cream on top, creamy, red (from either tomatoes or
            >> beetroot), have
            >> meat, potatoes (not medieval, nor are tomatoes), and the sour flavor
            >> was
            >> caused by fermented wheat or a mix of fermented beet juice and old
            >> meat
            >> stock that was in the pot from sitting around all the time. Yummy,
            >> right?!
            >> They can even be various shades of red or can be green! It just
            >> depends
            >> what veggies you use.
            >> Originally, a pot was kept in the home for cast-off parts of
            >> veggies. When
            >> the pot was full or the family needed a meal, water or stock was
            >> added and
            >> it was cooked into a mushy vegetable stew, which was usually
            >> strained to
            >> get out the skins and other inedible pieces. The edible parts would
            >> be cut
            >> up and returned to the pot. Since primarily the beet tops were eaten
            >> in
            >> medieval times, the beet root would be in the veggie pot. When it
            >> cooked,
            >> it turned the whole thing red, and tada! Borscht was born! Truly
            >> though,
            >> "barszcz" has been made in different areas in very different ways
            >> for a
            >> very long time.
            >>
            >> Thank you for sharing this!
            >>
            >> Amma
            >>
            >> On Wed, 13 Jul 2011 09:05:46 -0600, James Mathews <JLMTopog@...
            >> >
            >> wrote:
            >>
            >> > Rohesia;
            >> >
            >> > You are quite welcome.
            >> >
            >> > Below is a beetroot soup -- "Roman Borshch" (recipe from Varro (Ap.
            >> > 64);
            >> >
            >> > Make a stock of water, sweet white wine, salt, and a skinny old
            >> > chicken. (Bring to a boil and cook until the chicken is thoroughly
            >> > done.) Then peel four beetroot and add them to the stock. Remove the
            >> > chicken. When the soup is dark red and tasty, strain it and pour it
            >> > back into the pan. Leave it to cool. If preferred, remove some of
            >> > the chicken fat and replace it with a dash of olive oil. The
            >> Russians
            >> > often used ferment beetroot juice in borscht. In all likelihood the
            >> > Romans also discovered that the soup tastes better after a few days.
            >> > Bring the soup to a boil every 12 hours to prevent it from spoiling.
            >> > Add pieces of chopped beetroot before serving.
            >> >
            >> > Reference:
            >> >
            >> > Patrick Fass (Eds.-Author), Shaun Whiteside (trans.) "Around the
            >> Roman
            >> > Table; Food and Feasting In Ancient Rome," (Univ. of Chicago Press -
            >> > 1994)
            >> >
            >> >
            >> > On Jul 12, 2011, at 11:04 PM, Sandra Rangel wrote:
            >> >
            >> >> Thanks for this.... I bought a small one at World Market for
            >> >> scribing... now I need to go back and buy one for food! I have that
            >> >> book, was just given to me as a gift last week, but had not read it
            >> >> yet.
            >> >>
            >> >>
            >> >> Rohesia
            >> >>
            >> >> On Tue, Jul 12, 2011 at 10:16 PM, James Mathews
            >> >> <JLMTopog@...> wrote:
            >> >>
            >> >>
            >> >>
            >> >> Below is an article about the use of the mortar in Roman Kitchens:
            >> >>
            >> >> The Mortar
            >> >>
            >> >> The mortar (mortarium) occupied a prominent place in the kitchens
            >> >> and restaurants, and was used not only to grind salt, pepper, and
            >> >> hard spices but also to pound herbs into paste and vegetables into
            >> >> pulp. Meat and fish were mashed and minced in the mortar for all
            >> >> kinds of dishes, such as terrines and meatballs. Sauces were
            >> >> blended in it too. You can emulsify and blend vinaigrettes and
            >> >> mayonnaise in a mortar, without any whipping -- in fact, all the
            >> >> work of modern food-processors and blenders can be accomplished
            >> in a
            >> >> mortar (with a little extra elbow grease!!).
            >> >>
            >> >> The order in which ingredients are put into a mortar is of some
            >> >> relevance. Anything that must be ground to a fine powder, then
            >> >> sieved goes in first, when the mortar is dry; things such as
            >> >> coriander seed, bits of husk, cumin, fennel, and cardamom. Then
            >> >> follow the smallest seeds and the hardest spices, such as lovage,
            >> >> rue, rocket, mustard, poppy, and fenugreek. Dried herbs, the stalks
            >> >> removed, follow, and then sturdier ingredients, such as garlic —
            >> >> coarse salt helps to reduce it and other vegetables to a fine
            >> >> paste. The Romans also used the mortar to crush nuts and dried
            >> >> fruit into a paste as the base of many sauces. The pastes were
            >> >> mixed with liquids, such as broth or brine, vinegar or wine, water
            >> >> or oil, or some combination of these to make various kinds of
            >> sauces.
            >> >>
            >> >> Reference:
            >> >>
            >> >> Patrick Faas (Author / Eds.), Shaun Whiteside (trans.), "Around the
            >> >> Roman Table; Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome," Univ. of Chicago
            >> >> Press, Chicago and London, 1994 [ISBN 0-226-23347--2 (pbk)].
            >> >>
            >> >> Respectfully Submitted;
            >> >>
            >> >> Marcus Audens
            >> >>
            >> >>
            >> >>
            >> >>
            >> >
            >>
            >> --
            >> Vocatus atque non vocatus, Deus aderit.
            >>
            >> There is nothing wrong with you that reincarnation won't cure.
            >> ~~Jack E. Leonard~~
            >>
            >>
            >


            --
            Vocatus atque non vocatus, Deus aderit.

            There is nothing wrong with you that reincarnation won't cure.
            ~~Jack E. Leonard~~
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